Andrea Pavoni

Andrea Pavoni
ISCTE-Instituto Universitário de Lisboa | ISCTE · Centre for Socioeconomic Change and Territorial Studies (DINÂMIA’CET)

Doctor of Philosophy

About

43
Publications
11,936
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189
Citations
Citations since 2017
36 Research Items
176 Citations
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Introduction
Andrea Pavoni is research fellow at DINAMIA'CET, Centre for Socioeconomic and Territorial Studies, at the University Institute of Lisbon, Portugal. He completed his PhD at the University of Westminster, London, in 2013. He is a fellow at the Westminster Law and Theory Lab, co-editor of the Law and the Senses Series (University of Westminster Press), and associate editor at the journal Lo Squaderno, Explorations in Space and Society.

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
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The urban phenomena Goffman addressed in his work have changed significantly over the past decades. From urban sprawl to new media technologies, from multi-scalar networks of urban governance to postcolonial approaches to the urban, public space has been deeply reconfigured. In this paper, we consider two possible strategies to further a Goffman-in...
Preprint
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Goffman’s work remains pivotal today for all scholars interested in the study of public order as well as publicness more generally. Both the analytical categories Goffman introduced, and the fine-grained sensitivity towards capturing the apparently most ephemeral facets of social interaction, constitute praiseworthy and long-lasting aspects of his...
Chapter
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Whether explicitly or implicitly, monsters have always inhabited collective imagination. A rich cosmology of godly and demonical entities populated ancient mythologies, animistic cults, and religions. A monstrous bestiary of narrations and representations has proliferated in literary, political and popular culture, surreptitiously orienting efforts...
Chapter
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In the last decades, in fact, different incidents, events, and social movements challenging the ruling political powers have had the epicentre of their political struggle on urban streets, where new strategies of mobilization and communication have suddenly germinated. This includes the various forms taken by the so-called ‘Arab Spring’; the protes...
Book
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The focus on urban animals is not to be treated as just another specialisation in urban ecology or biology, rather, as a perspective from where the field of urban studies at large, and the domain of social science more generally, can be re-thought in the novel and challenging ways.
Book
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Whether aesthetically or politically inspired, graffiti is among the oldest forms of expression in human history, one that becomes especially significant during periods of social and political upheaval. With a particular focus on the demographic, ecological, and economic crises of today, this volume provides a wide-ranging exploration of urban spac...
Article
In this piece, we introduce the notion of ‘atmoculture’ as a conceptual tool to analyse the new forms of mobility supported and enacted by digital algorithms. In historical perspective, we analyse how modernity has created a movement-space where the problem of finding one's way through an increasingly ‘displaced’ urban space first emerged, with not...
Article
This paper analyses vertical vision by tracing its possible genealogy and exploring the forms it takes in the contemporary city. In the first section, vertical vision is situated in the context of its cosmographic tenets. In the second section, the critique of verticality is complemented by a topological approach where vertical vision can be seen f...
Article
This article explores the making and tasting of wine through the anonymous processes of nonhuman consumption that participate in the production of its relational ontology (the terroir) and shape its visceral encounter with the human tongue (taste). First, the author defines a notion of consumption that is neither reduced to the human, the subjectiv...
Article
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This introduction to the special issue of Contemporary Social Science: 'Urban Animals – Shifting Ecologies of Proximities', argues that the focus on urban animals is not to be treated as just another specialisation in urban ecology or biology, rather, as a perspective from where the field of urban studies at large, and the domain of social science...
Chapter
This chapter explores liminality vis-à-vis mega-events (MEs) and neoliberal urbanisation, proposing MEs as opening a liminality which remains un-experienced. MEs are not simply phenomenologically liminoid but ontologically liminal space-times through which neoliberal urbanisation contradictorily occurs: consistent with Jameson’s definition of moder...
Book
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Described by Aristotle as the most vital of senses, touch contains both the physical and the metaphysical in its ability to express the determination of being. To manifest itself, touch makes a movement outwards, beyond the body, and relies on a specific physical involvement other senses do not require: to touch is already to be active and to activ...
Chapter
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The chapter speculates on the gaping disjunction between experience and abstraction that came to characterise the modern experience, as carefully surveyed in the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, and the form it took today in the current neoliberal condition of planetary urbanisation. In this context, the notion of site has lost any grounding, and in t...
Book
Future Ruins: Lisbon explores sites of urban develop­ment and decline to consider how we navigate and repurpose the future ruins of our urban surroundings. The publication proposes a range of critical cartographies conceived as conceptual tools to help us to think differently about navigating the immaterial structures and material products of the c...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this piece, we introduce the notion of ‘atmoculture’ as a conceptual tool to analyse the new forms of mobility supported and enacted by digital algorithms. In historical perspective, we analyse how modernity has created a movement-space where the problem of finding one’s way through an increasingly ‘displaced’ urban space first popped up, with n...
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses the current co-optation of street art into an uncritical aesthetic supplement to the process of neoliberal urbanisation, by focusing on its unresolved relation with its own site. This is done in three steps. First, via a perambulating immersion into the complexity of a specific site. Second, via a critical engagement with the f...
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The image of the city as a stressful place is an evergreen topic. In this article we review the imagination of urban stress, starting from Simmel’s classic thesis that the modern city is an unavoidably psychic-stimulating environment potentially leading to stimuli overload. City dwellers are then supposed to counter stimuli overload with a series o...
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Considering the absence of an agreed definition of urban violence, this article suggests that exploring the violence-security nexus in the context of planetary urbanisation provides some necessary steps for theorisation. Moving from the analytical toward the conceptual, we offer three conceptual shifts, intended as as many steps toward a theory of...
Article
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Young people's interaction with place is not only a cognitive process of identification but also an affective relation. There has been plenty of research on young people and/in public space but few of those studies have taken such an affective layer of analysis into account. In this paper we aim to shed some light on young people's affective geogra...
Book
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ision traditionally occupies the height of the sensorial hierarchy. The sense of clarity and purity conveyed by vision, allows it to be explicitly associated with truth and knowledge. The law has always relied on vision and representation, from eye-witnesses to photography, to imagery and emblems. The law and its normative gaze can be understood as...
Chapter
This chapter addresses the relation between law and the senses, by elaborating a notion of taste as an inhuman mode of accessing the real in which the oppositions between knowing and sensing, truth and pleasure, collapse. Thus reconfigured, taste is mobilised to reorient law’s dealing with the world beyond its exceptional mechanism of appropriation...
Book
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Taste usually occupies the bottom of the sensorial hierarchy, as the quintessentially hedonistic sense, too close to the animal, the elemental and the corporeal, and for this reason disciplined and moralised. At the same time, taste is indissolubly tied to knowledge. To taste is to discriminate, emit judgement, enter an unstable domain of synaesthe...
Chapter
In Cosme Velho, a leafy neighbourhood of Rio de Janeiro, a wall runs for about six hundred meters, its perimeter encircling two properties. One, owned by the founder of Brazil’s biggest TV network. The other, by the founder of what has morphed into one the world's biggest petrochemical giant. Standing before a wall, it is tempting to assume it as a...
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Introduction to SEE
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Introduction to Taste
Book
How does order emerge out of the multiplicity of bodies, objects, ideas and practices that constitute the urban? This book explores the relation between space, law and control in the contemporary city - and particularly in the context of urban 'mega events' - through a combined geographical and normative analysis. Informed by the recent spatial, af...
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Over the last couple of decades, urban sports have been studied – as well as, in many cases, celebrated – as critical forms of using urban space. Urban climbing, a practice also known as “street bouldering,” “buildering,” “structuring,” and “stegophilia,” has been much explored in this vein. While we acknowledge the importance of bringing to light...
Article
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In this paper, we seek to show how the notion of technophysics can be applied to better understand the experience of contemporary urbanism. We argue that technophysics exists in dynamic relation to what we term an atmoculture of urban space, whereby the technological and the cultural meet on a deeply affective-atmospheric terrain.
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This chapter sketches the contours of a methodological attitude aimed to explore the spatiality and materiality of law by taking abstraction seriously and using abstraction strategically. This is done through five steps. First, I briefly account for the impact that the spatial and subsequent (affective, material, post-human) turns in social science...
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In this chapter I explore the immanent normativity of everyday life in the city by looking at the notion of ‘shared space,’ an urban design approach that challenges the segregation between traffic circulation and social interaction in which urban streetscapes are usually split. Focusing in particular on its current evolution in UK, I critically ana...
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This chapter delineates an ethnographic methodology to explore urban events accounting for the contested contingency of their taking place. This approach marks a difference vis-à-vis more conventional ways to explore urban events, which frame them through static, outcome-oriented, managerial, and de-materialising perspectives that tend to miss and...
Article
This paper addresses the dialectic between mega events (MEs) and the city, and especially the frictions generated by their encounter, which the current wave of protest and resistance to MEs provides with both a significant expression as well as a locus for conceptual and empirical exploration. First, I introduce the argument by looking at the spati...
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Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
We seek to understand the urban atmospheres of the present and the cultural orientations they originate.
Project
The proposed book captures the current socio-cultural and political ‘monstrous’ zeitgeist, by providing an original approach which offers a novel theoretical and critical reading of the contemporary interest and preoccupation with monsters and monstrosity. This is done by challenging the current approach to the question of monsters and monstrosity, which for the most part reduces monstrosity to an epistemological constructs to be demystified via critical tools. While certainly recognising the necessity to challenge the current ‘use’ of monsters within political and media discourse around immigrants, terrorism, security, race, and so on; we argue that this move also reduces the material power of monstrosity, in favour of more generalised and all-encompassing idea of transgression which is simultaneously deconstructed qua cynical strategy of othering; or exalted qua liberating practice of resistance. It is here that lies the conceptual and strategic originality of the chapters constituting this book.
Project
The new Law and the Senses book series, published by Westminster University Press simultaneously in print and digital open access, builds on the existing Law and the Senses series of the Lab, as well as the series of conferences organised over the years on the relation of law to the sensorial. The series aims to reflect critically on how law deals with senses, how law senses, and how law makes sense. This involves thinking, discussing and questioning the sound of law, the tactile encounter with its forms, its bitter/sweet taste, its pungent smell, its perspectival gaze. What is the relationship of law to the senses? In a sense, law, the anaesthetic par excellence, is constantly engaged in numbing the senses into commonsense; manipulating, channelling and controlling the sensible; inserting properties and forbidding contacts; dissimulating violence, regulating sounds and defining taste. However, senses are not static. Rather, they are shifting and elusive qualities, constantly reshuffled by socio-cultural and technological changes, always dislocating Law’s normativity towards new potentialities. In this other sense, Law emerges from the senses, and whereas senses are a constant arena of legal machinations, they are also Law’s constant blind spot and inescapable excess. Is there then a legal sensing, an illegal sensing, or even perhaps a sensing beyond the Law? How does Law sense? Can Law hear, taste, smell, touch, see? Can Law indulge in sensual pleasures, or is it confined to the anaesthetic arena of common sense? Can senses be a tool to use, know and study Law better? Would this make Law more ‘sensible’, or instead more suffocating? Law and Senses gathers trans-disciplinary contributions which aim to critically investigate the sensing of law, the capacity for law to (make) sense, and the possibility for Law to sense differently.