Anaïs Boura

Anaïs Boura
Sorbonne Université | UPMC · Centre de Recherche sur la Paléobiodiversité et les Paléoenvironnements (CR2P)

About

31
Publications
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659
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2009 - present
Sorbonne Université
Position
  • Maître de conférences

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
The paleoxylology of coniferous woods has progressed considerably since Kräusel's last (incomplete) synthesis in 1949. Nomenclatural practice has slowly purged itself of the diagnostic use of etymology. The use of certain new words or phrases has become essential, while other words have been subject to significant semantic drift or unjustified omis...
Article
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A major climatic shift, from a glasshouse world to a colder climate with well-developed ice sheets, occurred during the Cenozoic. Such a transition is recorded in both marine and terrestrial records. The latter is more fragmentary and thus comparatively less well known from a climatic point of view. Leaves are abundant fossil remains, which can be...
Article
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Studies of anatomically preserved fossils provide a wealth of information on the evolution of plant vascular systems through time, from the oldest evidence of vascular plants more than 400 million years ago to the rise of the modern angiosperm-dominated flora. In reviewing the key contributions of the fossil record, we discuss knowledge gaps and ma...
Article
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Thousands of silicified wood fragments were recently collected from the middle Cenomanian of Vienne in western France at less than 10 km away from a historical locality where in 1870 the French geologist Alphonse Le Touzé de Longuemar reported silicified wood. The plant assemblage is very diverse, and includes several species of ferns, conifers, an...
Article
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A new locality with silicified permineralised plant megafossils is reported from the upper Turonian of Colombiers, Vienne, western France. The plant fossil assemblage consists of Geinitzia reichenbachii (Geinitz) Hollick et Jeffrey and ‘Lomatopteris' superstes Saporta. Whilst G. reichenbachii is a worldwide widespread Cretaceous conifer, ‘L.' super...
Article
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Teredinidae are obligate xylophagous bivalves that colonize drift wood. They display a highly derived anatomy with a reduced shell; most of their body consists of soft tissues. Consequently, fossil teredinids mostly correspond to burrows, shells or small terminal aragonite structures called ‘pallets’. We report, from mid-Cretaceous logs of the Envi...
Article
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Determining the main factors causing urban tree decline is becoming essential for sustaining their health and survival. Understanding responses of tree growth to urban environments and climate change throughout tree life span is thus necessary. To explore these questions, a dendrochronological study exploring past climate-tree growth relationships...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Water availability is widely recognized as being an essential factor for tree survival, growth and for maximizing their ability in mitigating urban heat islands (UHI) through evapotranspiration. In urban areas, where the ground surface is highly impervious and the trees are not regularly irrigated, the reduction of precipitation infiltration into t...
Article
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The diversity of palm stem anatomy is now well known, but no study has dealt with the influence of climatic conditions. Here, we conducted research in order to establish whether this diversity follows a phylogenetic pattern and/or whether it is correlated with climatic factors. To answer this question, 98 genera and 137 species that cover the five...
Article
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The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan–Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55–34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated re...
Article
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Revision of the Mesozoic fossil wood record for Eastern Asia led to the recognition of a new type of homoxylous wood radial pitting, called here "the japonicum type". This anatomical feature has a limited distribution in both time and space. On this basis a new genus, Shimakuroxylon gen. nov. , is recognized. It has limited biostratigraphical inter...
Article
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The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age, that has yielded rodents and carnivorans, is the only exception to this rule. However, until now no pre-PETM localities have yielded modern mamm...
Article
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Article
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New fossil wood from the youngest Mesozoic continental red beds referred to as the "Grès supérieurs" (or "Upper Indosinias") of the Phú Quc and Th Châu Islands (Kiên Giang Province, southwestern Vietnam) is described. The fossil wood samples belong to Agathoxylon saravanensis (Serra) Philippe et al., and Protophyllocladoxylon xalucense sp. nov. Mor...
Article
Twelve species of fossil wood were identified from silicified specimens collected in the late middle Eocene Pondaung Formation, Myanmar. These species display affinities with modern Fabaceae, Moraceae, Combretaceae, Sapindaceae, Malvaceae, Dipterocarpaceae and Theaceae. They include five new species of the fossil genera Ficoxylon (F. mogaungense sp...
Article
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The knowledge of tree age is important for understanding tree growth and forest dynamics. It may be estimated by ‘direct’ methods involving growth ring counts, or by ‘indirect’ methods involving field measurements of growth rates. Direct methods are considered more accurate, but it is not clear if they are appropriate for all species, notably from...
Article
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The Dombeyoideae (Malvaceae) are one of the most diversified groups of plants in the Mascarene Islands. Species of Dombeya Cav., Ruizia Cav. and Trochetia DC. are distributed in almost all parts of the archipelago and show a wide diversity in their growth forms. This study provides the first wood anatomical descriptions of 17 out of the 22 Mascaren...
Article
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Trees, and thus wood, are major components of the biosphere. Wood constitutes a huge source of information regarding several domains like systematics, ecology or adaptative evolution. Despite its significance, wood is not often sampled extensively; most probably due to logistical reasons (harvesting or carrying problems). This work aims to review t...
Article
Full-text available
According to the IAWA committee (1989), the ring-porous wood is defined as a “wood in which the vessels in the earlywood are distinctly larger than those in the latewood of the previous and of the same growth ring.” This ring-porous structure is mainly present in regions with contrasted seasons. Some authors have mentioned the potential correlation...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Founded in Winter 2016, our group brings together international and Burmese scientists to study the geological record of Myanmar. The MyaPGR group organizes: -yearly fieldtrips to central Myanmar, focusing on geodynamic, tectonic, paleoclimatic, and paleoenvironmental studies of the Burmese sedimentary archives; -Lectures, workshops, and conference sessions focusing on Southeast Asian geological and climatic topics, in Myanmar and elsewhere; -exchange of faculty members and students for study, teaching, and research related to Earth Sciences; -outreach activities, in Myanmar and elsewhere, to sensitize the public on geological and climate change related hazards. On the web: https://myapgr.blog/ On facebook: Myanmar Paleoclimate and Geodynamics research group
Project
NECLIME is an open international network of scientists working on Cenozoic climate evolution and related changes of continental ecosystems. During the past 65 million years of Earth history, globally warmer-then-present conditions prevailed in a world with almost modern paleogeography. These timespans represent promising case studies for anticipated future scenarios. Within the NECLIME network, we aim to combine data on past climate change and its environmental impact for large-scale reconstructions. NECLIME research activities comprise paleoclimate reconstructions, including atmospheric CO₂ and ecosystem analysis using multiple quantitative methods on various primarily continental proxies (plants; vertebrates; invertebrates; geochemistry and geological proxies). Complementing model studies are employed to assess connections and processes driving ocean, atmosphere and biosphere at global and regional scales. NECLIME was established in 1999 with the aim to understand Neogene trends across Eurasia. This basic idea quickly and constantly expanded to a global interest and a wider stratigaphical frame. The steadily growing NECLIME network with currently around 140 members in 34 countries is coordinated by a team of researchers and an advisory board. NECLIME holds annual conferences and workshops and administers working groups bringing forward scientific exchange, joint projects, and the integration of research data. For more information go to www.neclime.de