Andrew Barnas

Andrew Barnas
University of Windsor · Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research

About

34
Publications
5,900
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138
Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral Fellow at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor. Interested in the impacts of novel predators on avian nesting behaviour, and the use of drones in wildlife research.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Grizzly bears have been observed with increasing frequency in northern Manitoba, Canada over the last four decades (1980 – 2020), likely originating from the established population in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. We summarize and present an interdisciplinary synthesis of documented observations of grizzly bears in northern Manitoba from h...
Article
The presence of foraging bears in Arctic breeding bird colonies has been increasingly reported in the literature, and these may constitute disturbance events which cause incubating birds to leave their nest. Avian predators may associate with bears during such events, likely to capitalize on unattended nests in the presence of bears. Here, we estim...
Article
Climate-induced sea-ice loss represents the greatest threat to polar bears (Ursus maritimus), and utilizing drones to characterize behavioural responses to sea-ice loss is valuable to forecasting polar bear persistence. In this manuscript, we review previously published literature and draw on our own experience of using multirotor aerial drones to...
Article
Full-text available
Drones may be valuable in polar research because they can minimize researcher activity and overcome logistic, financial, and safety obstacles associated with wildlife research in Polar Regions. Because Polar species may be particularly sensitive to disturbance and some research suggests behavioral responses to drones are species-specific, there is...
Article
Full-text available
Drones are increasingly popular tools for wildlife research, but it is importantthat the use of these tools does not overshadow reporting of methodological detailsrequired for evaluation of study designs. Thediversity in drone platforms, sensors, andapplications necessitates the reporting of specific details for replication, but there is littleguid...
Article
Full-text available
Relatively little is known about the feeding ecology of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Wapusk National Park. Other ursids, polar bears (Ursus maritimus), are well known predators of waterfowl nests in the area, and grizzly bears could feasibly make use of such resources. However, since the arrival of polar bears on land in the spring is largely de...
Article
Full-text available
Upon publication of the original article [1], it was noticed that Alexandra Z. Worden's affiliation is not complete. The full affiliation information for Alexandra Z. Worden is can be found below and in the complete affiliation list of this Correction article.
Article
Full-text available
Conspecific brood parasitism allows females to exploit other females’ nests and enhance their reproductive output. Here, we test a recent theoretical model of how host females gain inclusive fitness from brood parasitism. High levels of relatedness between host and parasitizer can be maintained either by; 1) kin recognizing and parasitizing each ot...
Article
Full-text available
Lesser snow goose (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) populations have dramatically altered vegetation communities through increased foraging pressure. In remote regions, regular habitat assessments are logistically challenging and time consuming. Drones are increasingly being used by ecologists to conduct habitat assessments, but reliance on georefe...
Article
Using automated processes to detect wildlife in uncontrolled outdoor imagery in the field of wildlife ecology is a challenging task. In imagery provided by Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), this is especially true where individuals are small and visually similar to background substrates. To address these challenges, this work presents an automated fee...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Complex multicellularity requires elaborate developmental mechanisms, often based on the versatility of heterodimeric transcription factor (TF) interactions. Homeobox TFs in the TALE superclass are deeply embedded in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate embryogenesis. Knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) TFs, homologous to animal MEIS...
Preprint
Full-text available
Homeobox transcription factors (TFs) in the TALE superclass are deeply embedded in the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate embryogenesis. Knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) TFs, homologous to animal MEIS, have been found to drive the haploid-to-diploid transition in both unicellular green algae and land plants via heterodimerization with other TALE...
Chapter
Full-text available
Using automated processes to detect wildlife in uncontrolled outdoor imagery in the field of wildlife ecology is a challenging task. This is especially true in imagery provided by an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS), where the relative size of wildlife is small and visually similar to its background. This work presents an automated feedback loop which...
Article
Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are increasingly popular tools for studying wildlife ecology. The non-invasive aspect of UAS and the ability to collect a large amount of high-resolution imagery should be of interest to polar bear (Ursus maritimus) researchers who face logistic challenges with field work and developing minimally invasive methods. We...
Article
Full-text available
Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are relatively new technologies gaining popularity among wildlife biologists. As with any new tool in wildlife science, operating protocols must be developed through rigorous protocol testing. Few studies have been conducted that quantify the impacts UAS may have on unhabituated individuals in the wild using standard...
Article
Full-text available
During much of the year, polar bears in western Hudson Bay use energy-conserving hunting tactics, such as still-hunting and stalking, to capture seals from sea-ice platforms. Such hunting allows these bears to accumulate a majority of the annual fat reserves that sustain them on land through the ice-free season. As climate change has led to earlier...
Conference Paper
Image recognition is challenging in the field of wildlife ecology as samples of a specific species can be rare, making manual detection cumbersome. With over 2,060,000 images taken from motion-sensor trail cameras and unmanned aerial vehicle flights, a touch enabled web interface has been developed to allow citizen scientists and ecologists to cate...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Currently there are a lot of papers and projects examining the responses of wildlife to drone surveys, but the majority of these seem to focus on behavioural responses of individuals. So far, I have only been able to find three papers examining physiological impacts of drones on wildlife:
Ditmer, Mark A., et al. "Bears show a physiological but limited behavioral response to unmanned aerial vehicles." Current Biology 25.17 (2015): 2278-2283.
Ditmer, Mark A., et al. "Bears habituate to the repeated exposure of a novel stimulus, unmanned aircraft systems." Conservation physiology 7.1 (2019): coy067.
Weimerskirch, Henri, Aurélien Prudor, and Quentin Schull. "Flights of drones over sub-Antarctic seabirds show species-and status-specific behavioural and physiological responses." Polar Biology 41.2 (2018): 259-266.
Does anyone know of any other papers or conference proceedings that explore this subject?
Thanks!

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