Andreas L. S. Meyer

Andreas L. S. Meyer
University of Cape Town | UCT · African Climate & Development Initiative

PhD

About

19
Publications
16,385
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1,071
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Introduction
I am a biologist interested in ecology and evolutionary biology. My research focuses on several aspects of macroevolution and macroecology, including patterns of biodiversity, niche evolution, diversification rates, and species responses to global change.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem he...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of diversification rates are invaluable for many macroevolutionary studies. Recently, an approach called BAMM (Bayesian Analysis of Macro-evolutionary Mixtures) has become widely used for estimating diversification rates and rate shifts. At the same time, several papers have concluded that estimates of net diversification rates from the m...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The reciprocal relationship between geographical and ecological niche space known as Hutchinson's duality provides a powerful framework to analyse the relationship between biogeographical distributions and environmental variables. However, little attention has been given to how the structure of niche space is associated with the distribution of...
Article
Full-text available
Primates might be particularly vulnerable to experiencing adverse effects from climate change, given their level of exposure, sensitivity to climatic conditions, and biological traits associated with extinction proneness (e.g., low dispersal ability). Therefore, a key question is whether primates will be able to adapt fast enough to keep up with fu...
Article
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Species geographical ranges are at the core of many areas in evolutionary biology, yet empirical studies on the evolution of geographical ranges have been limited. Here, we integrate information on the phylogenetic relationships and geographical distribution of 3097 species of mammal (Artiodactyla, Carnivora, Chiroptera, Marsupialia, and Primates)...
Article
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Ants, an ecologically successful and numerically dominant group of animals, play key ecological roles as soil engineers, predators, nutrient recyclers, and regulators of plant growth and reproduction in most terrestrial ecosystems. Further, ants are widely used as bioindicators of the ecological impact of land use. We gathered information of ant sp...
Article
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Habitat loss is a leading cause of extinctions, which may occur even before species are recorded or formally described. On the other hand, limitations in species distribution data and sampling biases can hamper inferences about patterns of species richness that form the basis of conservation strategies. Insects, despite their crucial roles in terre...
Article
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Known for its remarkable biodiversity and high levels of endemism, the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest has been characterized as one of the most threatened biomes on the planet. Despite strong interest in recent years, we still lack a comprehensive scenario to explain the origin and maintenance of diversity in this region, partially given the relativ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Climate change is likely to pose serious consequences for biodiversity in the coming decades. Impacts on nonhuman primates are of particular concern given that several species exhibit attributes associated with high vulnerability to climate change. Moreover, most species inhabit forests degraded by human activities, exposing them to additional thre...
Article
Full-text available
Monkey groups travel in line, exposing individuals to differential risks according to their position. We recorded events of arriving and departing from the sleeping site in a group of Leontopithecus caissara to investigate how the highest risk position is shared among group-mates during those events. We found the dominant male was the first to arri...
Article
Full-text available
In a previous paper (Meyer and Wiens 2018), we used simulations and empirical data to show that BAMM can give misleading estimates of rates and rate shifts. In simulations, BAMM underestimated rate shifts across every tree analyzed, and assigned incorrect rates to most clades in most trees. In empirical analyses, BAMM behaved as expected from simul...
Article
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An extended period of parental care is fundamental for survival of cetacean offspring. Although qualitative descriptions of parental care and mother-calf spatial relationships are available for several species, studies using a quantitative approach throughout development of offspring are scarce. Here, we analyzed how strategies of parental care occ...
Article
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Despite the remarkable diversity found in squamate reptiles, most of their species tend to be found in warm/dry environments, suggesting that climatic requirements played a crucial role in their diversification, yet little is known about the evolution of their climatic niches. In this study, we integrate climatic information associated with the geo...
Chapter
Full-text available
Climate change is likely to pose serious consequences for biodiversity in the coming decades. Impacts on nonhuman primates are of particular concern given that several species exhibit attributes associated with high vulnerability, such as small population size, narrow distribution range, and limited dispersal capacity. Moreover, most species inhabi...
Article
Full-text available
Mountains of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest can act as islands of cold and wet climate, leading to the isolation and speciation of species with low dispersal capacity, such as the toadlet species of the genus Brachycephalus. This genus is composed primarily by diurnal species, with miniaturized body sizes (<2.5 cm), inhabiting microhabitats in the l...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how biodiversity will respond to climate change is a major challenge in conservation science. Climatic changes are likely to impose serious threats to many organisms, especially those with narrow distribution ranges, small populations and low dispersal capacity. Lion tamarins (Leontopithecus spp.) are endangered primates endemic to Br...
Article
Full-text available
Despite considerable interest in recent years on species distribution modeling and phylogenetic niche conservatism, little is known about the way in which climatic niches change over evolutionary time. This knowledge is of major importance to understand the mechanisms underlying limits of species distributions, as well as to infer how different lin...

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