Anders Højen

Anders Højen
Aarhus University | AU · School of Communication and Culture

PhD

About

68
Publications
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691
Citations

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
Full-text available
Pediatricians recommend that parents read aloud to children, on the assumption that book reading during early childhood promotes language skills. However, it is not clear that children similarly profit from the practice, particularly those whose behavioral tendencies interfere with processes that leverage supportive environmental experiences into l...
Article
Full-text available
A favorable home literacy environment for preschool-aged children is related to higher language and preliteracy skills, which, in turn, predict later literacy skills and broader life outcomes. The quality of the home literacy environment is associated with socioeconomic indicators, but some previous research has indicated that also gender differenc...
Article
Full-text available
Parenting self-efficacy has been tied to myriad child outcomes during middle childhood and adolescence, directly and indirectly through parenting practices. The present study examines contemporaneous associations between parenting self-efficacy, parenting practices, and child outcomes during the preschool years in a community sample of 1455 Danish...
Book
This Element has two main purposes. Firstly, it discusses purposes, advantages, and disadvantages as well as the challenges of different formats of language assessment, concluding with a focus on educator-administered language assessment in early childhood and education programs. It addresses the selection of assessment domains, the trade-off betwe...
Chapter
Full-text available
The majority of children acquire language effortlessly but approximately 10% of all children find it difficult especially in the early or preschool years with consequences for many aspects of their subsequent development and experience: literacy, social skills, educational qualifications, mental health and employment. With contributions from an int...
Article
Full-text available
Measurement error is a ubiquitous element of social science studies. In large-scale effectiveness intervention studies on child language, administration of the assessment of language and preliteracy outcomes by speech and language pathologists is costly in money and human resources. Alternatively, daycare educators can administer the assessment, wh...
Article
Full-text available
Predictive relations between language and literacy skills during the preschool years and children's future reading achievement are well-documented, leading to development and evaluation of preschool interventions targeting early skill development. Although educational researchers have developed and found some positive short- and mid-term effects of...
Article
The first years of life are characterized by rapid learning in several school readiness domains, including language, math, and social-emotional skills, all of which are important for later childhood outcomes and academic achievement in school. In this research, we investigate the effects of an early-stage evidence-based school readiness interventio...
Article
Full-text available
Preschool children’s language and preliteracy skills are influenced by their home literacy environments. We asked to what extent this is true even for children in a context, Denmark, with near-universal childcare (97% at age 3–5), and additionally, if it holds specifically for dual-language learners. The sample consisted of 5791 4–6-year-olds from...
Article
It is often assumed that all languages are fundamentally the same. This assumption has been challenged by research in linguistic typology and language evolution, but questions of language learning and use have largely been left aside. Here we review recent work on Danish that provides new insights into these questions. Unlike closely related langua...
Article
Full-text available
“Early intervention” has been a mantra in recent debates about human capital investment. Strong theoretical models motivate this focus by predicting that investment in children is most cost‐effective when they are young. The “Heckman curve” summarizes this idea visually (Heckman, 2006). However, hardly any reviews scrutinize this hypothesis empiric...
Preprint
Full-text available
Are all languages processed in the same way, or might typological variation cause systematic differences between languages? We explore this question through a cross-linguistic comparison of categorical perception in two closely related languages, Danish and Norwegian. We employ drift diffusion models to reveal cross-linguistic differences in the ro...
Preprint
Full-text available
While the importance of childhood environments for shaping opportunities later in life is well established, most previous studies focus on parental inputs or public policies separately. This paper studies their interaction. We first show theoretically that the effects of public investments depend on the elasticity of substitution between inputs mad...
Article
Full-text available
Research has suggested that Danish-learning children lag behind in early language acquisition. The phenomenon has been attributed to the opaque phonetic structure of Danish, which features an unusually large number of non-consonantal sounds (i.e., vowels and semivowels/glides). The large number of vocalic sounds in speech is thought to provide fewe...
Preprint
Research has suggested that Danish-learning children lag behind in early language acquisition. The phenomenon has been attributed to the opaque phonetic structure of Danish, which features an unusually large number of non-consonantal sounds (i.e., vowels and semivowels/glides). The large amount of vocalic sounds in speech is thought to provide fewe...
Preprint
Research has suggested that Danish-learning children lag behind in early language acquisition. The phenomenon has been attributed to the opaque phonetic structure of Danish, which features an unusually large number of non-consonantal sounds (i.e., vowels and semivowels/glides). The large amount of vocalic sounds in speech is thought to provide fewe...
Article
Second-language acquisition has been shown to be influenced by age of learning (AOL), years of second-language experience and degree of second-language use. This study examined native and second-language speaking rates in a speeded sentence production task; speaking rate was expected to reflect the speed with which processes underlying speech produ...
Chapter
Full-text available
This study examined the effect of short-term immersion in English-language communities in England on young native Danish adults' English pronunciation. Pronunciation ratings by a group of native judges revealed signifi cantly higher pronunciation ratings when compared before and after 3-10 months of English immersion. A native Danish control group...
Preprint
Full-text available
Speech input is often noisy and ambiguous. Yet listenersusually do not have difficulties understanding it. A keyhypothesis is that in speech processing acoustic-phoneticbottom-up processing is complemented by top-downcontextual information. This context effect is larger when theambiguous word is only separated from a disambiguating word by a few sy...
Article
Immigrant children in Denmark differ greatly in educational outcomes. This study examined whether systematic differences in majority language (L2) and preliteracy skills are apparent already at ages 2–6 in immigrant children in Denmark across regional immigration background. Danish language and preliteracy skills in 1,211 immigrant children in four...
Article
Research has shown that contoids (phonetically defined consonants) may provide more robust and reliable cues to syllable and word boundaries than vocoids (phonetically defined vowels). Recent studies of Danish, a language characterized by frequent long sequences of vocoids in speech, have suggested that the reduced occurrence of contoids may make s...
Article
Full-text available
Structural quality in childcare centers is considered a precondition for process quality, which in turn is related to children’s outcomes. However, the evidence on relations between structural and process quality is mixed. Moreover, despite strong theoretical claims, empirical evidence supporting the indirect relation of structural features through...
Article
Identification of intervention program components most strongly associated with children's outcomes is essential for designing programs that can be taken to scale. In this effectiveness study, a population-representative sample of 5436 3-6-year-old Danish children from 154 daycare centers participated in a cluster-randomized evaluation of three var...
Article
As early childhood education programming expands across the globe, there is an increased need to understand how features of these programs influence children’s development. The composition of children’s age within a classroom is one such feature, although it is much less studied than other features. Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that...
Article
Full-text available
The present article reports results of a real-world effectiveness trial conducted in Denmark with six thousand four hundred eighty-three 3- to 6-year-olds designed to improve children's language and preliteracy skills. Children in 144 child cares were assigned to a control condition or one of three planned variations of a 20-week storybook-based in...
Article
Professional development (PD) is increasingly used to improve early childhood educators’ skills and knowledge in providing quality language and emergent literacy environments for children. However, the literature does not clearly indicate the extent to which such efforts reach their goals, or whether improvements in educator outcomes translate to l...
Article
Full-text available
We use a longitudinal design to examine associations for 2,120 16-30 months old children between early expressive vocabulary and later reading and math outcomes in the 6th Grade based on a large and diverse sample of Danish children. Educational outcomes, in particular decoding and reading comprehension, can be predicted from an early vocabulary me...
Article
The present study explored whether the phonological bias favoring consonants found in French-learning infants and children when learning new words (Havy & Nazzi, 2009; Nazzi, 2005) is language-general, as proposed by Nespor, Peña and Mehler (2003), or varies across languages, perhaps as a function of the phonological or lexical properties of the la...
Article
Full-text available
Authors' contributions Authors may use the following wordings for this section: This work was carried out in collaboration between all authors. Authors DB, AH, WV LD, PD, LJ and SP developed the study idea, designed the study and developed the protocol. Author WV designed the statistical analysis plan, Authors DB and WV drafted the manuscript. All...
Article
Previous research showed that French-learning 16- or 20-month-olds could learn pairs of words that differed by a single consonantal but not vocalic feature. Danish has a richer vowel inventory than French, allowing for 31 phonological vowel contrasts, including vowel length and presence∕absence of stod (laryngealization). The purpose of Experiment...
Article
Full-text available
En undersøgelse foretaget ved Syddansk Universitet af 12.992 sprogvurderinger har vist at flere faktorer har indflydelse på børns dansksproglige udvikling allerede i treårsalderen. Rapporten kan findes i Center for Børnesprogs E-prints som er tilgængelige via websiden www.sdu.dk/cfb. I nærværende artikel fokuseres på to faktorer, nemlig forældres u...
Article
Full-text available
At the onset of word learning around the age of 12 months, infants are highly capable of perceiving native phonological distinctions. However, required to make word-object associations, infants sometimes fail to perceive certain phonological distinctions. The present study used an inter-modal preferential looking technique to examine Danish 20-mont...
Article
Full-text available
It is uncertain from previous research to what extent the perceptual system retains plasticity after attunement to the native language (L1) sound system. This study evaluated second-language (L2) vowel discrimination by individuals who began learning the L2 as children ("early learners"). Experiment 1 identified procedures that lowered discriminati...
Conference Paper
Individuals who speak a second language (L2) are known to produce L2 utterances more slowly (i.e., with longer durations) than native (L1) speakers do. Native-nonnative differences are generally larger for individuals who began learning their L2 as adults ("late" bilinguals) than as children ("early" bilinguals). MacKay & Flege [Applied Psycholingu...
Article
The issue of whether new categories may be established for vowels found in a second language (L2) but not the native language (L1) remains controversial. The present study compared the discrimination of English vowels by native English speakers, early Spanish?English bilinguals, and Spanish monolinguals (n=20 each). Vowels in the control contrast (...
Article
Full-text available
Research has repeatedly shown that utterances produced by non‐native speakers are longer than those of native speakers, even when produced as rapidly as possible. The non‐native speaking rate effect is known to be greater for late than early L2 learners, but may disappear for late learners when very short‐duration L2 utterances are examined. This s...
Article
In this study the effect of immersion in a second‐language (L2) speaking environment on the perception and production of English sibilants by native (L1) speakers of Danish is examined. Three groups of subjects participated. Fourteen Danish au pairs or exchange students were tested before and after a 6–12 month immersion period. Eleven Danish contr...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
We examine language outcomes in children in childcare. For most children, the nesting structure is: child in classroom in chilcare center in municipality.
However, some childcare centers do not have traditional classroom division but a more open structure. That is, there is no classroom level, or it is identical to the childcare center level. Will the HLM work if, for some children, two levels are not distinguished?
I'm using STATA 16, "mixed" effects command.
Anders

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Local coworker http://interactingminds.au.dk/news/enkelt/artikel/the-puzzle-of-danish/