Andras Boeszoermenyi

Andras Boeszoermenyi
Harvard Medical School | HMS · Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

PhD

About

36
Publications
15,911
Reads
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1,020
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - present
Harvard Medical School
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
September 2009 - March 2014
Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Field of study
  • Biochemistry and Molecularbiology
September 2004 - September 2009
Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Field of study
  • Chemistry

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
The target of Rapamycin complex1 (TORC1) senses and integrates several environmental signals, including amino acid (AA) availability, to regulate cell growth. Folliculin (FLCN) is a tumor suppressor (TS) protein in renal cell carcinoma, which paradoxically activates TORC1 in response to AA supplementation. Few tractable systems for modeling FLCN as...
Article
Full-text available
The fluorine-19 nucleus was recognized early to harbor exceptional properties for NMR spectroscopy. With 100% natural abundance, a high gyromagnetic ratio (83% sensitivity compared to 1H), a chemical shift that is extremely sensitive to its surroundings and near total absence in biological systems, it was destined to become a favored NMR probe, dec...
Article
Full-text available
Akt is a critical protein kinase that governs cancer cell growth and metabolism. Akt appears to be autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and kinase domain, which is relieved by C-tail phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here we use a combination of pro...
Article
Full-text available
Akt is a critical protein kinase that governs cancer cell growth and metabolism. Akt appears to be autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and kinase domain, which is relieved by C-tail phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use a combination of pr...
Article
Full-text available
Akt is a critical protein kinase that governs cancer cell growth and metabolism. Akt appears to be autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and kinase domain, which is relieved by C-tail phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we use a combination of pr...
Article
Full-text available
On average, an approved drug today costs $2-3 billion and takes over ten years to develop1. In part, this is due to expensive and time-consuming wet-lab experiments, poor initial hit compounds, and the high attrition rates in the (pre-)clinical phases. Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) has the potential to mitigate these problems. With SBVS,...
Article
Full-text available
Atomic-level information about the structure and dynamics of biomolecules is critical for an understanding of their function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides unique insights into the dynamic nature of biomolecules and their interactions, capturing transient conformers and their features. However, relaxation-induced line broad...
Article
Initial molecular details of cellular activation following αβT cell antigen receptor (TCR) ligation by peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) remain unexplored. We determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the TCRα subunit transmembrane (TM) domain revealing a bipartite helix whose segmentation fosters dynamic movement...
Article
Full-text available
The Bloch-Siegert shift is a phenomenon in NMR spectroscopy and atomic physics in which the observed resonance frequency is changed by the presence of an off-resonance applied field. In NMR, it occurs especially in the context of homonuclear decoupling. Here we develop a practical method for homonuclear decoupling that avoids inducing Bloch-Siegert...
Article
Full-text available
Leishmania parasites are unicellular pathogens that are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected sandflies. Most of the regulation of their gene expression occurs post-transcriptionally, and the different patterns of gene expression required throughout the parasites' life cycle are regulated at the level of translation. Here, we report th...
Article
Studies over the past decade have highlighted the functional significance of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Due to conformational heterogeneity and inherent dynamics, structural studies of IDPs have relied mostly on NMR spectroscopy, despite IDPs having characteristics that make them challenging to study using traditional 1H-detected bio...
Article
Full-text available
Backbone resonance assignment is a critical first step in the investigation of proteins by NMR. This is traditionally achieved with a standard set of experiments, most of which are not optimal for large proteins. Of these, HNCA is the most sensitive experiment that provides sequential correlations. However, this experiment suffers from chemical shi...
Article
Full-text available
The eukaryotic translational initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) interacts with the cap-binding protein eIF4E through a consensus binding motif, Y(X)4LΦ (where X is any amino acid and Φ is a hydrophobic residue). 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs), which also contain a Y(X)4LΦ motif, regulate the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction. The non- or minimally-phosphorylated for...
Article
Eukaryotic transcription activators stimulate the expression of specific sets of target genes through recruitment of co-activators such as the RNA polymerase II-interacting Mediator complex. Aberrant function of transcription activators has been implicated in several diseases. However, therapeutic targeting efforts have been hampered by a lack of d...
Article
Full-text available
Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for beta-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyc...
Article
Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (H...
Article
For typical globular proteins, contacts involving aromatic side chains would constitute the largest number of distance constraints that could be used to define the structure of proteins and protein complexes based on NOE contacts. However, the (1)H NMR signals of aromatic side chains are often heavily overlapped, which hampers extensive use of arom...
Article
Full-text available
The coordinated breakdown of intracellular triglyceride (TG) stores requires the exquisitely regulated interaction of lipolytic enzymes with regulatory, accessory and scaffolding proteins. Together they form a dynamic multi-protein network designated as the "lipolysome". Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) catalyzes the initiating step of TG hydroly...
Article
CGI-58/ABHD5 co-activates adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). In adipocytes, CGI-58 binds to perilipin 1A on lipid droplets under basal conditions, preventing interaction with ATGL. Upon activation of protein kinase A (PKA), perilipin 1A is phosphorylated and CGI-58 rapidly disperses into the cytoplasm, enabling lipase co-activation. Since the amin...
Article
Full-text available
The protein G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is a small basic protein that functions as an endogenous inhibitor of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a key enzyme in intracellular lipolysis. In this study, we identified a short sequence covering residues Lys-20 to Ala-52 in G0S2 that is still fully capable of inhibiting mouse and human ATGL. We found th...
Article
During mitosis, kinetochores coordinate the attachment of centromeric DNA to the dynamic plus ends of microtubules, which is hypothesized to pull sister chromatids toward opposing poles of the mitotic spindle. The outer kinetochore Ndc80 complex acts synergistically with the Ska (spindle and kinetochore-associated) complex to harness the energy of...
Article
To ensure equal chromosome segregation during mitosis, the macromolecular kinetochore must remain attached to depolymerizing microtubules, which drive chromosome movements. How kinetochores associate with depolymerizing microtubules, which undergo dramatic structural changes forming curved protofilaments, has yet to be defined in vertebrates. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
Monoacylglycerol lipases (MGLs) catalyse the hydrolysis of monoacylglycerol into free fatty acid and glycerol. MGLs have been identified throughout all genera of life and have adopted different substrate specificities depending on their physiological role. In humans, MGL plays an integral part in lipid metabolism affecting energy homeostasis, signa...
Data
Primers used for cloning mouse ATGL (full-length, C-terminal truncations and ATGL254-MBP) and G0S2. Underlined: restriction endonuclease cleavage sites. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme of lipolysis. ATGL specifically hydrolyzes triacylglycerols (TGs), thereby generating diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. ATGL's enzymatic activity is co-activated by the protein comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by the protein G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2). The e...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) is an important player in lipid metabolism. It acts as activator of triglyceride hydrolases and as acyl-CoA-dependent lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase. This review aims at establishing a structure-function relationship of this still rather enigmatic protein based on recent studies characterizing diff...
Article
Full-text available
The standard codon table is a primary tool for basic understanding of molecular biology. In the minds of many, the table's orderly arrangement of bases and amino acids is synonymous with the true genetic code, i.e., the biological coding principle itself. However, developments in the field reveal a much more complex and interesting picture. In this...

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