Andrea Corradini

Andrea Corradini
Fondazione Edmund Mach - Istituto Agrario San Michele All'Adige | Fondazione Mach · Animal Ecology Research Group (DBEM EA)

PhD

About

19
Publications
11,013
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45
Citations
Introduction
Passionate about large carnivore ecology, I have focused my studies on grey wolf, Eurasian lynx and brown bear so far. I studied the effects of human disturbance on the space use, movement, and connectivity of brown bears in the Alps for my PhD at the University of Trento, in partnership with the Edmund Mach Foundation and the Stelvio National Park.
Additional affiliations
November 2017 - present
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Ecological connectivity in the Alpine anthropic matrix: natural reserves and corridors for the conservation of brown bear in the Alps (ABC - AlpBearConnect)
December 2015 - April 2017
Association for the conservation of biological diversity
Position
  • Technician
Description
  • WOLFLIFE project - LIFE13NAT/RO/000205 – Implementing best practices for the in-situ conservation of the species Canis lupus in the Eastern Carpathians (www.wolflife.eu)
Education
October 2012 - April 2016
University of Florence
Field of study
  • Wildlife and environmental management
September 2009 - October 2012
University of Florence
Field of study
  • Wildlife managment

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Background Human disturbance alters animal movement globally and infrastructure, such as roads, can act as physical barriers that impact behaviour across multiple spatial scales. In ungulates, roads can particularly hamper key ecological processes such as dispersal and migration, which ensure functional connectivity among populations, and may be pa...
Article
Full-text available
Recent events related to the measures taken to control the spread of the Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) reduced human mobility (i.e. anthropause), potentially opening connectivity opportunities for wildlife populations. In the Italian Alps, brown bears have recovered after reintroduction within a complex anthropogenic matrix, but failed to establish a me...
Article
Full-text available
The global lockdown to mitigate COVID-19 pandemic health risks has altered human interactions with nature. Here, we report immediate impacts of changes in human activities on wildlife and environmental threats during the early lockdown months of 2020, based on 877 qualitative reports and 332 quantitative assessments from 89 different studies. Hundr...
Article
Full-text available
Humans profoundly affect animal distributions by directly competing for space, not only transforming, but actively using their habitat. Anthropogenic disturbance is usually measured via structural proxies such as infrastructure and land use that overlook the impact of human presence, or functional disturbance. In this study, we propose a methodolog...
Poster
Full-text available
Since the first reintroductions in the early 2000s, the Alpine bear population has been continuously monitored and genetically sampled through the joint effort of various authorities. This long-term monitoring, combined with the advent of new technologies, has produced a comprehensive and ecologically diverse dataset. However, the high amount of da...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Temporal segregation is common amongst coexisting species, but rarely studied in multi-predator – multi-prey systems in Europe. The Romanian Carpathians provide a good opportunity for studying such mechanisms, as three apex predators and several wild ungulate species naturally co-occur. Our study aimed to assess diel activity overlap of i) wolf vs....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The study of habitat selection of a given species, in a different environmental context, represents a major step to enhance the knowledge of that species ecology. Although grey wolf (Canis lupus) and Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) ecology has been largely studied across Europe, to date, no systematic study has been done in Romania. This study, entirely...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Camera trapping requires extensive effort to gather meaningful data, especially for large carnivores. Understanding which factors affect capture rates can have a positive effect on the amount of information collected. In the present pilot study, as part of the WOLFLIFE project (LIFE13 NAT/RO/000205), we aimed to describe the effects of camera place...
Poster
Full-text available
The wolf has one of the widest distributions among terrestrial mammals. Flexible and opportunist, it is well adapted to the different types of habitats, therefore, complex predator-prey interactions occur throughout its entire range. Understanding the extent of these interactions can be achieved through an exhaustive analysis of an adequate number...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Modern molecular genetic methods have revolutionized wildlife research and monitoring within past years. High-resolution marker systems such as microsatellites and SNP-genotyping technology in combination with the use of non-invasively collected environmental samples allow to count individuals, assess population connectivity, reconstruct family str...
Thesis
Full-text available
The grey wolf (Canis lupus) is probably one of the most studied species in Europe. To date, despite the large number of projects that have been addressed to it, few studies have actually been carried out in the Romanian Carpathian. This pioneering study, entirely developed within the WOLFLIFE project (LIFE13 NAT/RO/000205), aimed to assess the ecol...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Large carnivores can represent a threat to livestock and traditional farming methods if there are not effective management strategies to cope with potential encounters. In our study area (1200 km2), located in the Central Eastern Carpathian Mountains, we investigate both the husbandry practices and ecological variables that could affect such confli...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Currently, because of the rapid environmental changes, one of the biggest challenges in Nature Conservation is to decrease the loss of biodiversity and to prevent the extinction of species whose dynamic is strongly influenced by human activities. Conservation objectives can be difficult to reach if the management measures are not supported by robus...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The relationship between wolf (Canis lupus) and lynx (Lynx lynx) in the Romanian Carpathians is still unclear. To date, no studies have been made but, due to the high cost of radio tracking, preliminary studies based on signs of presence can provide useful information. This study, located in the Eastern Carpathian Mountains (Romania), was carried o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of this study is to present preliminary results achieved during a winter session of camera trapping carried out by the WOLFLIFE project (LIFE13NAT/RO/000205). The study area is 1200 km2 and located in the Eastern Carpathians, Romania. 14 camera trapping stations were chosen opportunistically and determined by the spatial distribution of wol...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), one of the large carnivores present in Europe together with wolf (Canis lupus) and bear (Ursus arctos), was exterminated in several part of Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries by human persecution and environmental changes. Afterwards, with a widespread reintroduction program, it has recolonized part of the old area...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I want to get the utilization distribution (UD) with data collected sequentially in time

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
LINK PROJECT: github.com/andreacorra/wolfdiet The grey wolf (Canis lupus) has one of the widest distributions among terrestrial mammals. Flexible and opportunist, it is well adapted to the different types of habitats, therefore, complex predator-prey interactions occur throughout its entire range. Understanding the extent of these interactions can be achieved through an exhaustive analysis of an adequate number of existing studies on wolves’ feeding ecology. Access to those studies is often hindered by, among other factors, language barriers, and overcoming such factors would ensure the premises for knowledge development concerning the wolf’s foraging behaviour. Consequently, this information could support other research areas such as human-wildlife conflicts, disease transmission, and game management. We present an Open Access spatial database that contains bibliographic information on wolf’s diet throughout the species range. The database is developed in PostgreSQL and is currently being enhanced and updated. The diet information is freely accessible in R, Excel, or GIS environment. The aim is to encourage researchers to engage in data collection, foster collaboration, and emphasize the knowledge about wolf foraging habits. Ultimately, we want to make it available in other languages (e.g. Chinese, Russian, Hindi) to facilitate knowledge sharing worldwide. Any researcher interested in collaborating could directly contact the authors via ResearchGate or email worldwolfdiet@gmail.com
Project
The PhD project aims at obtaining a realistic prediction of the distribution of the brown bear population in Trentino/Central Alps, and of the potential connectivity across the Alpine-Dinaric metapopulation, in presence of large stretches of under-utilized areas and, in contrast, hot-spots with intense anthropic use. These predictions will be compared with possible future scenarios of increased/decreased structural connectivity.
Project
WOLFLIFE project (LIFE13NAT/RO/000205 is co-financed by the European Commission through the LIFE+ Nature programme and will be carried out between 01.07.2014 – 30.04.2018. The aim of the project is to maintain a viable population of wolves in the Carpathian Mountains by strengthening the management and promoting the human – wolf coexistence. The project is implemented by the Environmental Protection Agency Vrancea, in partnership with ACDB (The Association for the Conservation of Biological Diversity), the Environmental Protection Agency Harghita and the Environmental Protection Agency Covasna. The targeted area of the project is located in the central and southern part of the Eastern Carpathians, spreading across 6 counties (Vrancea, Covasna, Harghita, Bacău, Neamţ, Mureş) and consisting of 18 Natura 2000 sites. The main objectives of the project are: - to improve the management of the species, by documenting, laying the groundwork and developing the participatory national action plan for wolf conservation; - to implement demonstrative preventive solutions for managing human – wolf conflicts by transferring best practices to stakeholder groups, mainly represented by farmers and hunters; - to prevent the wolf population decline by reducing mortality, limiting the competition with other species, reducing poaching and promoting habitat and protected areas connectivity; - to transfer to institutions, organizations and individuals involved in wolf management the best practices that are necessary to ensure peaceful co-existence and a balance between the conservation needs of the wolf and those related to the sustainable development of local communities; - change the public perception and attitudes regarding the wolf through an awareness campaign.