Ana Da Silva

Ana Da Silva
Swansea University | SWAN

16.16
 · 
PhD

About

28
Publications
5,150
Reads
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132
Citations
Introduction
I am passionate about education and educational research. I have been working in medical education since 2005-2006, across several medical schools and three different countries. My PhD was focused on development of clinical reasoning and made use of very innovative linguistic analysis techniques in order to explore several aspects of its early development. I act as a reviewer for BMJ, PMJ, BMC MedEd, Medical Education, EPRSC and am a member of the BERA, SRHE, AMEE, ASME.
Research Experience
January 2012 - present
Swansea University
Position
  • Senior Lecturer
April 2008 - December 2011
University of Nottingham
Position
  • PhD Student/Researcher

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Clinical reasoning is at the core of health professionals' practice. A mapping of what constitutes clinical reasoning could support the teaching, development, and assessment of clinical reasoning across the health professions. Methods: We conducted a scoping study to map the literature on clinical reasoning across health professions...
Article
Background Research to date suggests older adults prefer a passive involvement in the clinical decision-making process; however, the empirical evidence underlying this claim in the mental health context is yet to be reviewed systematically. Aims To understand whether older adults desire involvement in mental health-related clinical decisions. Met...
Article
Full-text available
Bloom's Taxonomy is an approach to organizing learning that was first published in 1956. It is ubiquitous in UK Higher Education (HE), where Universities use it as the basis for teaching and assessment; Learning Outcomes are created using suggested verbs for each tier of the taxonomy, and these are then “constructively aligned” to assessments. We c...
Article
Background Understanding how non-clinical patient factors (NCpF) such as gender, educational level and socioeconomic status impact clinical decisions regarding one’s mental health is important for appropriate and equitable care. Main AimThis research aims to i) investigate the feasibility of using administrative health data to investigate clinical...
Article
Introduction: Clinical reasoning is considered to be at the core of health practice. Here, we report on the diversity and inferred meanings of the terms used to refer to clinical reasoning and consider implications for teaching and assessment. Methods: In the context of a Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) review of 625 papers drawn from 18 hea...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose An evidence-based approach to assessment is critical for ensuring the development of clinical reasoning (CR) competence. The wide array of CR assessment methods creates challenges for selecting assessments fit for the purpose; thus, a synthesis of the current evidence is needed to guide practice. A scoping review was performed to explore th...
Article
Full-text available
Higher education is now a global industry. As students and staff travel across the globe to study and teach, both the student population and the academic staff profile is becoming increasingly international. While there is a reasonable literature documenting the experiences and challenges of international students, little is, however, known about e...
Preprint
Full-text available
This report expores the results of a small study conducted between 2015 and 2016 as part of the Special Interest Group of the Wolfson Research Institute for Health & Wellbeing Durham University. The clinical reasoning delivery across the 33 Medical Schools was investigated and mapped to the GMC 2009 tomorrows doctors’ standards. This report present...
Article
Full-text available
Background Although a core element in patient care the trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education remains unclear. Empathy is generally regarded as comprising an affective capacity: the ability to be sensitive to and concerned for, another and a cognitive capacity: the ability to understand and appreciate the other person’s perspe...
Chapter
Full-text available
Women remain under-represented in leadership positions in both clinical medicine and medical education, despite a rapid increase in the proportion of women in the medical profession. This chapter explores potential reasons for this under-representation and how it can be ameliorated, drawing on a range of international literatures, theories and prac...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Recruitment and retention of doctors to rural and remote areas is a well-known problem to which very few countries are immune. Planning effective interventions to enable appropriate recruitment to rural areas requires an understanding of the specificities of each country and region, understanding 'what works' and 'why' in each specif...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Medical education is an international activity. As students and educators travel across the globe to study and teach, both medical student populations and academic staff profiles are becoming increasingly multinational. Little is, however, known about medical educators who chose to work and live abroad. Methods: Following a pilot study...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Medical students often require high levels of specialised institutional and personal support to facilitate success. Contributory factors may include personality type, course pressures and financial hardship. Drawing from research literature and the authors' experience, 12 tips are listed under five subheadings: policy and systems; people a...
Conference Paper
Social networking sites are highly popular among the medical community. Some of doctors’, trainees’ and medical students’ online activities have been criticised as compromising the reputation of the profession and the trust of the general public (Chretien, Greysen, Acad.Medicine 2009;302(12):1309–15). Research into the content of such online posts...
Article
full text available from: www.mededportal.org/publication/9616
Book
Full-text available
This paper reviews international approaches to commissioning and how to determine and control the number of places available on educational programs for doctors, nurses and midwives. These approaches are currently undergoing significant change in many international settings. This active state of flux provides learning opportunities for the Pacific...
Book
Full-text available
This review of accreditation for healthcare professionals training and education describes international trends and approaches to the accreditation of education programs or pathways that prepare graduates for entry to a professional register or to extend scopes of practice.
Book
Full-text available
The process of registration and licensing is designed to protect the public from harm perpetrated by incompetent health care workers, particularly those in the private sector over whom there is little or no administrative oversight. This review describes international trends and approaches to regulatory and licensing systems and the integration of...
Book
Full-text available
This review of complementary roles to those of traditional health workers, focussing on extended and expanded scopes of practice, has been prepared to inform a series of “Evidence and Policy Options” papers. It explores international trends and approaches to the development and implementation of new workforce roles alongside doctors, midwives and n...
Book
Full-text available
There is little evidence that the commissioning of health professionals education and training in the Pacific is guided by population health needs, workforce planning, an informed labour market analysis or forward budgetary projections. The two most significant challenges to commissioning education are the establishment of private sector medical ed...
Book
Full-text available
Accreditation of healthcare professional education programs to international standards would enable Pacific Island countries to ensure that the training of midwives, nurses and physicians meets quality standards and allows for mutual recognition of degrees.
Book
Full-text available
A common registration and licensing system for health professionals in Pacific Island countries (PICs) would ensure patient safety and comparable levels of competence through the application of measurable standards at key stages in an individual’s professional career.
Book
Full-text available
Advanced health practitioners with an extended scope of practice make important contributions to healthcare, either by meeting specific service delivery needs or helping to address an under-supply of doctors, especially in rural, remote and outer island settings. Pacific health workforce planners must now consider the potential impact on existing m...
Article
Problem-based learning (PBL) is one of the most researched areas of medical education; numerous studies and meta-analyses have examined its overall effectiveness compared with that of traditional methods. Fewer studies have looked at the processes occurring within the PBL group, considering that a key difference between PBL and traditional teaching...

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