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Andrew O. Agbaje

Andrew O. Agbaje
University of Eastern Finland Kuopio · Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition

MD, MPH, Cert. Clinical Research (Harvard)

About

28
Publications
729
Reads
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39
Citations
Introduction
Dr Agbaje is a physician, clinical epidemiologist and currently a clinical researcher at the University of Eastern Finland. His primary research aims to understand the relationships of aerobic fitness and body composition with cardio-metabolic health, arterial structure and function from childhood through adulthood. His secondary research focuses on global public health of minority groups, health management in resource poor settings, psychiatry and infectious disease prevention.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
University of Eastern Finland
Position
  • Course Teacher
Description
  • Teaching Meta-analysis and systematic review to Masters and PhD students
September 2018 - October 2018
University of Eastern Finland
Position
  • Course Teacher
Description
  • Taught international Master's, Exchange Bachelors and Master's, and PhD students in Foundation of Public Health course.
May 2017 - present
University of Eastern Finland
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Arterial stiffness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality in middle-aged and old adults. Arterial stiffness has been limited to being an intermediate marker of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in adolescents and young adult studies. The paucity of normative longitudinal data and repeated gold-standard assessment...
Article
Introduction: Elevated resting heart rate in adults is an established risk factor in the lifelong process of atherogenesis and its intermediate process such as arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, it is unclear whether resting heart rate temporally and bi-directionally associates with...
Article
Introduction: Elevated resting heart rate in adults is an established risk factor in the lifelong process of atherogenesis and its intermediate process such as arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, it is unclear whether resting heart rate temporally and bi-directionally associates with...
Article
Background We investigated the temporal causal longitudinal associations of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) progression with the risk of dysglycemia, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Methods We included 3862, 17.7-year-old, participants from the Avon Longi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviour (SB) in the form of recreational screen time, and sleep time (ST), are associated with cardiometabolic disease risk in adolescents. The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for children and youth has emphasised the integration of these three movement behaviours rather than in isolation (PA ≥60 min/day, SB...
Article
We examined the temporal longitudinal associations of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) with the risk of overweight/obesity and elevated blood pressure (BP)/hypertension. We studied 3862 adolescents aged 17.7 years from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and C...
Conference Paper
Introduction: An American Heart Association’s statement recommended investigating the natural history of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) vis-à-vis the rate at which arterial stiffness and BP increase with age. Hypothesis: To test whether carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and carotid intima-med...
Conference Paper
Introduction: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) are strong predictors of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in adults. However, due to the unavailability of hard outcomes among adolescents and young adults, it remains unclear how cfPWV and cIMT predict metabol...
Article
Background The American Heart Association's scientific statement on the importance of arterial stiffness recommended that future studies investigate whether increasing arterial stiffness with advancing age results from the age-associated increase in systolic blood pressure (BP). The statement also recommended investigating the natural history of ar...
Article
Background A temporal association where better arterial function and structure predicts adiponectin level and skeletal muscle mass during childhood remains uninvestigated. Methods We studied 5566 children and adolescents (51% girls) aged 9-11 years from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort, Bristol, UK. Brachia...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To determine whether estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) and adiponectin bi-directionally associate with arterial function and structure and if CRF mediates the relationship between cardiometabolic health and arterial outcomes in 9-11-year-old children using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and C...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
PURPOSE: To determine whether pre-clinical signs of atherosclerosis such as endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness associates with cardiorespiratory fitness and fat mass. METHODS: We studied 5566 children and adolescents (51% girls) aged 9-11 years from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort, Bristol, UK....
Article
Introduction: Evidence on the associations of fat mass and lean mass with changes in carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), markers of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, from adolescence through young adulthood is lacking. Previous studies have reported strong associations of body mass index (BMI), a measu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: Several school-based PA interventions have been conducted to improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) but the results remain controversial or equivocal. Moreover, sub-optimal or varied methods in quantifying CRF and accounting for body size and composition have limited the comparison of the intervention effects. We evaluated the effects...
Article
Purpose: To investigate the associations of directly measured peak oxygen uptake ( formula presented ) and body fat percentage (BF%) with arterial stiffness and arterial dilatation capacity in children. Methods: Findings are based on 329 children (177 boys and 152 girls) aged 8-11 years. formula presented was assessed by a maximal cardiopulmonary e...
Article
Full-text available
We aimed to develop cut‐points for directly measured peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2peak) to identify boys and girls at increased cardiometabolic risk using different scaling methods to control for body size and composition. Altogether 352 children (186 boys, 166 girls) aged 9–11 years were included in the analyses. We measured V̇O2peak directly during a...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
UndeRstanding FITness and Cardiometabolic Health In Little Darlings (urFIT-child) is a multidisciplinary and multicentre research group involving the University of Eastern Finland, Finland; University of Exeter, UK; University of Bristol, UK. We also collaborate with the Pediatric Exercise Research Laboratory group, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada. Data for this study are drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), also known as Children of the 90s, a world-leading birth cohort study. More than 14,000 pregnant women were recruited from April 1991 through December 1992 and the children arising from the pregnancy, and their partners have been followed up intensively over two decades. http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/ The urFIT-child project, sub-set of the ALSPAC study, seeks to understand how modifiable early life risk factors influence cardiometabolic and arterial health from childhood through young adulthood. Current project links are: Cardiorespiratory fitness adiposity and lean mass in relation to arterial structure and function from childhood to adulthood: The ALSPAC study https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/130051 Associations between sedentary time and physical activity with arterial function and structure from childhood to adulthood: The ALSPAC study https://proposals.epi.bristol.ac.uk/?q=node/130208