Andrea Spolaor

Andrea Spolaor
Italian National Research Council | CNR

Researcher

About

108
Publications
17,730
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1,094
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Introduction
Andrea Spolaor currently works at Italian National Research Council. Andrea does research in Analytical Chemistry, Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry. Their most recent publication is 'Greenland records of aerosol source and atmospheric lifetime changes from the Eemian to the Holocene'.
Additional affiliations
September 2009 - September 2012
Università degli Studi di Siena
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
Integrative and Comprehensive Understanding on Polar Environments (iCUPE) project developed 24 novel datasets utilizing in-situ observational capacities within the Arctic or remote sensing observations from ground or from space. The datasets covered atmospheric, cryospheric, marine, and terrestrial domains. This paper connects the iCUPE datasets to...
Article
The Col Margherita (MRG) Observatory is a high-altitude background station located in the Eastern Italian Alps. Its elevation and distance from major anthropogenic and natural sources make it ideal for monitoring baseline mercury levels and investigating its geochemical cycles. In this work, total gaseous mercury (TGM), ozone (O3) and meteorologica...
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Full-text available
Iodine has a significant impact on promoting the formation of new ultrafine aerosol particles and accelerating tropospheric ozone loss, thereby affecting radiative forcing and climate. Therefore, understanding the long-term natural evolution of iodine, and its coupling with climate variability, is key to adequately assess its effect on climate on c...
Article
Sea ice plays a pivotal role in Earth's climate and its past reconstruction is crucial to investigate the connections and feedbacks with the other components of the climate system. Among the available archives that store information of past sea ice are marine and ice cores. Recent studies on the IP25 biomarker extracted from marine sediments has sh...
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Full-text available
Ice core dating is the first step for a correct interpretation of climatic and environmental changes. In this work, we release the dating of the uppermost 197 m of the 250 m deep GV7(B) ice core (drill site, 70∘41′ S, 158∘52′ E; 1950 m a.s.l. in Oates Land, East Antarctica) with a sub-annual resolution. Chemical records of NO3-, MSA (methanesulfoni...
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Full-text available
Polar stratospheric ozone has decreased since the 1970s due to anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons and halons, resulting in the formation of an ozone hole over Antarctica. The effects of the ozone hole and the associated increase in incoming UV radiation on terrestrial and marine ecosystems are well established; however, the impact on ge...
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As the intricacies of paleoclimate dynamics are explored, it is becoming understood that sea-ice variability can instigate, or contribute to, climate change instabilities commonly described as “tipping points”. Compared to ice sheets and circulating ocean currents, sea-ice is ephemeral and continental-scale changes to sea ice cover occur seasonally...
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This work presents results from an original open-source low-cost sensor (LCS) system developed to measure tropospheric O3 in a remote high altitude alpine site. Our study was conducted at the Col Margherita Observatory (2543 m above sea level), in the Italian Eastern Alps. The sensor system mounts three commercial low-cost O3/NO2 sensors that have...
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Full-text available
The climate of the sub-Antarctic is important in understanding the environmental conditions of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. However, regional climate proxy records from this region are scarce. In this study, we present the stable water isotopes, major ion chemistry, and dust records from the first ice core from the (sub-)Antarctic Young Islan...
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Full-text available
Black carbon (BC) is a significant forcing agent in the Arctic, but substantial uncertainty remains to quantify its climate effects due to the complexity of the different mechanisms involved, in particular related to processes in the snowpack after deposition. In this study, we provide detailed and unique information on the evolution and variabilit...
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Full-text available
Biomass burning influences global atmospheric chemistry by releasing greenhouse gases and climate-forcing aerosols. There is controversy about the magnitude and timing of Holocene changes in biomass burning emissions from millennial to centennial timescales and, in particular, about the possible impact of ancient civilizations. Here we present a 5...
Article
The role of deposition fluxes on the mercury cycle at Concordia station, on the high Antarctic plateau have been investigated over the Austral summer between December 2017 to January 2018. Wet/frozen deposition was collected daily from specially sited tables, simultaneously with the collection of surface (0-3 cm) and subsurface (3-6 cm) snow and th...
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Full-text available
This study presents the year-round variability of the water-soluble fraction of trace elements (wsTE) and rare earth elements (wsREE) among size segregated airborne particulate matter samples collected at Ny-Ålesund in the Svalbard Archipelago from 26 February 2018 to 26 February 2019. Six different aerosol dimensional fractions were collected usin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ice core dating is the first step for a correct interpretation of climatic and environmental changes. In this work, we release a stratigraphic dating of the uppermost 197 m of the 250 m deep GV7(B) ice core (drilling site, 70°41’S, 158°52’E, 1950 m a.s.l.) with a sub-annual resolution. Chemical stratigraphies of NO3−, MSA (methanesulfonic acid), no...
Article
Primary biological aerosol particles and microorganisms are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Investigations of airborne chemical markers and microbial communities are critical for identifying sources, transport and transformation processes of aerosols. One potential major source of airborne chemical compounds and microbial communities (e.g. L- and D-a...
Article
Organic acids in aerosols Earth's atmosphere are ubiquitous and they have been extensively studied across urban, rural and polar environments. However, little is known about their properties, transport, source and seasonal variations in the Svalbard Archipelago. Here, we present the annual trend of organic acids in the aerosol collected at Ny-Ålesu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Black Carbon (BC) is a significant forcing agent in the Arctic, but substantial uncertainty remains to quantify its climate effects due to the complexity of the different mechanisms involved, in particular related to processes in the snow-pack after deposition. In this study, we provide detailed and unique information on the evolution and variabili...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biomass burning influences global atmospheric chemistry by releasing greenhouse gases and climate-forcing aerosols. There is controversy about the magnitude and timing of Holocene changes in biomass burning emissions from millennial to centennial time scales and, in particular, on the possible impact of ancient civilizations. Here we present a 5 ky...
Preprint
Full-text available
The present work presents the results obtained using an original open-source low-cost sensor (LCS) system developed to measure tropospheric O3 in a remote high altitude alpine site. We conducted our study at the Col Margherita Observatory (2543 m a.s.l.), a World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch Regional Station, located in the I...
Article
Full-text available
The Svalbard archipelago, located at the Arctic sea-ice edge between 74 and 81∘ N, is ∼60 % covered by glaciers. The region experiences rapid variations in atmospheric flow during the snow season (from late September to May) and can be affected by air advected from both lower and higher latitudes, which likely impact the chemical composition of sno...
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Full-text available
Light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols emitted by biomass or fossil fuel combustion can contribute to amplifying Arctic climate warming by lowering the albedo of snow. The Svalbard archipelago, being near to Europe and Russia, is particularly affected by these pollutants, and improved knowledge of their distribution in snow is needed to assess their...
Article
Full-text available
Iron (Fe) is a key element in the Earth climate system, as it can enhance marine primary productivity in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where, despite a high concentration of major nutrients, chlorophyll production is low due to iron limitation. Eolian mineral dust represents one of the main Fe sources to the oceans; thus, quantif...
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Full-text available
We present a thorough evaluation of the water soluble fraction of the trace element composition (Tm, Pr, Tb, Fe, In, Tl) and their fluxes in the annual snowpack and the firn of the Hansbreen (a tidewater glacier terminating in the Hornsund fjord, southwest Spitsbergen). The trace element samples were obtained from a 3 m deep snow pit dug at the pla...
Article
This work presents the first investigation of Br and Cl isotopic partitioning in Southern Ocean sea ice. The sea ice samples characterized were collected during the Australian-led Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem eXperiment-2 (SIPEX-2) marine voyage in austral spring of 2012 (26 Sept – 10 Nov), within the area bounded by 115–125°E and 62–66oS off the...
Article
Fe(II) is more soluble and bioavailable than Fe(III) species, therefore the investigation of their relativeabundance and redox processes is relevant to better assess the supply of bioavailable iron to the oceanand its impact on marine productivity. In this context, we present a discrete chemiluminescence-basedmethod for the determination of Fe(II)...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Svalbard archipelago, between 74° and 81° N, is ∼60 % covered by glaciers and located at the Arctic sea ice edge. The region experiences rapid variations in atmospheric flow during the snow season (from late September to May) and can be affected by air advected both from lower and higher latitudes, which likely impact the chemical composition o...
Article
Nearly all ice core archives from the Arctic and middle latitudes (such as the Alps), apart from some very high elevation sites in Greenland and the North Pacific, are strongly influenced by melting processes. The increases in the average Arctic temperature has enhanced surface snow melting even of higher elevation ice caps, especially on the Svalb...
Article
Full-text available
The role of polar regions is increasing in terms of megatrends such as globalization, new transport routes, demography, and the use of natural resources with consequent effects on regional and transported pollutant concentrations. We set up the ERA-PLANET Strand 4 project “iCUPE – integrative and Comprehensive Understanding on Polar Environments” t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Iron is a key element in the Earth climate system as it can enhance the marine primary productivity in the High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where, despite a high concentration of major nutrients, the chlorophyll production is low due to iron limitation. One of the main Fe sources to the ocean is Aeolian dust. For this reason, ice cores...
Preprint
Full-text available
Black Carbon (BC) is a major forcing agent in the Arctic but substantial uncertainty remains to quantify its climate effects due to the complexity of mechanisms involved. In this study, we provide unique information on processes driving the variability of BC mass concentration in surface snow in the Arctic. Two different snow-sampling strategies we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols emitted by biomass or fossil fuel combustion can contribute to amplify Arctic climate warming by lowering the albedo of snow. The Svalbard archipelago, being near to Europe and Russia, is particularly affected by these pollutants, and improved knowledge of their distribution in snow is needed to assess their im...
Article
Full-text available
Acquiring not only field-specific knowledge but also a set of transferable professional skills becomes increasingly important for Early Career Scientists (ECS) in Geo-sciences and other academic disciplines. Although the need for training in transferable skills adds to the work-load of an individual Early Career Scientist, it is often neglected wit...
Preprint
Full-text available
The role of polar regions increases in terms of megatrends such as globalization, new transport routes, demography and use of natural resources consequent effects of regional and transported pollutant concentrations. We set up the ERA-PLANET Strand 4 project "iCUPE-integrative and Comprehensive Understanding on Polar Environments" to provide novel...
Article
Full-text available
Although it has been demonstrated that the speed and magnitude of the recent Arctic sea ice decline is unprecedented for the past 1450 years, few records are available to provide a paleoclimate context for Arctic sea ice extent. Bromine enrichment in ice cores has been suggested to indicate the extent of newly formed sea ice areas. Despite the simi...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric iodine chemistry has a large influence on the oxidizing capacity and associated radiative impacts in the troposphere. However, information on the evolution of past atmospheric iodine levels is restricted to the industrial period while its long-term natural variability remains unknown. The current levels of iodine in the atmosphere are c...
Article
The concentrations and particle-size distribution of sugars in Arctic aerosol samples were studied to investigate their potential sources and transport. Sugars are constituents of the water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) fraction in aerosol particles where some saccharides are used as tracers of Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs). Monos...
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Full-text available
Sunlit snow is highly photochemically active and plays a key role in the exchange of gas phase species between the cryosphere and the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the behaviour of two selected species in surface snow: mercury (Hg) and iodine (I). Hg can deposit year-round and accumulate in the snowpack. However, photo-induced re-emission of gas...
Article
Full-text available
Sunlit snow is highly photochemically active and plays an important role in the exchange of gas-phase species between the cryosphere to the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the behaviour of two selected species in surface snow: mercury (Hg) and iodine (I). Hg can deposit year-round and accumulate in the snowpack. However, photo-induced re-emission...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric iodine chemistry has a large influence on oxidizing capacity and associated radiative impacts in the troposphere. However, information on the evolution of atmospheric iodine levels is restricted to the Industrial Period while its long-term natural variability remains unknown. The current levels of iodine in the atmosphere are controlled...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Arctic and middle latitude (such as the Alps) ice core archives, except for the Greenland summit, are strongly influenced by melting processes, able to modify the original chemical signal of the annual snowfall. In the last decades, the increase of the average Arctic temperature has caused and enhanced surface snow melting in the higher ice cap...
Article
The Mg/Ca molar ratio in foraminiferal calcite accumulated in marine sea sediments is a well-established proxy of ancient ocean temperatures. Mg is three orders of magnitude less abundant than Ca, and the relationship between their ratio and sea surface temperature is exponential. Consequently, the reliability of the calculated temperature depends...
Article
Aerosol samples were collected with a high-volume cascade impactor with a 10 day sampling frequency at the Gruvebadet observatory, close to Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard Islands). A total of 42 filters were analyzed for free and combined amino acids, as they are key components of bio-aerosol. This article provides the first investigation of free and combine...
Article
Volcanic eruptions are widely used in ice core science to date or synchronize ice cores. Volcanoes emit large amounts of SO2 that is subsequently converted in the atmosphere into sulfuric acid/ sulphate. Its discrete and continuous quantification is currently used to determine the ice layers impacted by volcanic emissions, but available high-resolu...
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Full-text available
Although it has been demonstrated that the speed and magnitude of recent Arctic sea ice decline is unprecedented for the past 1,450 years, few records are available to provide a paleoclimate context for Arctic sea ice extent. Here we present a 120kyr record of bromine enrichment from the RECAP ice core, coastal East Greenland, and reconstruct past...
Article
Polar regions are fragile ecosystems threatened by both long-range pollution and local human contamination. In this context, the environmental distribution of the Personal Care Products (PCPs) represent a major knowledge gap. Following preliminary Antarctic studies, Fragrance Materials (FMs) were analyzed in the seawater and snow collected in the a...
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Full-text available
We determined the specific biomass burning biomarker levoglucosan in an ice core from the TALos Dome Ice CorE drilling project (TALDICE) during the mid- to late Holocene (6000–750 BP). The levoglucosan record is characterized by a long-term increase with higher rates starting at ∼ 4000 BP and peaks between 2500 and 1500 BP. The anomalous increase i...
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Full-text available
The Northern Hemisphere experienced dramatic changes during the last glacial, featuring vast ice sheets and abrupt climate events, while high northern latitudes during the last interglacial (Eemian) were warmer than today. Here we use high-resolution aerosol records from the Greenland NEEM ice core to reconstruct the environmental alterations in ae...
Article
The Northern Hemisphere experienced dramatic changes during the last glacial, featuring vast ice sheets and abrupt climate events, while high northern latitudes during the last interglacial (Eemian) were warmer than today. Here we use high-resolution aerosol records from the Greenland NEEM ice core to reconstruct the environmental alterations in ae...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric iodine causes tropospheric ozone depletion and aerosol formation, both of which have significant climate impacts, and is an essential dietary element for humans. However, the evolution of atmospheric iodine levels at decadal and centennial scales is unknown. Here, we report iodine concentrations in the RECAP ice-core (coastal East Green...
Article
The Antarctic Plateau snowpack is an important environment for the mercury geochemical cycle. We have extensively characterized and compared the changes in surface snow and atmospheric mercury concentrations that occur at Dome C. Three summer sampling campaigns were conducted between 2013 and 2016. The three campaigns had different meteorological c...