Andrew W Bartlow

Andrew W Bartlow
Los Alamos National Laboratory | LANL · Bioscience Division

B.S. Wilkes University; Ph.D. University of Utah
Ecology and biosurveillance of emerging infectious diseases

About

53
Publications
11,523
Reads
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Introduction
The Ecological Health Security Lab combines research, training, and international science networks to tackle local and global health security challenges driven by changing ecologies. We focus on the ecology and biosurveillance of emerging zoonoses and neglected diseases. We take a One Health approach and integrate data on environmental change, biodiversity, conservation, wildlife microbiomes, and livestock health to reduce disease risk. I also study phoretic dispersal and acorn dispersal.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - October 2019
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • In country workshop and training on NGS and Bioinformatics.
May 2019 - May 2019
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Position
  • Lecturer
May 2018 - May 2018
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Gave a lecture on phylogenetic analysis for the sequencing workshop
Education
August 2012 - August 2017
University of Utah
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2006 - May 2010
Wilkes University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Zoonotic diseases, such as brucellosis, Q fever and Rift Valley fever (RVF) caused by Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetii and RVF virus, respectively, can have devastating effects on human, livestock, and wildlife health and cause economic hardship due to morbidity and mortality in livestock. Coinfection with multiple pathogens can lead to more severe...
Article
Full-text available
Background Estimates of the geographical distribution of Culex mosquitoes in the Americas have been limited to state and provincial levels in the United States and Canada and based on data from the 1980s. Since these estimates were made, there have been many more documented observations of mosquitoes and new methods have been developed for species...
Article
Full-text available
Geographic ranges of plants and animals are shifting due to environmental change. While some species are shifting towards the poles and upslope in elevation, the processes leading to these patterns are not well known. We analyzed 22 years of western bluebird (Sialia mexicana) data from a large nest box network in northern New Mexico at elevations b...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have explored how nut weevils (Curculio and Conotrachelus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) prey on the fruits (acorns) of oak (Quercus spp.). However, few, if any, have examined these interactions over both an extensive geographic area and over several years. Here, we observed patterns of infestation in acorns of both red oak (Quercu...
Article
Full-text available
Background Accurate nestling age is valuable for studies on nesting strategies, productivity, and impacts on reproductive success. Most aging guides consist of descriptions and photographs that are time consuming to read and subjective to interpret. The Western Bluebird ( Sialia mexicana ) is a secondary cavity-nesting passerine that nests in conif...
Article
Full-text available
The threat of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases continues to be a challenge to public and global health security. Cooperative biological engagement programs act to build partnerships and collaborations between scientists and health professionals to strengthen capabilities in biosurveillance. Biosurveillance is the systematic process of d...
Article
Mothers may produce more of one sex to maximize their fitness if there are differences in the cost of producing each sex or there are differences in their relative reproductive value. Breeding date and clutch size are known to influence offspring sex ratios in birds through sex differences in dispersal, social behaviours, differential mortality, an...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Committee on Science, Technology, and Law of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS-CSTL) partnered to develop a series of symposia that explore emerging technologies and their ability to transform society, with an emphasis on science and law. By combining the scientific an...
Article
Phoresy is a type of interaction in which one species, the phoront, uses another species, the dispersal host, for transportation to new habitats or resources. Despite being a widespread behaviour, little is known about the ecology and evolution of phoresy. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive review of phoretic dispersal in animals and to bring r...
Article
Full-text available
Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is an alternative to existing soil stabilization techniques for construction and erosion. As with any biologically induced process in soils or aquifers, it is important to track changes in the microbial communities that occur as a result of the treatment. Our research assessed how native microbial co...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific research communities can be represented as heterogeneous or multidimensional networks encompassing multiple types of entities and relationships. These networks might include researchers, institutions, meetings, and publications, connected by relationships like authorship, employment, and attendance. We describe a method for efficiently a...
Article
1.Plant species allocate resources to multiple defensive traits simultaneously, which often leads to so‐called defence syndromes, i.e. suites of traits that are co‐expressed. While reports of ontogenetic variation in plant defences are commonplace, no research to date has tested for ontogenetic shifts in defence syndromes. In addition, we still kno...
Article
Zoonotic diseases pass between humans and other animals and are a major global health challenge. Lyme disease, SARS, swine flu, and Ebola are all examples of diseases spilling over to humans from other animals. Students may hear about these outbreaks in the news but learn very little about them in the classroom. We describe an activity designed to...
Article
Full-text available
Around the world, scavenging birds such as vultures and condors have been experiencing drastic population declines. Scavenging birds have a distinct digestive process to deal with higher amounts of bacteria in their primary diet of carcasses in varying levels of decay. These observations motivate us to present an analysis of captive and healthy Cal...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife populations can respond to changes in climate conditions by either adapting or moving to areas with preferred climate regimes. We studied nesting responses of two bird species, western bluebird (Sialia mexicana) and ash-throated flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens), to changing climate conditions (i.e., rising temperatures and increased drou...
Article
In the western United States, significant environmental change is expected through the combined effects of climate change, tree mortality, drought, and invasive species. Wild animals can be used as indicators of threats to populations and even entire communities by looking for histopathological changes in their tissues. This method may identify thr...
Poster
Rapid environmental change is a major threat to national security and regional stability. A major challenge is identifying impacts of changing conditions on wildlife, agricultural animals, and humans. Environmental contaminants, antimicrobial resistance, and emerging pathogens are all risks to humans and animals globally. Clear evidence is mounting...
Article
Full-text available
Long‐term data on host and parasite fitness are important for predicting how host–parasite interactions will be altered in an era of global change. Here, we use data collected from 1997 to 2013 to explore effects of changing environmental conditions on bird–blowfly interactions in northern New Mexico. The objectives of this study were to examine wh...
Article
Full-text available
Infectious diseases are changing due to the environment and altered interactions among hosts, reservoirs, vectors, and pathogens. This is particularly true for zoonotic diseases that infect humans, agricultural animals, and wildlife. Within the subset of zoonoses, vector-borne pathogens are changing more rapidly with climate change, and have a comp...
Article
Full-text available
1. Rodents regularly rely on emerged epicotyls to locate and remove cotyledons still containing valuable nutrients. However, the extent to which acorn characteristics influence tolerance to post-germination predation has received little attention. 2. Here, we investigated the impact of cotyledon removal following epicotyl emergence on seedling perf...
Article
Scatter-hoarding rodents such as tree squirrels selectively cache seeds for subsequent use in widely-spaced caches placed below the ground surface. This behavior has important implications for seed dispersal, seedling establishment, and tree regeneration. Hoarders manage these caches by recovering and eating some seeds, and moving and re-caching ot...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical compounds in seeds exert negative and even lethal effects on seed-consuming animals. Tannin-degrading bacteria in the guts of small mammals have been associated with the ability to digest seeds high in tannins. At the population level, it is not known if tannins influence rodent species differently according to the composition of their gut...
Article
Full-text available
Fitness of parents and offspring is affected by offspring size. In oaks (Quercus spp.), acorns vary considerably in size across, and within, species. Seed size influences dispersal and establishment of oaks, but it is not known whether size imparts tolerance to seed predators. Here, we examine the relative extent to which cotyledon size serves as b...
Article
Full-text available
Phoresy is a behavior where one organism hitches a ride on another more mobile organism. This is a common dispersal mechanism among relatively immobile species that specialize on patchy resources. Parasites specialize on patchily distributed resources: their hosts. Although host individuals are isolated in space and time, parasites must transmit be...
Article
Introduced parasites threaten native host species that lack effective defenses. Such parasites increase the risk of extinction, particularly in small host populations like those on islands. If some host species are tolerant to introduced parasites, this could amplify the risk of the parasite to vulnerable host species. Recently, the introduced para...
Article
Introduced parasites threaten native host species that lack effective defenses. Such parasites increase the risk of extinction, particularly in small host populations, like those on islands. If some host species are tolerant to introduced parasites, this could amplify the risk of the parasite to vulnerable host species. Recently, the introduced par...
Article
Introduced parasites are a threat to biodiversity when naïve hosts lack effective defenses against such parasites [1]. Several parasites have recently colonized the Galápagos Islands, threatening native bird populations [2]. For example, the introduced parasitic nest fly Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) has been implicated in the decline of end...
Article
Full-text available
Selecting seeds for long-term storage is a key factor for food hoarding animals. Siberian chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) remove the pericarp and scatter hoard sound acorns of Quercus mongolica over those that are insect-infested to maximize returns from caches. We have no knowledge of whether these chipmunks remove the pericarp from acorns of other s...
Article
Full-text available
Several squirrel species excise the embryo of acorns of most white oak species to arrest germination for long-term storage. However, it is not clear how these acorns counter embryo excision and survive in the arms race of coevolution. In this study, we simulated the embryo excision behavior of squirrels by removing 4 mm of cotyledon from the apical...
Article
Full-text available
Predator–prey dynamics are an important concept in ecology, often serving as an introduction to the field of community ecology. However, these dynamics are difficult for students to observe directly. We describe a methodology that employs model caterpillars made of clay to estimate rates of predator attack on a prey species. This approach can be im...
Article
Full-text available
Acorns of many white oak species germinate soon after autumn seed fall, a characteristic widely interpreted as a general adaptation to escape predation by small rodents. However, the mechanism by which early, rapid germination allows escape and/or tolerance of seed damage remains unclear. Here we reported how specific germination traits of chestnut...
Article
Full-text available
Early germination of white oaks is widely viewed as an evolutionary strategy to escape rodent predation; yet, the mechanism by which this is accomplished is poorly understood. We report that chestnut oak Quercus montana (CO) and white oak Q. alba (WO) (from North America), and oriental cork oak Q. variabilis (OO) and Mongolian oak Q. mongolica (MO)...
Article
Full-text available
Studies from both tropical and temperate systems show that scatter-hoarding rodents selectively disperse larger seeds farther from their source than smaller seeds, potentially increasing seedling establishment in larger-seeded plants. Size-biased dispersal is evident in many oaks (Quercus) and is true both across and within species. Here, we predic...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The effects of urbanization on avian community structure are well-documented. Decreasing native species richness is associated with increasing urbanization as well as an increase in the abundance in introduced species. These simplified urban communities are thought to have a higher prevalence of disease since many intro...
Chapter
Full-text available
St. John’s wort (SJW), known botanically as Hypericum perforatum, is a sprawling, leafy herb that grows in open, disturbed areas throughout much of the world’s temperate regions. The use of this species as an herbal remedy to treat a variety of internal and external ailments dates back to the time of the ancient Greeks. Since then, it has remained...
Book
The global popularity of herbal supplements and the promise they hold in treating various disease states have caused an unprecedented interest in understanding the molecular basis of the biological activity of traditional remedies. This volume focuses on presenting current scientific evidence of biomolecular effects of selected herbs and their rela...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Scatter-hoarding mammals are thought to rely on spatial memory to relocate food caches. Yet, we know little about how long these granivores (primarily rodents) recall specific cache locations and whether individual hoarders have an advantage at recovering their own caches. Indeed, a few recent studies suggest that high r...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Humans turn natural landscapes into complex mosaics, which include agriculture, urban, developing, and natural remnants as land cover. Population responses to these landscapes are just as varied. Consequently, interactions between organisms are likely to be altered including parasite-host interactions. Our goal was to...
Poster
We predict that intraspecifc variation in seed size influences acorn dispersal by the Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata Linnaeus). Blue Jays are gape-limited and selectively disperse smaller acorn species (e.g. pin oaks [Quercus palustris Münchh]), but often carry several acorns in their crop during a single dispersal event. We predict that jays foragi...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Understand how environmental change, such as drought, bark beetles, and tree mortality affects bird communities and their nest parasites in the southwestern U.S.