András Tartally

András Tartally
University of Debrecen · Department of Evolutionary Zoology and Human Biology

PhD

About

91
Publications
19,815
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Introduction
I am especially interested in myrmecology. Recently I have been working on the interactions between ants and Laboulbeniales fungi; on the relationship of the Maculinea butterflies with their host ants in the Carpathian Basin and Denmark; and on the spreading of the invasive garden ant (Lasius neglectus) and its effect on the native ant communities in Hungary. I have learned the GC/MS and microsatellite techniques in Denmark. See more detals here: http://web.unideb.hu/tartally/
Additional affiliations
September 2010 - present
University of Debrecen
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2010 - present
University of Debrecen
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Zootaxonomy Field courses Myrmecology The analysis of animal populations and communities Supervision of master and PhD students
June 2009 - May 2011
University of Copenhagen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Marie Curie fellowship
Education
September 1994 - June 2008
University of Debrecen
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (91)
Book
The number of known ant species in Hungary has increased in the last decades, due to more and more intensive efforts by local researchers. On the basis of a recent checklist, 126 ant species live in Hungary is. However, besides simple list of species (i.e. checklists), no countrywide, extensive sets of data have been published on the distribution,...
Article
Full-text available
Hagnosa longicapillata, gen. nov., sp. nov, is described and illustrated from wooden building materials collected in Hungary and from pure culture. This species has been collected exclusively from indoor environments, where it was quite common. The ascocarps develop in a thick layer of brown, woolly mats of mycelia. The ostiolar region of the perit...
Article
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Exploitation of organisms by multiple parasite species is common in nature, but interactions among parasites have rarely been studied. Myrmica ants are rich in parasites. Among others, the ectoparasitic Rickia wasmannii fungus and the parasitic caterpillars of myrmecophilous Phengaris butterflies often infect the same Myrmica colonies. In this stud...
Preprint
Full-text available
Exploitation of organisms by multiple parasite species is common in nature, but interactions among parasites have rarely been studied. Myrmica ants are rich in parasites. Among others, the ectoparasitic Rickia wasmannii fungus and the socially parasitic caterpillars of myrmecophilous Phengaris butterflies often infect the same Myrmica colonies. In...
Article
Full-text available
Parasitism-generated negative effects on ant societies are multifaceted, implying individual and colony-level responses. Though laboratory based evidence shows that the sublethal fungus Rickia wasmannii is responsible for physiological and behavioral responses that may negatively affect individual workers’ resilience and life expectancy in Myrmica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Parasitism-generated negative effects on ant societies are multifaceted, implying individual and colony-level responses. Though laboratory based evidence shows that the sublethal fungus Rickia wasmannii is responsible for physiological and behavioral responses that may negatively affect individual workers’ resilience and life expectancy in Myrmica...
Article
Full-text available
Ants (Hymenoptera: Forimicidae) are exceedingly common in nature. They constitute a conspicuous part of the terrestrial animal biomass and are also considered common ecosystem engineers. Due to their key role in natural habitats, they are at the basis of any nature conservation policy. Thus, the first step in developing adequate conservation and ma...
Article
A hangyák (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) a fajszámuk, az egyedszámuk, a fejlett társas viselkedésük és az ökológiai hatásuk tekintetében egyaránt kiemelkedő jelentőségű rovarcsoport. Gyakoriságuk és társas szerveződésük okán a szakma és a laikus közönség tagjai gyakorta említik őket, akár nemzetség- vagy faji szinten. Ennek ellenére a hangyáknak a mai n...
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The socially parasitic Alcon blue butterfly (Phengaris alcon) starts its larval stage by feeding on the seeds of gentians, after which it completes development in the nests of suitable Myrmica ant species. The host plant and host ant species can differ at the population level within a region, and local adaptation is common, but some host switches a...
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In ants, individuals live in tightly integrated units (colonies) and work collectively for its success. In such groups, stable intraspecific variation in behaviour within or across contexts (personality) can occur at two levels: individuals and colonies. This paper examines how colony size and nestmate density influence the collective exploratory b...
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Land use intensification is a general threat to biodiversity, but many species depend on low‐intensity agricultural ecosystems. One example is European mountain meadow ecosystems, traditionally managed by hay harvesting or livestock grazing. Abandoning management often causes population declines, local extinctions and biotic homogenisation in these...
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Fungal species identities are often based on morphological features, but current molecular phylogenetic and other approaches almost always lead to the discovery of multiple species in single morpho-species. According to the morphological species concept, the ant-parasitic fungus Rickia wasmannii (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) is a single species with...
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Laboulbeniales (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniomycetes) are obligate ectoparasitic fungi of arthropods with a worldwide distribution. Their effects on host physiology and behaviour as well as their ecology have recently gained wider attention. One aspect that is virtually unknown regarding Laboulbeniales and arthropod-associated fungi in general, is how ab...
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The range of hosts exploited by a parasite is determined by several factors, including host availability, infectivity and exploitability. Each of these can be the target of natural selection on both host and parasite, which will determine the local outcome of interactions, and potentially lead to coevolution. However, geographical variation in host...
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The introduction of non-native animals occasionally results in the co-introduction of their microbial symbionts or parasites. The trade of exotic pets and zoo animals has inadvertently introduced several parasitic species to countries where they are non-native. Both the presence of suitable native hosts and opportunity for dispersal determine wheth...
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Arthropod-parasitic fungi of the order Laboulbeniales are known to exhibit specialization to individual host taxa in most cases. Some species exhibit ecological specificity to multiple, often unrelated hosts in certain microhabitats; and often position specificity to different host body parts. The myrmecophilous Rickia wasmannii (Ascomycota: Laboul...
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Public awareness has been raised on the importance of natural history and academic collections for science and society in a time when reduced financial support and staff cuts are prevalent. In the field of biology, new species and new interspecies associations are constantly discovered by making use of museum collections, digitalised materials or c...
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The interactions of ectosymbiotic Laboulbeniales (Ascomycota) fungi and their hosts are rather understudied. Rickia wasmannii Cavara is a common ant-associated Laboulbeniales species that has been reported in 17 countries of Europe, and frequently infects Myrmica scabrinodis Nylander, 1846 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), a common ant species host, in hi...
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The main goal of our research was to carry out a comprehensive study on the obligatorily myrmecophilous Maculinea alcon (Denis & Schiffermüller) whose taxonomy has remained highly debated despite the fact that Maculinea Van Eecke species are some of the most intensively studied insects in Europe. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between the d...
Article
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The protected Maculinea arion is an obligate myrmecophilous butterfly (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae). Fourth instar larvae and pupae develop in Myrmica (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) ant nests. Host ant specificity varies geographically, and knowledge of the local host ant species is important to understand the biogeography and evolution of this species, and...
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Myrmecophilous arthropods and their manifold relations to host ants are interesting from an evolutionary perspective. Rickia wasmannii is an ectoparasitic fungus belonging to the Laboulbeniales order. Here, we show that inquiline mites can become infected by R. wasmannii, which was thought to be restricted to the genus Myrmica (Hymenoptera: Formici...
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The invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) has been spreading rapidly in Europe ever since the 1990s. This ant established enormous supercolonies in many European cities and poses a serious threat to the local native faunas. The spread of this species has not slowed down in the last decades, but in the recent years the sizes...
Article
A new distribution record for Prolixandromyces triandrus Santam. (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) is presented from the B€ ukk Mountains in northeastern Hungary, from the host species Velia (Plesiovelia) saulii Tamanini, 1947 (Heteroptera: Veliidae). Hitherto, this fungal parasite had only been observed in the western Mediterranean region and the Macar...
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Among the many associations between fungi and ants, the associations involving the ectoparasitic fungi Laboulbeniales (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) have remained largely enigmatic even today. However, for two of the six ant-parasitizing Laboulbeniales, it has been found that parasitism is correlated with diminished survival of their hosts, especiall...
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Full-text available
Rickia wasmannii Cavara (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) is an ectoparasitic fungus infecting Myrmica ants. Ant-parasitic Laboulbeniales and their interactions with the hosts have been in the focus of several studies. To assess the effects of these fungi, comparison of infected and uninfected or completely treated ants are needed. So far, treating Labo...
Article
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The rare socially parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon occurs in two forms, which are characteristic of hygric or xeric habitats and which exploit different host plants and host ants. The status of these two forms has been the subject of considerable controversy. Populations of the two forms are usually spatially distinct, but at Răscruci in Romania...
Data
Combined supplementary information Table S1. Multilocus genotypes of samples at the seven microsatellite loci used for analysis (raw data). Table S2. Summary diversity indices and F-statistics for loci analyzed in Maculinea alcon. Table S3. Linkage (genotypic) disequilibrium for Transylvanian Maculinea alcon populations. Additional Analysis S1. Bay...
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Rickia lenoirii has been reported in seven localities in the Carpathian Basin, six in Hungary and one in Romania, on Messor structor (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) host specimens. This is the first occurrence of this fungus in two new (Pannonian and Continental) biogeographic regions. According to our findings, the northernmost (47°31’33.01”N) known occ...
Article
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Laboulbeniales is one of the most peculiar orders of Ascomycota. These fungi are characterized by an ectoparasitic life-style on arthropods, determinate growth, lack of an asexual stage, high species richness, and intractability to culture. The order Laboulbeniales, sister to Pyxidiophorales, has only recently been assigned a separate class, the La...
Article
Full-text available
The rare socially parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon occurs in two forms, which are characteristic of hygric or xeric habitats, and which exploit different host plants and host ants. The status of these two forms has been the subject of considerable controversy. Populations of the two forms are usually spatially distinct, but at Răscruci in Romani...
Article
Full-text available
The rare socially parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon occurs in two forms, which are characteristic of hygric or xeric habitats, and which exploit different host plants and host ants. The status of these two forms has been the subject of considerable controversy. Populations of the two forms are usually spatially distinct, but at Răscruci in Romani...
Article
Full-text available
In Europe, both Maculinea alcon and M. teleius frequently co-occur inhabiting humid meadows. Although their parasitic life cycle is similar, ecological differences have been demonstrated between them: (i) spatial distribution of their eggs is different, and (ii) M. alcon is a cuckoo species, while M. teleius is predatory. The aim of the present stu...
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Abstract: Laboulbenia formicarum Thaxt. (Ascomycota: Laboulbeniales) fungus is native to N-America and has just been recorded from Europe from the invasive ant Lasius neglectus van Loon, Boomsma et Andrásfalvy, 1990 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The ant is well known from Hungary but the fungus is not known from there. We checked the infection of L. f...
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The order Laboulbeniales (Fungi, Ascomycota) is a little-studied group of microscopic ectoparasites of invertebrates, mostly insects. The effects of Laboulbeniales species on their hosts are mostly unknown. Rickia wasmannii Cavara, 1899 is a common Laboulbeniales fungus occurring in Europe and is currently known to be a parasite of at least eight M...
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The order Laboulbeniales comprises more than 2000 species in about 140 genera (Santamaria, 2001; Weir & Black-well, 2005; Kirk et al., 2008). They are obligate ectoparasites of arthropods, and approximately 80% of the described Laboulbe-niales species parasitize Coleoptera species (Santamaria, 2001; Henk et al., 2003; Weir & Blackwell, 2005). In th...
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AbstractThe taxonomy of the myrmecophilous Maculinea alcon group (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) is highly debated. The host-plant and host-ant usage of these butterflies have conventionally been important in their identification. Maculinea ‘rebeli’ has generally been considered to be the xerophilous form of Ma. alcon (Ma. alcon X hereafter) with Gentian...
Data
Full-text available
Larvae and pupae of the obligately myrme-cophilous social parasites Microdon myrmicae (Diptera: Syrphidae) and Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) were found using exclusively Myrmica aloba (Hymenop-tera: Formicidae) host ants in NE-Portugal. Ichneumon eu-merus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) was also found developing in Ma. alcon pupae in nests...
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Larvae of the obligate myrmecophilous social parasite Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) were found exclusively using Myrmica aloba (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) ant hosts in NE-Portugal. This is the first record of the host ant usage of any Maculinea species in Portugal, and of any Maculinea using M. aloba nests. These results on such periphera...
Article
1. In 2002 Microdon myrmicae, a social parasite of Myrmica ants, was taxonomically separated from Microdon mutabilis. The original study in the U.K. found Microdon myrmicae to be specific to one ant species, Myrmica scabrinodis, yet it became apparent that the range of Microdon myrmicae includes at least the western Palaearctic. 2. Current knowledg...
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The concept of animal personalities has recently become of major interest as researchers began to wonder why animals within a given population show consistent behaviour across situations and contexts, what led to the evolution of such behavioural inflexibility and what mechanisms might underlie the phenomenon. A recent model explains individual dif...
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Maculinea nausithous (Bergsträsser, 1779) was recently discovered in two parts of the Tran-sylvanian basin. External characters of these populations completely agree with the original description of Maculinea nausithous kijevensis (Sheljuzhko, 1928) and show some small but constant differences against the Central European nominotypic populations. S...
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Invasive ant species represent a serious threat to many ecological communities, often causing decreases in the abundance, species richness and diversity of native ants and other arthropods. The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus VAN LOON, BOOMSMA & ANDRÁSFALVY, 1990, is an invasive tramp species that forms dense supercolonies. We studied the eco...
Article
1. The influence of infestation of the larval host plant Gentiana cruciata on the egg-laying preferences of the xerophilous ecotype of Alcon Blue butterfly (Maculinea alcon) was studied in a semi-dry grassland area (Aggtelek Karst Region, Northern Hungary). 2. We examined whether oviposition patterns of females differed when Gentiana cruciata stems...
Article
Full-text available
1. The influence of infestation of the larval host plant Gentiana cruciata on the egg-laying preferences of the xerophilous ecotype of Alcon Blue butterfly (Maculinea alcon) was studied in a semi-dry grassland area (Aggtelek Karst Region, Northern Hungary). 2. We examined whether oviposition patterns of females differed when Gentiana cruciata stems...
Article
Full-text available
Larvae of Maculinea butterflies are obligate social parasites of Myrmica ant nests. The various butterfly populations often have different host ant species. A review is given about the known host ant usage of the Maculinea populations in the Carpathian Basin and about the other rare (e.g. ichneumon) species found with these butterflies and their ho...
Article
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Eleven ant species were recorded at Gyűrűfű (Hungary) in a preliminary study, which is about the 10% of the Hungarian myrmecofauna: Camponotus vagus, Dolichoderus quadripunctatus, Formica gagates, F. pratensis, Lasius Fuliginosus, L. niger, L. platythorax, Myrmecina graminicola, Myrmica rubra, M. ruginodis and Temnothorax slavonicus.
Article
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Maculinea butterflies show social parasitism via obligatory myrmecophily as their larvae are adopted and raised to pupation by Myrmica ants. Suitable hosts differ for different Maculinea species, and host ant specificity can further differ at the population-level. Although early studies suggested single ant species as main hosts for each Maculinea...
Article
Full-text available
Host ant use of Maculinea teleius was investigated in 17 Hungarian and three Transylvanian (Romania) sites by opening Myrmica ant nests. A total of 856 nests of nine Myrmica species (M. contained 114 M. teleius specimens in to-tal. M. rubra and M. scabrinodis were the most frequently used host ants. M. rubra appeared to be more suitable in the west...
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Isolated populations of the myrmecophilous Dusky Large Blue butterfly (Maculinea nausithous) occur in Transylvania (Romania). The hitherto un-known host ant specificity of these populations was investigated at two sites, where Myrmica scabrinodis was the only potential host ant found. A total of 107 M. scabrinodis nests were opened in early summer...