Andrea Reid

Andrea Reid
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries

Doctor of Philosophy

About

36
Publications
21,056
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2,075
Citations
Citations since 2017
33 Research Items
2049 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. Andrea Reid is a citizen of the Nisga’a Nation and an Assistant Professor with the University of British Columbia’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries. She is the Principal Investigator with the Centre for Indigenous Fisheries, working to build a national and international hub for the study and protection of culturally significant fish and fisheries.

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples in Northwestern North America have always worked with predictable cycles of day and night, tides, moon phases, seasons, and species growth and reproduction, including such phenological indicators as the blooming of flowers and the songs of birds. Negotiating variability has been constant in people's lives. Long‐term monitoring an...
Article
Ongoing tensions between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities working in support of the protection and management of fish and water in North America have necessitated a shift from current structures towards relationships built upon and driven by respect, relevance, reciprocity, and responsibility. Similarly, the cumulative and evolving effects...
Article
Full-text available
Fisheries are highly complex social-ecological systems that often face ‘wicked’ problems from unsustainable resource management to climate change. Addressing these challenges requires transdisciplinary approaches that integrate perspectives across scientific disciplines and knowledge systems. Despite widespread calls for transdisciplinary fisheries...
Article
Two hypotheses were tested concerning the consequences to adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) of escape from commonly used fishing gear (gillnet, seine net and tangle net). First, by experimentally exposing 214 fish to three commonly used fishing gear types (gillnets, tangle nets, or seine nets) and releasing to complete migration after PIT-t...
Article
Freshwater biodiversity is in a state of crisis. The recent development of a global emergency recovery plan to “bend the curve” for freshwater biodiversity lacks the necessary details for implementation in a regional context. Using Canada as an example, we describe a toolbox intended to equip decision-makers and practitioners with evidence-based to...
Article
Full-text available
In response to colonial research paradigms that have subjugated Indigenous Peoples, knowledges, lands, and waters, Indigenous research methodologies have emerged to center Indigenous visions and voices in research practice. Here, we employ such methodologies to improve collective understanding of the state and future of wild Pacific salmon (Oncorhy...
Article
Full-text available
Inland fisheries make substantial contributions to food security and livelihoods locally, regionally, and globally but their conservation and management have been largely overlooked by policy makers. In an effort to remedy this limited recognition, a cross-sectoral community of scientists, practitioners, and policy makers from around the world conv...
Article
Full-text available
• Freshwater biodiversity is declining at an unprecedented rate. Freshwater conservationists and environmental managers have enough evidence to demonstrate that action must not be delayed but have insufficient evidence to identify those actions that will be most effective in reversing the current trend. • Here, the focus is on identifying essential...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the current state of freshwater biodiversity in Canada, one of the countries with the greatest amount of surface waters in the world. To address this knowledge gap, we compiled a list of all available assessments of conservation status for freshwater species (over 3,000 taxa) and further evaluated the overall status of six dis...
Article
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Abstract Freshwater biodiversity loss is one of the greatest environmental threats in our changing world. Although declines have been reported extensively in the literature, much less attention has been devoted to solving the freshwater biodiversity crisis relative to other ecosystems. The recently proposed Emergency Recovery Plan for Freshwater Bi...
Article
Full-text available
Authorship should acknowledge and reward those deserving of such credit. Moreover, being an author on a paper also means that one assumes ownership of the content. Journals are increasingly requiring author roles to be specified at time of submission using schemes such as the contributor roles taxonomy (CRediT) system, which relies on 14 different...
Article
• In 1949, Aldo Leopold formalized the concept of the ‘land ethic’, in what emerged as a foundational and transformational way of thinking about natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, and stewardship in terrestrial systems. Yet, the land ethic has inherent linkages to aquatic ecosystems; Leopold himself conducted research on rivers...
Article
Full-text available
To address the ongoing global biodiversity crisis, conservation approaches must be underpinned by robust information. Canada is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting global biodiversity targets, with some of the world's largest remaining intact ecosystems, and a commitment to co-application of Indigenous ways of knowing alongside scientific,...
Chapter
Lampreys are an ancient order (Petromyzontiformes) of jawless aquatic vertebrates that inhabit temperate regions across the world. Out of the 41 recognized and extant species, 23 can be found throughout North America. These organisms are important to a number of Indigenous cultures, ecosystem function, and science. The overwhelming majority of the...
Article
Full-text available
Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are at the center of social–ecological systems that have supported Indigenous peoples around the North Pacific Rim since time immemorial. Through generations of interdependence with salmon, Indigenous Peoples developed sophisticated systems of management involving cultural and spiritual beliefs, and stewardship pr...
Article
Full-text available
Increasingly, fisheries researchers and managers seek or are compelled to “bridge” Indigenous knowledge systems with Western scientific approaches to understanding and governing fisheries. Here, we move beyond the all-too-common narrative about integrating or incorporating (too often used as euphemisms for assimilating) other knowledge systems into...
Article
Although it is assumed that the outcomes from scientific research inform management and policy, the so‐called knowledge–action gap (i.e., the disconnect between scientific knowledge and its application) is a recognition that there are many reasons why new knowledge is not always embraced by knowledge users. The concept of knowledge co‐production ha...
Article
In reflecting on the human domination of our planet in the Anthropocene, some have argued that concrete is among the most destructive materials created by humans. Here we explore this idea, specifically in the context of what we consider “the concrete conquest of aquatic ecosystems.” The ubiquitous use of concrete in transportation and building inf...
Article
Aldo Leopold, famous ecologist and “father” of North American wildlife management, once said, “These are two things that interest me: the relation of people to each other, and the relation of people to land.” Ever prescient, Leopold recognized that natural resource management is fundamentally about humans and their relationship with nature well bef...
Article
Full-text available
Having the longest coastlines in the world and some of the largest freshwater ecosystems, Canada has a rich history of exploitation and stewardship of its marine and freshwater fisheries resources. For thousands of years prior to European settlement, Indigenous peoples across what is now Canada utilized and managed marine and freshwater fisheries t...
Article
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Teaching can be a rewarding, yet challenging, experience for early career researchers (ECRs) in fields like ecology and evolution. Much of this challenge arises from the reality that ECRs in ecology and evolution typically receive little, if any, pedagogical training or advice on how to balance teaching, research (which can include extended field w...
Article
Horizon scanning is a systematic approach increasingly used in conservation to explore emerging trends, issues, opportunities, and threats. We present the results from one such exercise aimed at identifying emerging issues that could have important scientific, social, technological, and managerial implications for the conservation of inland waters...
Article
Recreational fisheries that use rod and reel (i.e., angling) operate around the globe in diverse freshwater and marine habitats, targeting many different gamefish species and engaging at least 220 million participants. The motivations for fishing vary extensively; whether anglers engage in catch‐and‐release or are harvest‐oriented, there is strong...
Chapter
Natural freshwater ecosystems represent the terrestrial phases of the global hydrological cycle and include rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, wetlands as well as groundwaters. While fresh waters comprise only 0.01% of the water on Earth and constitute less than one-tenth of the global land surface area, they support > 10% of all recorded species inclu...
Article
Full-text available
In the 12 years since Dudgeon et al. (2006) reviewed major pressures on freshwater ecosystems, the biodiversity crisis in the world's lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams and wetlands has deepened. While lakes, reservoirs and rivers cover only 2.3% of the Earth's surface, these ecosystems host at least 9.5% of the Earth's described animal species. Fu...
Article
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Discarding non‐target fish from commercial fisheries is controversial and has been a persistent concern for fisheries managers globally. Discard management strategies typically begin by understanding mortality rates among discarded fish, a challenging task given the dynamic, highly context‐specific nature of fisheries. An alternative is to develop...
Article
Recommendations and regulations regarding handling of non-target fish (i.e. bycatch) are often vague and subjective in commercial fisheries. Identifying how different components of capture influence the condition of discarded fish can help develop specific guidelines and best handling practices. Using an experimental approach, we modified the sever...
Article
The United Nations’ (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development defines the formidable challenge of integrating historically separate economic, social, and environmental goals into a unified ‘plan of action for people, planet, and prosperity.’ We highlight the substantial contribution inland fisheries can make towards preventing increased poverty...
Article
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Foraging strategies are central in shaping social structure and grouping patterns in primates. We address Colobus guereza foraging strategies by investigating their patch departure decisions in relation to diet composition and nutrition. We examine whether guerezas are constrained in their intake of food in patches and thereby forage according to a...
Article
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs; promulgated in 2015), officially known as “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, are an intergovernmental set of 17 goals and 169 constituent targets that succeed the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs; 2000–2015). Despite a clear mandate to integrate social, economic and envi...
Article
Conservation biology—a “crisis-discipline” focused on protecting and restoring the earth’s biological diversity—has focused historically on terrestrial ecosystems and threats. This may be expected given that humans are a land-based species whose impact is superficially more evident on land than below the water’s surface. However, there is a pronoun...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The number of fish that encounter fishing gear is greater than the number of fish retained as catch. The proportion of this difference that die from the encounter is defined as fishing-related incidental mortality (FRIM). FRIM estimates are required for improved stock assessments, but they are difficult to attain and vary across fisheries. To cope...
Article
1. Wetlands in the Lake Victoria basin serve as structural and hypoxic refugia for some native fishes against predation by introduced Nile perch (Lates niloticus); however, little is known about the fine-scale patterns of distribution and abundance of these refuge inhabitants. 2. This study sought to quantify wetland ecological gradients and determ...
Article
Aquatic hypoxia can affect predator-prey interactions by altering the success rate of the predator and/or the vulnerability of prey. For example, in the Lake Victoria basin of East Africa, native prey exploit hypoxic wetlands as refugia from predation by introduced Nile perch (Lates niloticus). Here, it is predicted that species exploitation of wet...
Article
Full-text available
Food competition in group-living animals is commonly accepted as a critical determinant of foraging strategies and social organization. Here we examine food patch depletion behavior in a leaf-eating (folivorous) primate, the guereza (Colobus guereza). Snaith and Chapman (2005) studied the sympatric folivorous red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus),...

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