Anastasiia Zelenskaia

Anastasiia Zelenskaia
Saint Petersburg State University | SPBU · Department of Ichthyology and Hydrobiology

MS

About

4
Publications
1,101
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32
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
Saint Petersburg State University
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2015 - June 2017
Saint Petersburg State University
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
September 2011 - June 2015
Saint Petersburg State University
Field of study
  • Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Обзор посвящен обобщению и анализу данных по трехиглой колюшке Gasterosteus aculeatus Белого моря, которая в настоящее время является наиболее многочисленной рыбой водоема и играет важную роль в сообществах его прибрежной зоны и открытых вод. Численность колюшки была высокой в 1920– 1940 гг., сильно снизилась в период с конца 1960-х по конец 1990-х...
Article
Full-text available
This review summarizes and analyzes data on the threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus L. of the White Sea, which is currently the most abundant fish in the region and, therefore, plays an important role in inshore and offshore communities. The threespine stickleback was abundant in the 1920s-1940s; its numbers declined significantly between...
Article
Full-text available
Hypothesis: Marine threespine stickleback manifest homing ability and site fidelity during their spawning period. Organism: The threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus. Time and places: June 2015 and June 2016 (during the stickleback spawning period), Koliushkovaya Lagoon, Kandalaksha Bay, the White Sea. Methods: Stickleback were tagged on t...
Article
Full-text available
Hypothesis: In the White Sea, predatory fish species have consumed higher proportions of stickleback during historical periods and seasons of high stickleback abundance. Organisms: Adults, juveniles, and eggs of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), together with three species of predatory fishes: cod (Gadus morhua), saffron cod (Elegin...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Climate change and other anthropogenic impacts are causing major changes in marine ecosystems, especially rapid in the northern seas. Scientific research is needed to forecast these changes and their consequences. Our project in the White and Baltic Seas focuses on the mass fish species threespine stickleback, its population biology, and related predators, food organisms, and parasites.
Project
The goal of this project is to study the role of the threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the transport of substances and energy between the offshore and inshore communities of the White Sea. The abundance of threespine stickleback in the White Sea changed greatly over the last century, and in the last 15-20 years it has developed from a rather rare species into the most numerous fish species of the White Sea. In the summer in the 30-meter coastal zone, it comprises 95% of the total number of fish in the White Sea. Stickleback spend most of their life on the high seas, but spawning and development of juveniles occurs in the coastal zone, which is why this species is a powerful factor in the horizontal transport of matter and energy. Sexually mature fish that come from the open offshore, serving as food for predatory coastal fishes and seabirds - as well as eggs and juveniles. Juveniles leave offshore and grow there until the maturation. In the framework of this project we will assess: (1) the number of spawners; (2) spatial and temporal (during spawning season) distribution in the inshore zone; (3) value of sexual products of stickleback entering the inshore community; (4) the number of juveniles in the coastal biotopes and their number going offshore. For the research, in addition to the classical methods of ichthyology, video recording and nature experiments will be used. These data, together with data on mortality of stickleback during the spawning period (including that caused by predators), which will be assessed in other projects, will allow us to estimate the amount of substances and energy flow between the inshore and offshore communities controlled by the stickleback. These results, taking into account the data on the density of distribution of fish in the sea, will be extrapolated to the entire White Sea. The results of the project are directly relevant to understanding the relationship between the species and the community, and will also provide an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms of the functioning of marine high-latitude ecosystems and their long-term changes.
Project
Currently, high-latitude marine ecosystems undergo significant changes as a result of global climate change and anthropogenic pressure. In order to avoid negative effects of these changes, effective ecosystem management decisions, based on comprehensive scientific information on ecosystem functioning, are needed. It is very difficult to get thus information because of necessity to study a lot of species. In the current project proposal, we are going to study the trophic group of key planktivorous fish species of the ecosystem, that allow to study mechanisms of ecosystem changes. Upper and lower trophic levels of marine ecosystems are typically characterized by high species diversity, but intermediate level usually consists of several common and abundant species that control main energy and nutrient flows. This trophic level is usually called by scientists as “wasp waist”. Any changes in the abundance of these species well reflect a change in the whole ecosystem and they can be used as effective indicator species of ecosystem changes. In this project we will focus mostly on the three such species which are the most common in the White Sea and the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea – threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus and herrings Clupea pallasii and C. harengus. We will undertake the comprehensive ecological and population analysis of these species - their spatial distribution, long-term changes, population structure, trophic relationships, parasite-host relationships, intraspecific phylogeography. We are going to use a wide diversity of methods: study of size-age composition of samples, morphological and molecular genetic methods, population modeling, behavior, analysis of stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon and lipid composition to estimate trophic condition/status, photo and video registration etc. The results of the research will let us to understand the trends and factors involved in the longterm changes in populations of these species as well as the changes in whole temperate and subarctic marine ecosystems, that could be driven by the climate change and rising anthropogenic impact.