Andrew Bond

Andrew Bond
University of Bristol | UB · Bristol CardioVascular

BSc(Hons), DIC, PhD

About

38
Publications
184,605
Reads
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306
Citations
Citations since 2017
22 Research Items
179 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023010203040
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - present
University of Bristol
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Right VEntricle function in CHildren (RVENCH Study). A comparative study of the dysfunctional right ventricle in different congenital heart diseases
November 2014 - June 2016
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Mesenchymal stromal cells for co-transplantation with pancreatic islets to improve graft function in Type 1 Diabetes
April 2014 - September 2014
University of Bristol
Position
  • Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques, Foam Cell Phenotypes and Extracellular Proteinases
Education
October 2003 - December 2007
Imperial College London, Dept. of Bioengineering
Field of study
  • Effect of age and species on blood flow patterns at arterial branches in relation to atherosclerosis

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Functional endothelial cells (EC) are a critical interface between blood vessels and the thrombogenic flowing blood. Disruption of this layer can lead to early thrombosis, inflammation, vessel restenosis, and, following coronary (CABG) or peripheral (PABG) artery bypass graft surgery, vein graft failure. Blood-derived ECs have shown potential for v...
Conference Paper
Introduction Human saphenous veins (hSV) are routinely used during coronary artery bypass grafting, however around 50% of grafted veins occlude 5–10 years post-surgery, often due to platelet aggregation and restenosis. All blood vessels are lined with endothelial cells which are coated in glycocalyx (eGlx), a gel-like layer of macromolecules at the...
Article
Full-text available
Human saphenous vein (hSV) and synthetic grafts are commonly used conduits in vascular grafting, despite high failure rates. Decellularising hSVs (D-hSVs) to produce vascular scaffolds might be an effective alternative. We assessed the effectiveness of a detergent-based method using 0% to 1% sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to decellularise hSV. Decel...
Article
Full-text available
Transplantation of islets in Type 1 diabetes is limited by poor islet engraftment into the liver, with 2-3 donor pancreases required per recipient. We aimed to condition the liver to enhance islet engraftment to improve long-term graft function. Diabetic mice received a non-curative islet transplant (n=400 islets) via the hepatic portal vein (HPV)...
Article
Full-text available
Neonates with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) combined with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) show significant structural differences compared to neonatal CoA patients with a normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). These effects are likely to change over time in response to growth. This study investigated proteomic differences between coarcted aortic tissu...
Article
Full-text available
Mangafodipir was approved for use as an MRI contrast agent in the late 1990s for liver and pancreas imaging but it was removed from the European market for commercial reasons in 2012. Previously, preliminary work in mice and in diabetic patients showed that Mn²⁺ ions could be used as a contrast agent to monitor the function of insulin-producing β-c...
Article
Islet transplantation is an efficacious therapy for type 1 diabetes; however, islets from multiple donor pancreata are required, and a gradual attrition in transplant function is seen. Here, we manufactured human umbilical cord perivascular mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCPVCs) to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards. HUCPVCs showed a stable p...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster presentation for the BAS/BSCR Basic Science track at BCS 2019. Abstract published here: https://heart.bmj.com/content/105/Suppl_6/A157.1
Conference Paper
Introduction Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) primarily uses autologous human saphenous vein (hSV), despite autologous arteries having better patency rates. However, a lack of arteries, and presence of disease in those which are available, has led to the need to develop alternative tissue engineered conduits. Here we aim to arterialise a vein...
Article
Full-text available
Coarctation of the aorta is a form of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in paediatric patients that can be presented with either bicuspid (BAV) or normal tricuspid (TAV) aortic valve. The congenital BAV is associated with hemodynamic changes and can therefore trigger different molecular remodelling in the coarctation area. This study inves...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction: Autologous saphenous vein (SV) graft failure following coronary artery bypass grafting, occurs in 10-20% of patients within the first year, and ~50% remain patent after 10 years. Tissue engineering strategies have the potential to improve graft patency. We propose that seeding decellularised SV with blood outgrowth cells (BOCs) may yi...
Poster
Full-text available
Graft failure and loss of patency following CABG, using autologous saphenous veins (SV), occurs in 10-20% of patients within the first year, with only 50% remaining patent after 10 years. Bypass grafting using autologous arteries results in improved patency; >95% patent after 15-20 years. There is a need to develop bioengineering strategies to impr...
Article
Full-text available
Right ventricle (RV) remodelling occurs in neonatal patients born with ventricular septal defect (VSD). The presence of a defect between the two ventricles allows for shunting of blood from the left to right side. The resulting RV hypertrophy leads to molecular remodelling which has thus far been largely investigated using right atrial (RA) tissue....
Article
Full-text available
Right ventricle (RV) remodelling occurs in neonatal patients born with ventricular septal defect (VSD). The presence of a defect between the two ventricles allows for shunting of blood from the left to right side. The resulting RV hypertrophy leads to molecular remodelling which has thus far been largely investigated using right atrial (RA) tissue....
Article
Full-text available
Background The right ventricle (RV) is not designed to sustain high pressure leading to failure. There are no current medications to help RV contraction, so further information is required on adaption of the RV to such hypertension. Methods The Right Ventricle in Children (RVENCH) study assessed infants with congenital heart disease undergoing car...
Article
Full-text available
Following interventions to treat atherosclerosis, such as coronary artery bypass graft surgery, restenosis occurs in approximately 40% of patients. Identification of proteins regulating intimal thickening could represent targets to prevent restenosis. Our group previously demonstrated that in a murine model of vascular occlusion, Wnt4 protein expre...
Poster
Full-text available
Aims Islet transplantation is an effective treatment for Type 1 diabetes. Significantly, 60% of islets transplanted fail to engraft. Smaller islets show superior function and engraftment compared to large islets. Islet functionality is routinely equated with insulin secretory capacity, which may not reflect the full extent of islet health and long...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Thelper1 (Th1) lymphocytes have been previously implicated in atherosclerotic plaque growth but their role in plaque vulnerability to rupture is less clear. We investigated whether T-bet knockout that prevents Th1 lymphocyte differentiation modulates classical (M1) macrophage activation or production of matrix degrading metalloproteina...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Rupture of advanced atherosclerotic plaques accounts for most life-threatening myocardial infarctions. Classical (M1) and alternative (M2) macrophage activation could promote atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture by increasing production of proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Lymphocyte-derived cytokines may...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To investigate the hypothesis that COMP can influence the morphology, stability and size of murine atherosclerotic lesions. Methods ApoE- and ApoE/COMP knockout mice were fed a high-fat diet to develop atherosclerotic plaques at lesion sites of three different types; inflammatory and fibrous plaques induced in the carotid artery by low o...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale High-fat diet with obesity-associated co-morbidities triggers cardiac remodeling and renders the heart more vulnerable to ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the effect of high-fat diet without obesity and associated co-morbidities is presently unknown. Objectives To characterize a non-obese mouse model of high-fat diet, assess the vul...
Article
Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is commonly found in bone and cartilage, but has also been detected in the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic plaques. COMP is thought to act as a catalyst in collagen fibrillogenesis, and is predicted to be involved in plaque formation. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice, fed a fatty diet, develop...
Chapter
Atherosclerosis is a potentially fatal disease of the arteries affecting everyone, yet there are relatively few animal models that enable research into the events leading up to the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque (the underlying cause of the majority of fatal thrombotic events). The apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mouse has been used for o...
Chapter
Atherosclerosis is a disease of the medium to large size systemic arteries, and is the leading cause of death world-wide. Although they do not mimic the human disease exactly, a cause of much debate, animal models of atherosclerosis are crucial to our understanding of the risk factors and mechanisms behind the disease's initiation and progression....
Article
The distribution of atherosclerosis around branch sites changes with age in human and rabbit aortas. We tested whether that reflects a change in the pattern of wall shear stress by examining shear-dependent morphological features of endothelial cells. Endothelial cells and their nuclei align and elongate with applied shear. These parameters were ex...
Article
Full-text available
Atherosclerosis has been studied in animals for almost a century, yet the events leading up to the rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque (the underlying cause of the majority of fatal thrombosis formation) have only been studied in the past decade, due in part to the development of a mouse model of spontaneous plaque rupture. Apolipoprotein E knocko...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents an automatic detection method for thin boundaries of silver-stained endothelial cells (ECs) imaged using light microscopy of endothelium mono-layers from rabbit aortas. To achieve this, a segmentation technique was developed, which relies on a rich feature space to describe the spatial neighbourhood of each pixel and employs a S...
Chapter
Atherosclerosis has been studied in animals for exactly a century, starting with the pioneering studies of Ignatowski (reviewed in ref.).1 The motivation for those early studies is unclear, as atherosclerosis was not then recognized as a major disease. However, the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disorders within the global burden of diseas...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial variation in hemodynamic stresses acting on the arterial wall may explain the nonuniform distribution of atherosclerosis. In thoracic aortas of LDL receptor/apolipoprotein E double knockout mice, lesions develop preferentially around the entire circumference of intercostal branch ostia, regardless of age, with the highest prevalence occurri...

Questions

Questions (9)
Question
I am trying to detect by qPCR whether human cells injected into a pig heart are still present in the tissue. Does anyone know of any genes that are not homologous between pig and human, and has anyone designed good primers and be willing to share the sequence please? Thanks.
Question
I would like to permanently fluorescently label porcine cells to enable tracking of the cells when implanted into a host pig for a minimum of 4 weeks. What is the best approach? I have no genome editing experience, so as much info as possible would be gratefully received.
Thanks.
Question
We are seeding human tissue with pig cells and I am looking for a good antibody to detect the pig cells, with absolutely no cross-reactivity with human cells.
Does anyone have experience of any reliable antibodies for IHC on paraffin embedded tissue e.g pig mitochondria, SLA?
Thanks.
Question
I would like to differentiate blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) from pig blood. Due to the current shortage of EGM-2 from Lonza, I am looking for an alternative media. Any suggestions please?
Question
I am looking to compare contraction in human ventricular tissue from two different pathologies. I am able to get electrically stimulated contractions but would like to see whether one pathology has altered calcium signalling leading to altered contraction ability. Any other inotropes better to use?
Question
We have co-transplanted human islets with human MSCs under the kidney capsule of NSG mice. Is there a specific stain I can use for hMSCs? Using anti-HLA picks up the human islets as well.
Also, does anyone have experience of how long the MSCs might hang around for once transplanted? 
Thanks.
Question
We have fixed small pieces of mouse liver in methacarn, and then embedded in paraffin. We are hoping to stain for Ki-67.
What is the best antigen retrieval method for this type of fixed tissue?
Thanks.
Question
We're using an NSG mouse, injected with human cells. Following a glucose tolerance test we'll be measuring c-peptide response. Kit says we need 50ul plasma per test, which is "awkward". Any idea of the dilutions we could get away with?
Question
I have two groups, drug treated vs control, and obtained tissue and made measurements at 5 different time points. A 2-way ANOVA works for some of the variables which are normally distributed, however I'm not sure what test to use for the non-normally distributed ones. Samples size varies but ranges from 7-15 per group at each time point.

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The project will take patient’s veins, remove all the cells to achieve acellular scaffolds (less immunogenic) to be functionalised with growth factors and then transformed in arteries in the lab via cell seeding under dynamic arterial conditions in a modern bioreactor. The ultimate goal is to develop a novel arterial graft to be used in adult patients to allow them to get more early and long-term benefit following bypass surgery operations.
Project
To determine whether there is an effect of age and species on the flow of blood around intercostal branch ostia in the descending thoracic aorta.
Project
A comparative study of the dysfunctional right ventricle in different congenital heart diseases.