Andreas Lehmann

Andreas Lehmann
School of Music Wuerzburg, Germany · Musicology

PhD

About

67
Publications
57,582
Reads
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3,446
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2000 - present
University of Wuerzburg
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Associated through institutional agreements since 2000
January 2000 - November 2019
School of Music Wuerzburg, Germany
Position
  • CEO

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
Edwin E. Gordon developed the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation (AMMA) test to quantify the extent of an adult's stabilized audiation as a fundamental indicator of musical ability. Although intended to measure audiation exclusively, AMMA is based on a test design similar to the tonal memory subtest of the much older Measures of Musical Talents (...
Chapter
Komponieren und Improvisieren gehören zu den kreativen (generativen) Tätigkeiten in der Musik. Das Spektrum dieser generativen Tätigkeiten ist groß, denn zu ihnen zählen neben der traditionellen Arbeitsweise der klassischen Komponisten spontane Gruppenarrangements und Improvisation im Jazz genauso wie die Verzierungspraxis eines Barockensembles ode...
Chapter
In diesem Beitrag werden die theoretischen Grundlagen des (psychologischen) Experiments vorgestellt und seine Umsetzbarkeit in musikpädagogischer Forschung an einem Beispiel demonstriert.
Article
Studying musical improvisation is methodologically difficult because improvisations are hardly reproducible, and no established theory exists regarding their formation. In particular it is unclear when and if jazz musicians invent new (innovative) melodic patterns or rely on previously overlearned (redundant) phrases. Other similar goal-directed ac...
Chapter
Full-text available
Anecdotal evidence concerning exceptional performances of musical prodigies - such as 14-year-old Mozart's transcription of Allegri's Miserere- captures people's attention but is often of limited scientific use. First attempts to develop an objective aural performance measurement using standardized tasks to analyse complex chords date from the end...
Chapter
Full-text available
Music teachers have often noticed – and even complained about – the heterogeneity of achievements in their general music classrooms. The purpose of this study in music competences was to quantify this range for the first time and attempt to explain individual differences in achievements in the area of practical music making. 420 German secondary sc...
Article
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Entrance examinations and auditions are common admission procedures for college music programs, yet few researchers have attempted to look at the long-term predictive validity of such selection processes. In this study, archival data from 93 student records of a German music academy were used to predict development of musicianship skills over the c...
Article
Full-text available
Deliberate practice (DP) is a task-specific structured training activity that plays a key role in understanding skill acquisition and explaining individual differences in expert performance. Relevant activities that qualify as DP have to be identified in every domain. For example, for training in classical music, solitary practice is a typical trai...
Article
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Biographies of famous musicians abound with references to innate dispositions and more or less proven anecdotal accounts, but little is said about the early social environment that was necessary to support the development of high level performers. Literature on skill acquisition and documented evidence of prodigies and high level performers support...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the last 10 to 15 years, German educators have become increasingly interested in competency modelling. In this paper, we present a theoretical model regarding basic music performance competency in the music classroom, which would be amenable to empirical verification. To arrive at the model, we consulted literature on music perfor-mance and dida...
Article
Full-text available
So far, no empirically validated competence model has been developed for the school subject music. In their study, the authors report on the first attempt to operationalize a theoretical competence model for music instruction and to validate it on the basis of selected tasks. For the sake of research economy, the investigation was restricted to the...
Article
Full-text available
So far, no empirically validated competence model has been developed for the school subject music. In their study, the authors report on the first attempt to operationalize a theoretical competence model for music instruction and to validate it on the basis of selected tasks. For the sake of research economy, the investigation was restricted to the...
Article
This chapter analyses changes in public music performance and performance skills across historical periods. It examines the increases in preparation and specialization over time that have led to the achievement of higher levels of performance. It describes the mechanisms that allow musicians to excel, such as innovative playing techniques and impro...
Article
Two studies investigate the influence of handedness on a musical performance. In Experiment 1 we compared designated non-right-handed (dNRH) and designated right-handed (dRH) string and piano players performing in the (non-inverted) standard playing position with respect to (1) performance-related variables (e.g., musical expression) and (2) health...
Article
Full-text available
The generative processes (types) of composition and improvisation are often claimed to differ from each other with respect to complexity, spontaneity, and listener expectation. While this conceptual difference might be tenable, it is unclear whether it has an empirical perceptual basis. In a listening experiment with three contrasting pieces classi...
Article
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This study explored the differences in ear-playing ability between formal “classical” musicians and those with vernacular music experience (N = 24). Participants heard melodies and performed them back, either by singing or playing on their instruments. The authors tracked the number of times through the listen-then-perform cycle that each participa...
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This study investigates the influence of extensive bimanual training in professional musicians on the incidence of handedness in the most basic form of right-handedness (RH) and non-right-handedness (NRH), according to Annett's "right shift theory". The lateralisation coefficients (LCs) of a total sample of 128 bimanually performing music students...
Article
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Clara Schumann's (1819–1896) important influence on concert life and piano performance throughout the 19th century can still be felt in our times. Virtually all concerts Clara gave between 1828 (at age 9) and 1891 (at age 71) are documented in a historically unique collection of over 1300 printed concert program leaflets (playbills). Combining an h...
Article
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Sight-reading is defined as the execution - vocal or instrumental - of longer stretches of non- or under-rehearsed music at an acceptable pace and with adequate expression. Some people also label this 'playing by sight' or 'prima vista'. Similar to improvisation, sight-reading requires the instant adaptation to new constraints, which places it amon...
Article
The present study investigated affective and physiological responses to changes of tempo and mode in classical music and their effects on heat pain perception. Thirty-eight healthy non-musicians (17 female) listened to sequences of 24 music stimuli which were variations of 4 pieces of classical music. Tempo (46, 60, and 95 beats/min) and mode (majo...
Book
This book provides a concise, accessible, and up-to-date introduction to psychological research for musicians, performers, music educators, and studio teachers. Designed to address the needs and priorities of the performing musician rather than the research community, it reviews the relevant psychological research findings in relation to situations...
Chapter
Recent research in chess, music, and sports confirms that extended experience in a domain has surprisingly limited benefits for enhancing performance, once an acceptable level has been attained. However, the research on the superior performance of some experts demonstrates that focused appropriate training activities can dramatically change the hum...
Book
Full-text available
Das Jahr 2005 bringt für Klaus-Ernst Behne gleich mehrere Jubiläen: zum einen den 65. Geburtstag, zum anderen auch ein akademisches Jubiläum, denn vor dreißig Jahren wurde er zum Professor für Systematische Musikwissenschaft an die Hochschule für Musik Detmold berufen. Mehr als ein Grund also für uns, seine ehemaligen Schüler und Doktoranden, einen...
Article
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This study investigated the prevalence of psychological and physical symptoms and subject-related health problems and attitudes toward health and study on the part of music, psychology, medical, and sports students at the beginning of their university studies. The study investigated 247 music students, 266 medical students, 71 psychology students,...
Article
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This study demonstrates a comprehensive method for linking expert musicians' interpretive choices and associated performances to listeners' perceptions of emotionality. In Phase 1 of the study, 10 expert pianists recorded their prepared interpretations of a highly emotional piece of music (E Chopin's Prelude op. 28, no. 4). They were also interview...
Article
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Innate talents supposedly limit an individual's highest attainable level of performance and the rate of skill acquisition. However, Howe et al. have not reviewed evidence that the level of expert performance has increased dramatically over the last few centuries. Those increases demonstrate that the highest levels of performance may be less co...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated an expert pianist's nine-month preparation for a public music performance (recital) through the collection of practice diaries and MIDI recordings of the eight scheduled pieces. Recordings were made under the experimentally varied conditions of solitary performance and public performance. The practice diaries revealed that t...
Article
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This study investigated the relation between self-reported affective response to everyday life events and affective responses to music listening. The influence of formal music training on affective responses to music was also assessed. Undergraduate music and non-music majors (N = 107) first completed the Affect Intensity Measure (AIM), then a musi...
Article
Full-text available
Following an overview of the current knowledge about the structure and acquisition of expert performance in the arts, sciences and sports, we discuss practical implications for music training, focussing on the development of levels of instrumental skill typically attained by high school students and amateurs. Recent studies found that even the high...
Article
Full-text available
Expert and exceptional performance are shown to be mediated by cognitive and perceptual-motor skills and by domain-specific physiological and anatomical adaptations. The highest levels of human performance in different domains can only be attained after around ten years of extended, daily amounts of deliberate practice activities. Laboratory analys...
Article
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Theories arguing that specific skills are acquired through extended practice cannot easily account for some musicians’ ability to perform unfamiliar music without preparation at first sight (sight-reading). This study identified the source of individual differences in this ability among expert pianists by relating component abilities of sight-readi...
Article
Full-text available
Examined individual differences in sight-reading ability among expert pianists. 16 pianists with specializations in accompanying or solo performance were asked to accompany 2 pre-recorded flute excerpts taken from moderately difficult pieces for solo instruments. Ss completed the accompaniment well with regard to pitches, rhythms, and expressions,...
Article
Full-text available
This exploratory study is concerned with the influence of judgements of visual attractiveness on the auditive evaluation of videotaped female vocal Performances. To 158 subjects of heterogeneous groups (professional singers, [Jazz} musicians, music students and non-professionals) playback video performances of a jazz and a classic piece of music we...
Article
Full-text available
Although a performer knows if he or she is improvising or performing a rehearsed piece of music, this distinction may not be evident to the audience. However, it is possible that typical aspects of performance resulting from more deliberation and preparation or spontaneity induce perceptually salient cues that the listeners can utilize to infer whe...

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Project (1)
Project
German public school curricula and directives are currently being replaced by educational standards (“Bildungsstandards”). A well-known report by Klieme and collaborators (Klieme et al. 2003), which is supposed to serve as a guide in the development of educational standards in Germany, focuses on the concept of competency and the development of corresponding models. Competence is understood as a bundle of cognitive, motivational, volitional, and social abilities and skills which are necessary to solve specific problems in complex situations. Moreover, competencies have to be testable if they are to be used in the development of educational standards. Although school boards have started working on educational standards some time ago, the prerequisite empirical groundwork by music education researchers is sadly missing. In music education there are currently no acceptable competence models which describe and capture the facets and levels of the targeted competencies. Therefore, within the “KoMus-project” we surveyed existing music-psychological research with regard to the production of competence models and tied in with the current music education discourse. Based on this work we stated a competence model for the area of “perceiving and contextualizing music“ (Niessen et al. 2008). This model will be operationalized, tasks assigned, empirically validated in a systematic piloting study with sixth-grade students (11 to 12 year-olds). Item Response Theory (IRT) methodology will be used for development or the preliminary model and further theorizing.