Andrea Ellis

Andrea Ellis
UNEQUI · Science and Creativity

PhD, Cert. Ed., MRSB

About

54
Publications
19,992
Reads
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826
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
602 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction
I am passionate about good science and education. Since 2012 I run my own company - UNEQUI. My research and work focuses on Animal Nutrition, Behaviour, Health & Welfare and Ethics of "Animal-use'. UNEQUI, Research ~ Education ~ Innovation is dedicated to improve the lifes and welfare of animals and humans through scientific research, knowledge dissemination, innovative thinking, solution storming and creative enhancement of all our environments. Find out more about me at www.unequi.co.uk.
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - present
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • MSc Lecturer and Supervisor Equine Science
September 2012 - present
UNEQUI
Position
  • Director, Senior Researcher
September 2004 - September 2012
Nottingham Trent University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (54)
Chapter
To improve the welfare of domesticated horses it would be advantageous to increase feeding time and reduce non-feeding periods without increasing calorific intake. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of the removal of stressful feed times by providing an ad libitum mixed diet on the time budget of stabled horses. This field study was pe...
Article
The term 'biological basis of behaviour' encompasses the physiological mechanisms which 'direct' and 'control' the body (the nervous and endocrine system) and which adapt and change due to both genetic programming but also due to adaptation (plasticity) allowing for individual interaction, perception and experience within the environment. The aim o...
Article
The Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE) was developed to facilitate identification of musculoskeletal pain. To determine the influence of rider skill on ridden horse performance and behaviour, the latter using the RHpE. It was hypothesised that gait quality at trot and canter would improve with a more skilled rider compared with a less skilled rider,...
Article
A Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE) was previously developed to facilitate the detection of musculoskeletal pain. The objectives were to apply the RHpE during warm‐up for the dressage phase of two 5* three‐day events and to correlate the RHpE scores with subsequent performance. It was hypothesised that there would be a higher rate of failure to com...
Article
A Ridden‐Horse‐Ethogram has been developed to differentiate between nonlame and lame horses, and lame horses before and after diagnostic analgesia has abolished musculoskeletal pain, based on video recordings. The objective of this prospective, observational study was to compare real‐time application of the Ridden‐Horse‐Ethogram with analysis of vi...
Article
There is limited scientific evidence concerning the effect of rider weight on pressures under the saddle and equine performance. The objective of this prospective, crossover, randomised trial was to assess pressure distribution and magnitude in horses ridden by four riders of similar ability but differing in bodyweight and height. Six horses in reg...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of rider weight on equine welfare and performance requires further investigation. The objective of this prospective, cross‐over, randomised trial was to assess gait and behavioural responses of horses to riders of similar ability, but different bodyweights. Six nonlame horses in regular work were ridden by each of four riders: Light (L),...
Article
Full-text available
Haylage (dry matter 51%–85%) is one of the most common forages fed to equids in Europe. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability and reliability of the nutrient concentrations in haylage determined by either near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) or traditional Wet chemistry (WCh) methods in a single commercial laboratory. To assess this wi...
Article
Differentiation between alteration in behavior which is the result of pain and that reflecting other behavior is potentially challenging in ridden horses. A ridden horse ethogram has been developed, tested, and combined with a pain score. Nonlame horses generally had lower pain scores than lame horses, although there was a small overlap. To determi...
Article
A very valid discussion about scientific merit of field studies which are very necessary to complement 'lab-controlled' type of studies on our papers on facial expression of pain.
Article
There is evidence that more than 47% of the sports horse population in normal work may be lame, but the lameness is not recognized by owners or trainers. An alternative means of detecting pain may be recognition of behavioral changes in ridden horses. It has been demonstrated that there are differences in facial expressions in nonlame and lame hors...
Article
Poor performance in horses is often attributed to rider or training problems or behavioural abnormalities. Riders often fail to recognise lameness. We need to determine if there are differences in facial expression in lame and non-lame horses when ridden, which may facilitate the identification of horses experiencing pain. A previously developed fa...
Article
Full-text available
The horse is a non-ruminant herbivore adapted to eating plant-fibre or forage-based diets. Some horses are stabled for most or the majority of the day with limited or no access to fresh pasture and are fed preserved forage typically as hay or haylage and sometimes silage. This raises questions with respect to the quality and suitability of these pr...
Article
Many horses presumed to be sound by their riders are not. Facial expression ethograms have previously been used to describe pain-related behavior in horses, but there is a need for a ridden horse facial ethogram to facilitate identification of pain in ridden horses. The objectives of this study were to develop and test an ethogram to describe facia...
Article
The aim of this study was to explore the efficacy of multi-layered haynets and multiple presentation of haynets to increase time spent on feed intake behaviour at night (13. h observation). For preliminary assessment two horses performing the oral stereotypy of crib-biting were included. Six horses received the same amount of forage during a 22-day...
Article
Ophthalmic examination in the horse is generally limited to crude assessment of vision and screening for ocular lesions. The refractive state of equine eyes and the potential impact on vision and performance requires further investigation. To assess the refractive state of a large, mixed-breed sample of horses and ponies in the United Kingdom (UK)....
Article
Feed hygiene is an essential contribution to equine health and welfare. It can be assessed by sensory and microbiological analysis. The aim of this study was: (a) to compare these systems using the results of 171 horse feed samples, previously examined at the Chair of Animal Nutrition and Dietetics, Munich; (b) to compare the microbiological findin...
Conference Paper
Equine science educators at the research university strive to create and deliver exceptional teaching programs, achieve prominence in their scholarly work, and contribute meaningfully to the academic community. Balancing these missions can be challenging for junior and senior faculty alike. This paper explores how educators in equine science can ad...
Article
Concentrations of tryptophan (TRP) and serotonin (5-HT) in plasma were measured in 36 moderately trained Dutch warmblood horses after eight weeks on a high fibre (n=18) or high starch (n=18) diet. Samples were taken three hours after feeding, when the horse was at rest, either at 11.00 or 14.00 hours. Plasma 5-HT and pH were significantly higher in...
Article
In 'sympathetic horsemanship' the importance of the natural behaviour of the horse and the use of body language in communication is emphasised. However, it is unclear what effect sympathetic horsemanship has on the welfare of horses. During a 5-week starting period the effect of a sympathetic (ST) versus a conventional (CT) training method was stud...
Article
The effect of stabling for the first time on the behaviour and welfare of young and naïve horses has not yet been studied in detail. In this study we examined the effect of two typical housing systems on their subsequent behavioural and physiological responses upon first time stabling. Thirty-six 2-year-old Dutch warmbloods, 18 geldings and 18 mare...
Article
The aim of this field study was to examine the influence of a low fibre (LF) and a high fibre (HF) diet on the presence of gastric ulceration in thirty 3-year old Dutch Warmblood horses during training period and during pasture rest. In the first part of the study all horses were stabled individually and fed either an iso-energetic HF (75% haylage)...
Article
Full-text available
The consequences of chewing during eating and rumination of ingesta on the reduction of feed particles has been studied extensively in ruminants (Kennedy, 1984). These studies have lead to the development of the concept of critical size, that is the minimum reduction of feed particle size to allow passage from the rumen. However, feed particle size...
Thesis
Thesis (Ph. D.), Dept. of Applied Science, Writtle College -- University of Essex, 2003.

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