Andrea Doucet

Andrea Doucet
Brock University · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

72
Publications
40,629
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,917
Citations
Introduction
Andrea Doucet is the Canada Research Chair in Gender Work and Care and Professor of Sociology/Women's and Gender Studies, Brock University.
Additional affiliations
July 2011 - present
Brock University
Position
  • Canada Research Chair in Gender, Work and Care
July 1998 - July 2011
Carleton University
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (72)
Article
Approximately 7.8 million Canadians juggle paid work and unpaid adult/elder caregiving responsibilities. This balancing act can cause stress, financial burdens, strained relationships, and mental health issues for these employed caregivers. Employed caregivers who are Indigenous have unique challenges and perspectives when it comes to care and work...
Book
Full-text available
This chapter engages with and widens Lorraine Code’s ecological thinking epistemological approach by using an Indigenous relational framework. It offers a bridge between Indigenous and Western-situated relational ways of knowing and doing environmental sustainability.
Article
Full-text available
How can parental leave design be more socially inclusive? Should all parents be entitled to parental benefits or only those parents who are eligible based on a particular level of labour market participation? To think through questions of social inclusion in parental leave policy design, particularly issues related to entitlements to benefits, I ma...
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses employment/unemployment engagement experiences of Indigenous peoples living in a region of present-day southwestern Ontario, as well as the wider socioeconomic , cultural, and historical contexts of those experiences. The qualitative research study that informs this paper was conducted with and at the request of an Indigenous...
Article
Full-text available
In the past decade, multiple compounding crises – ecological, racial injustices, ‘care crises’ and multiple recent crises related to the COVID-19 pandemic – have reinforced the powerful role of critical and social policy researchers to push back against ‘fake news’, ‘alternative facts’, and a post-truth era that denigrates science and evidence-base...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue of Families, Relationships and Societies brings together a selection of studies that reflect the myriad approaches to mobilising relationality in family and relationship research. In this short introduction, we reflect on the theoretical, methodological and empirical scholarship about relationality, with a particular focus on fam...
Article
Full-text available
Although the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spurred critical and much-needed attention to re-thinking policy approaches to child care and long-term elder care, little focus has been given to its implications for parental leave policies and parental benefits for the care of infants and young children. This article is about reconcep...
Article
Full-text available
This paper compares access to parental leave benefits in the four largest Canadian provinces –Québec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia between 2000 and 2016, using quantitative data from the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey. We show that inequalities in the receipt of benefits mirror and reinforce the structure of income and gender inequal...
Article
Purpose This research article explores several questions about assessing the impacts of fathers' parental leave take up and gender equality. We ask: How does the conceptual and contextual specificity of care and equality shape what we focus on, and how, when we study parental leave policies and their impacts? What and how are we measuring? Design/...
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses an enduring puzzle in fathering research: Why are care and breadwinning largely configured as binary oppositions rather than as relational and intra-acting concepts and practices, as is often the case in research on mothering? Guided by Margaret Somers’ historical sociology of concept formation, I conduct a Foucauldian-inspired...
Chapter
This volume provides an international perspective on parental leave policies in different countries, and goes beyond this to examine a range of issues in depth, aiming to stimulate thinking about possible futures and how policy might underpin them.
Article
This article lays out my process of developing an ecological and nonrepresentational approach for conducting an ethnography of family photos as objects of investigation, practices, and sites for the making and remaking of decolonizing stories and histories. It is rooted in a three-part project on family photographs: first, an ongoing project with a...
Book
The first edition of Do Men Mother? (2006) was awarded the John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award from the Canadian Sociological Association and remains one of the most widely cited books on primary caregiving fathers and stay-at-home fathers. This second edition of Do Men Mother? builds on interviews conducted between 2000 and 2004 with 10...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides a brief sketch of feminist epistemologies, their earlier iterations, and their contributions to relational epistemologies and methodologies, while also highlighting how they have sown the seeds for continuing feminist contributions to relational dimensions of knowledge making. It engages, through diffractive readings, with som...
Chapter
Full-text available
It was several decades ago that feminist, fatherhood, and family scholars began to argue that father involvement has significant generative benefits for families, for children’s development (e.g., Lamb 1981), for men (e.g., Chodorow 1978; Parke 1996), for women (Pleck 1985; Okin 1989), and for the attainment of gender equality and wider social chan...
Article
Full-text available
http://jir.sagepub.com/content/58/4/543.full.pdf+html Canada has two parental leave benefit programs for the care of a newborn or adopted child: a federal program, and, since 2006, a provincial program in Québec. Informed by a social reproduction framework, this article compares access to parental leave benefits between Québec and the rest of Cana...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a critical examination of the stay-at-home dad (SAHD) as a concept and set of practices in Canada and the United States (U.S.). It is informed by a feminist relational approach to practices of work and care, a genealogical approach to concepts, and by case study material from a 14-year qualitative and longitudinal research program o...
Chapter
Full-text available
Since the early 1990s, the numbers of single fathers has slowly and consistently increased in many western countries, including the United States and Canada. In this field of scholarship and research, there is some debate about the meanings and the everyday practices of “single fathers” and how these differ from, or are similar to, those of “single...
Chapter
Full-text available
The term and concept “stay-at-home dad“ (SAHD) are largely taken for granted in academic, everyday, and popular discourses. Increasing numbers of academic research projects and journal articles use the term to categorize fathers and families; journalists and bloggers often employ it as a shorthand description for fathers who leae fulltime paid work...
Article
Over the past half-century, enormous changes have occurred in gendered divisions of housework and child care across many countries, with a growing consensus that there is a slow but steady pace of change in gendered divisions of time and tasks but one that is combined with a puzzling persistence of gender differences in parental caregiving responsi...
Article
This article provides a critical overview of selected intersections of feminist theories and gender theories within fathering research and looks at a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to a diversity of fathering experiences, including differences of class, ethnicity, race, sexuality, and family forms. Although there are many over...
Conference Paper
The term “stay-at-home dad’ (SAHD) has become a taken-for-granted one in academic and popular discourses. Increasing numbers of cross-disciplinary research projects and journal articles use the term to categorize fathers and families; scholars and journalists often employ it as a short hand description for fathers who leave full-time leave paid wor...
Article
Cet article souligne l'absence du corps dans les études sur la division sexuelle des responsabilités parentales et soutient qu'on doit y intégrer le concept clé de l'embodiment masculin dans les soins proférés aux enfants. Issue d'une recherche qualitative qui se penche depuis vingt ans sur les mères pourvoyeuses économiques et les pères pourvoyeur...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides two case studies, a national one of Canada and a provincial one of Québec. In the case of Canada, statutory leave entitlements are divided between the federal and the provincial government. Of all the provinces of Canada, Québec is the only province that has made an important investment in the funding of childcare and parental...
Chapter
Full-text available
Sean (1992; Cambridge, England; stay-at-home father of two): I was passing a postman cycling by and I was pushing the push chair and holding Luke’s hand and I thought he’s given me a sort of ‘What a big sissy. A big sissy’! You know that may have been my response because you do interpret things according to your own level of comfort or discomfort t...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, Canadian fathers’ use of paid parental leave benefits rose dramatically. Yet very little is known about when and why these fathers take leave, and how couples negotiate who takes leave, when, and for how long. This article reports on a qualitative study in households where fathers took leave, carried out in the provinces of On...
Chapter
i>The Politics of Parental Leave Policies addresses how and why, and by whom, particular policies are created and subsequently developed in particular countries. It examines the factors that bring about variations in leave policy, covering fifteen countries in Europe and beyond.
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses the question of why there are persistent gender differences in the responsibility for children. It argues that understanding continuing gender divisions of domestic responsibility, particularly in the first year of parenting, requires attending to issues of identity; commitment; embodiment; deeply rooted socialization or habi...
Article
S'appuyant sur un projet de recherche d'une durée de quatre ans concernant des pères canadiens dispensateurs de soins de première ligne ainsi que sur deux projets récents sur la première année de soins prodigués au nourrisson, l'auteure attire l'attention sur plusieurs questions théoriques importantes pour l'étude de l'égalité des sexes et de la di...
Article
Full-text available
This article critically examines team and collaborative research as an 'academic mode of production'. Our main argument is that while theoretically qualitative social science research is rooted within a postfoundational epistemological paradigm, normative team-based research practices embody foundational principles. Team research relies on a divisi...
Article
Full-text available
This article grapples with the question of `what can be known?' about research subjects and how we can come to know them. Set against a backdrop of theoretical tensions over the concept of subjectivity in feminist theory, our article makes a three-fold argument. First, we argue that theoretical impasses between critical and constructed subjects can...
Article
Full-text available
Rooted in two qualitative research studies of stay-at-home fathers (70 Canadian and 21 Belgian) at the beginning of the twenty-first century, this article explores the innovative ways that families seek to create work-family balance in two countries where relevant social policies are still focused on the encouraging of private family-based solution...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on a provocative metaphor from an award-winning novel, this article argues that reflexivity can be conceived as three gossamer walls through which researchers construct knowledge from within three sets of relationships, including relations with: oneself (and the ghosts that haunt us); with research participants; and with one’s readers, audi...
Article
Full-text available
Within the wide body of scholarship on gender work and caring, sub-strands of research have grown tremendously in the past decade, including largely separate studies on fatherhood and embodiment. Drawing on a qualitative research project with Canadian fathers who self-identify as primary caregivers of their children, this article focuses on recover...
Book
More and more, fathers are deciding to stay at home and care for their children rather than work full-time outside of the home. More and more, Canadian families are lead by single fathers. Shining a spotlight on the lives of stay at home dads and single fathers, Do Men Mother? provides groundbreaking evidence of dramatic changes in mothering and fa...
Article
Full-text available
Rooted in a qualitative research project with 70 stay-at-home fathers in Canada, this paper explores the ways that work and family interact for fathers who “trade cash for care.” While fathers are at home, they also remain connected to traditionally masculine sources of identity such as paid work and they take on unpaid masculine self-provisioning...
Article
Full-text available
Dra wing on a qua litat ive s tud y of C ana dia n fat her s wh o se lf-d efin e as prim ary c are give rs, th is pa per exp lore s me n's unique challenges to the gendered politics of unpaid work. While recognizing that fathers' narratives can widen our understandings of what it means to care for and take on the emotional responsibility for childr...
Article
Full-text available
While the importance of being reflexive is acknowledged within social science research, the difficulties, practicalities and methods of doing it are rarely addressed. Thus, the implications of current theoretical and philosophical discussions about reflexivity, epistemology and the construction of knowledge for empirical socio-logical research prac...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on a qualitative research study conducted in Britain in the early to mid-1990s with heterosexual-couple households with dependent children, the article explores domestic responsibility for children through a discussion of two distinct and related conceptions of domestic responsibility, emotional responsibility and interhousehold responsibil...
Article
This paper explores the persistent link between women and domestic responsibility, a link that has been heavily documented and yet much less frequently theorised. Drawing on a qualitative research project with a 'critical case' study sample of couples trying to share housework and childcare in Britain in the early 1990s the paper argues that part o...
Chapter
Full-text available
For more than two decades, authors from many disciplinary perspectives have charted and documented the work and parenting lives of women and men in Europe and North America and have left an indisputable trail of evidence to confirm that, in spite of women’s increasing labour market participation, women continue to take on most of the household’s wo...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on qualitative research with 23 British dual earner couples, this article explores theoretical issues of gender differences and gender equality as they relate specifically to an understanding and analysis of women and men's contributions to household work and parenting. It is argued that the relationship between women's greater contribution...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
This Edward Elgar Handbook features contributions from leading leave policy and social policy scholars, providing a comprehensive overview of conceptual and methodological trends and challenges in leave policy research, state-of-the-art findings on leave policy determinants and outcomes, as well as up-to-date knowledge on leave policy developments in different regions around the world. The Handbook is divided into five main sections: 1) conceptual and analytical challenges in leave policy research; 2) the politics and ideas of leave policies; 3) outcomes of leave policies; 4) leave policies in comparative perspective; 5) gaps and the future of leave policy research and development. It provides both a comprehensive overview of the field of leave policy research and in-depth analyses of particular countries around the globe. Chapters engage with both past and future leave policy developments across the world, and most importantly, encourage a critical debate on how leave policies should respond to the challenges posed by permanent (politics of) austerity, the rise of right-wing populism, a new economy marked by increasingly precarious, underinsured and nonstandard employment, migration flows, the social and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, growing financial strains on parents and widening global inequalities in general. The Handbook aims to initiate a global debate and broader thinking about the inter-connection of leave policy design and inequalities, and to ask whether there is a case to re-configure leave policy as a social right.
Project
This is a longstanding project that began about 30 years ago. It includes two editions of my book Do Men Mother? - and a series of pieces (articles, book chapters, and book forwards) that study changing practices of mothering and fathering - while also rethinking and revisioning conceptual configurations and methodological approached that guide fathering research. Some of my central concerns include theorizing care and breadwinning, embodiment, masculinities, fathering and parental responsibilities, the community as an institutional arena, and the ethic of care.
Project
We document who, in terms of gender and social class, has access to paid benefits in Québec and in Canada.