Andrea Adams

Andrea Adams
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Earth Research Institute

Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology

About

28
Publications
4,553
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114
Citations
Introduction
I am an interdisciplinary ecologist. My current research addresses ecological and socioecological questions surrounding conservation translocations, including amphibians and grizzly bears. My work draws upon my experience in natural history, endangered species management, amphibian disease ecology, and government administration. More information about my work is available at https://www.andreajoyadams.com/
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2008 - October 2015
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Position
  • Wildlife Biologist
Description
  • Species lead for the federally endangered Santa Barbara County Distinct Population Segment of the California tiger salamander.
Education
September 2010 - March 2017
University of California, Santa Barbara
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has contributed to amphibian declines globally, but drivers of outbreaks vary locally. Here we explore the role of drought in population and host-disease dynamics of the endangered stream-breeding foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii). In central California (...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians are declining globally, and the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes the disease chytridiomycosis, has been the culprit in many of these declines. In the Mediterranean region of Baja California, Mexico—a biodiversity hotspot—native amphibians are also in decline, and Bd is present. To determine which factors...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Climate change uncertainty poses serious challenges to conservation efforts. One emerging conservation strategy is to identify and conserve climate change refugia: areas relatively buffered from contemporary climate change that enable persistence of valued resources. This management paradigm may be pursued at broad scales by leveraging exi...
Article
Full-text available
Effectively planning conservation introductions involves assessing the suitability of both donor and recipient populations, including the landscape of disease risk. Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has caused extensive amphibian declines globally and may hamper reintroduction attempts. To determin...
Article
Species reintroductions involve considerable uncertainty, especially in highly altered landscapes. Historical, geographic, and taxonomic analogies can help reduce this uncertainty by enabling conservationists to better assess habitat suitability in proposed reintroduction sites. We illustrate this approach using the example of the California grizzl...
Poster
Full-text available
El hongo patógeno quítrido Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), es de los principales factores responsables de la disminución de especies de anfibios a escala mundial. Los impactos del hongo se ven fluctuados por variables tanto bióticas como abióticas. Diversos estudios han encontrado que la temperatura tiene un papel importante en la ecología de...
Article
Full-text available
Chytridiomycosis is caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and is regarded as one of the most significant threats to global amphibian populations. In México, Bd was first reported in 2003 and has now been documented in 13 states. We visited 33 localities and swabbed 199 wild-caught anurans from 7 species (5 native, 2 exot...
Article
Full-text available
As extinctions continue across the globe, conservation biologists are turning to species reintroduction programs as one optimistic tool for addressing the biodiversity crisis. For repatriation to become a viable strategy, fundamental prerequisites include determining the causes of declines and assessing whether the causes persist in the environment...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater biodiversity is imperiled across the globe, and multiple stressors such as habitat alteration, non-native species invasion, disease, and climate change can act in concert to threaten vulnerable taxa. The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes the disease chytridiomycosis, is one of the causative factor...
Article
Full-text available
Rana aurora is native to extreme northwestern coastal California, coastal Oregon, and Washington west of the Cascade Range, and southwestern British Columbia (Pearl 2005. In Lannoo [ed.], Amphibian Declines: The Conservation Status of United States Species, pp. 528–529. University of California Press, Berkeley, California). On 9 December 2010, we w...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has been identified as the primary factor in many amphibian declines around the world, yet its effect on lowland populations of California anurans, such as the foothill yellow-legged frog (Rana boylii) is poorly understood. R. boylii has declined from more than half of its former range, but ha...
Article
Full-text available
Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understandi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the fall of 2013 we observed dead and dying juvenile foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) in the Bay Area's Alameda Creek, a location where annual amphibian breeding censuses have been conducted since 2003. We attribute the die-off to an outbreak of chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), in whi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Current Species Status The Santa Barbara County Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of the California tiger salamander (Ambystoma californiense), was listed as endangered throughout its entire range in 2000 under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. The DPS is endemic to the northern portion of Santa Barbara County, California, and current...
Conference Paper
Southern California’s anuran diversity is dominated by species of special conservation concern. While many causative factors have been implicated in declines of anurans in California, none are able to adequately account for population declines in backcountry areas removed from predominating anthropogenic impacts, except disease. In California and e...
Conference Paper
Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has been a major contributing factor to worldwide declines in amphibian diversity. Interspecific and intraspecific variation in the susceptibility and severity of Bd infection have been documented; however, few studies have examined long-term persistence of amphibi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 2008, we sampled California red-legged frogs (Rana draytonii) and bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) for Chytridiomycosis on Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California. Chytridiomycosis is caused by an infection of the skin by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). This disease has been shown to be a significant factor in mortali...
Conference Paper
In 2008, we sampled California red-legged frogs (Rana draytonii) and bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) for Chytridiomycosis on Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California. Chytridiomycosis is caused by an infection of the skin by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). This disease has been shown to be a significant factor in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is required by section 4(c)(2) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act) to conduct a status review of each listed species at least once every 5 years. The purpose of a 5-year review is to evaluate whether or not the species’ status has changed since it was listed (or since the most recent...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Examining amphibian distributions and the causes of declines while facilitating reintroduction planning throughout California.