André Pellerin

André Pellerin
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev | bgu · Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

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32
Publications
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636
Citations

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) release to the atmosphere from thawing permafrost contributes significantly to global CH4 emissions. However, constraining the effects of thaw that control the production and emission of CH4 is needed to anticipate future Arctic emissions. Here are presented robust rate measurements of CH4 production and cycling in a region of rapidly...
Article
The marine sulfate inventory represents the largest standing pool of electron acceptors, which, via microbial sulfate reduction, is responsible for roughly half of the organic matter mineralization globally in marine sediments. In addition to the oxidation of buried organic matter, sulfate reduction can be coupled to the oxidation of methane migrat...
Article
Full-text available
Sediment-hosted marine sulfur cycling has played a significant role in regulating Earth’s surface chemistry over our planet’s history. Microbially-mediated reactions involving sulfur are often accompanied by sulfur isotope fractionation that, in turn, is captured by sulfate and sulfide minerals, providing the opportunity to track changes in the mic...
Article
Sedimentary pyrite formation links the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur, and iron, which, in turn, modulate the redox state of the planet’s surficial environment over geological time scales. Accordingly, the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of pyrite has been widely employed as a geochemical tool to probe the evolution of ocean chem...
Article
The early evolution of life on Earth was intimately coupled with the evolution of ocean chemical composition and redox conditions in Archean ocean. However, the measurements of chemical and isotopic compositions of Archean sedimentary rocks does not provide sufficient information for understanding the biogeochemical processes that characterized oce...
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Pyrite formation in marine sedimentary environments plays a key role in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur and iron, regulating Earth’s surface redox balance over geological time scales. The sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite is one of the major geochemical tools for investigating early diagenetic processes in modern marine sedim...
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Temperature influences microbiological growth and catabolic rates. Between 15 and 35 °C the growth rate and cell specific sulfate reduction rate of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfococcus multivorans increased with temperature. Sulfur isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction decreased with increasing temperature from 27.2 ‰ at 15 °C to 1...
Article
Oxidative sulphur cycling is pervasive in marine sediments, replenishing the oxidised sulphur reservoir via re-oxidation of sulphide. An active, yet cryptic, sulphur cycle has been proposed to operate at depth beneath the sulphate-methane transition (SMT), fuelled by simultaneous sulphide oxidation and sulphate reduction under low-sulphate conditio...
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The marine sulphur cycle is driven by the reduction of sulphate to sulphide coupled to microbial decomposition of organic matter. The sulphide produced by sulphate reduction may either react with Fe or organic matter to be buried as pyrite or organic sulphur, respectively; or may be oxidised through different pathways and intermediates. The amount...
Article
The pyrite sulfur isotope record of the 1.98 Ga Zaonega Formation in the Onega Basin, NW Russia, has played a central role in understanding ocean-atmosphere composition and inferring worldwide fluctuations of the seawater sulfate reservoir during the pivotal times of the Paleoproterozoic Era. That, in turn, has led to a concept that Earth's atmosph...
Article
Arctic fjord sediments of Svalbard receive terrestrial material from glacial runoff and organic matter from marine primary productivity. Organic carbon mineralization proceeds primarily through sulfate and iron reduction in the fjord sediment. The ongoing retreat of glaciers in the high Arctic is altering the input of glacial material to the fjords...
Article
The Gypsum Hill (GH) springs on Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian high Arctic are host to chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur‐oxidizing streamers that flourish in the high Arctic winter in water temperatures from −1.3‐7°C with ~8% salinity in a high Arctic winter environment with air temperatures commonly less than −40°C and an average annual air tempe...
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Full-text available
The accumulation of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere and oceans in the late Archean had profound implications for the planet's biogeochemical evolution. Oxygen impacts sulfur cycling through the oxidation of sulfide minerals and the production of sulfate for microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). The isotopic signature of sulfur species preserved in the ge...
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Full-text available
Recent climate warming is contributing to permafrost degradation and vegetation change; however, little is known about the legacy of Holocene landscape change on contemporary soil biogeochemical conditions. In permafrost soils of northwestern Canada, widespread permafrost degradation occurred during the early Holocene warm interval and its impacts...
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A sulfide-oxidizing microorganism, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus (DA), generates a consistent enrichment of sulfur-34 (34 S) in the produced sulfate of +12.5 per mil or greater. This observation challenges the general consensus that the microbial oxidation of sulfide does not result in large 34 S enrichments and suggests that sedimentary sulfides an...
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Full-text available
Microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction to sulfide is a predominant terminal pathway of organic matter mineralization in the anoxic seabed. Chemical or microbial oxidation of the produced sulfide establishes a complex network of pathways in the sulfur cycle, leading to intermediate sulfur species and partly back to sulfate. The intermediates incl...
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Salt marshes are complex systems comprising of ephemerally flooded, vegetated platforms hydraulically fed by tidal creeks. Where drainage is poor, formation of saline-water ponds can occur. Within East Anglian (UK) salt marshes, two types of sediment chemistries can be found beneath these ponds; iron-rich sediment, which is characterized by high fe...
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The sulfur isotope record provides key insight into the history of Earth's redox conditions. A detailed understanding of the metabolisms driving this cycle, and specifically microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), is crucial for accurate paleoenvironmental reconstructions. This includes a precise knowledge of the step-specific sulfur isotope effects dur...
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The study of sulfate reduction below the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) in marine sediments requires strict precautions to avoid sulfate contamination from seawater sulfate or from sulfide oxidation during handling. We experimented with different methods of sampling porewater sulfate and found that modifications to our sampling procedure reduced...
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Separating the contributions of anaerobic oxidation of methane and organoclastic sulfate reduction in the overall sedimentary sulfur cycle of marine sediments has benefited from advances in isotope biogeochemistry. Particularly, the coupling of sulfur and oxygen isotopes measured in the residual sulfate pool (δ18OSO4 vs. δ34SSO4). Yet, some importa...
Article
Sulfur (S) isotope fractionation by sulfate-reducing microorganisms is a direct manifestation of their respiratory metabolism. This fractionation is apparent in the substrate (sulfate) and waste (sulfide) produced. The sulfate-reducing metabolism responds to variability in the local environment, with the response determined by the underlying genoty...
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Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is a microbial catabolic pathway that preferentially processes less massive sulfur isotopes relative to their heavier counterparts. This sulfur isotope fractionation is recorded in ancient sedimentary rocks and is generally considered to reflect a phenotypic response to environmental variations rather than to evoluti...
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The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate δ34S and Δ33S dataset exhibits the distinct isotopic signatures of microbial sulfate reductio...
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In recent years, endostromatolites, which consist of finely laminated calcite columns that grow orthogonally within millimeter- to centimeter-thick fissures in limestone bedrock outcrops, have been discovered in dolomitic outcrops in the Haughton impact structure region, Devon Island, Canada. The growth mechanism of the endostromatolites is believe...
Article
Endostromatolites (cf. fissure calcretes), which possess microbial evidence for a biogenic origin, are also thought to preserve isotopic biosignatures. In this study, a multi-proxy approach combining (micro)morphological, geochemical and isotopic analyses of middle Holocene age endostromatolites within sub-horizontal fissures in dolomitic limestone...
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Full-text available
This study examines the physical and geochemical properties of near-surface sediments, as well as the geochemical and stable O-H-C isotope composition of (ground) surface waters in and around the Haughton impact structure region (Devon Island, Nunavut) to determine the types of weathering (mechanical, (bio) chemical) and their relative contribution...

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