Ana Morais Pinela

Ana Morais Pinela
University of Barcelona | UB · Department of Animal Biology

PhD in Biology

About

17
Publications
10,321
Reads
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146
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - June 2013
Universidade do Algarve
Position
  • Responsible for the Molecular Biology Laboratory
April 2011 - May 2011
University of Barcelona
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Course on “Stable isotopes techniques applied to population ecology.”
November 2010 - December 2010
University of Barcelona
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Course on “Stable isotopes techniques applied to population ecology.”
Education
January 2009 - July 2015
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Biodiversity and Animal Biology
October 2008 - April 2009
Durham University
Field of study
  • Molecular Ecology Group
September 2006 - October 2007
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Biodiversity: Evolution and Conservation

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
In pelagic species inhabiting large oceans, genetic differentiation tends to be mild and populations devoid of structure. However, large cetaceans have provided many examples of structuring. Here we investigate whether the sperm whale, a pelagic species with large population sizes and reputedly highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope abundances of carbon (delta C-13) and nitrogen (delta N-15) in the bone of 13 species of marine mammals from the northwest coast of Africa were investigated to assess their positions in the local trophic web and their preferred habitats. Also, samples of primary producers and potential prey species from the study area were collected...
Article
In the extensive geographical distribution of the common dolphin, several morphotypes of uncertain taxonomic status, identified by the relative length of their rostra, have been established. We investigated variation in skull morphometrics and isotopic signatures of carbon and nitrogen (d13C and d15N) in individuals from the subtropical waters of t...
Article
Full-text available
In the northeast Atlantic Ocean, the archipelago of the Azores is frequented by female–offspring groups of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L., 1758), as well as large males. The Azores apparently constitute both a feeding ground and a reproduction site. Little is known about the population and group structure of sperm whales in the area. We an...
Article
RATIONALE: Distinguishing population units of small cetaceans continuously distributed in a widespread area is challenging but critical for their conservation and management. The use of chemical markers allows the investigation of foraging ecology and inter-specific variability, in order to detect population structure and niche segregation in the c...
Conference Paper
The Cetacea is a group in which sexual dimorphism is rare and sexing of the individuals in the field is extremely difficult; and even in stranding events it is dependent on the degree of decomposition of the carcass. Therefore, sex determination using genetic tools is an extended practice amongst marine mammal biologists. DNA extracted from biologi...
Conference Paper
Distinguishing population units of small cetaceans continuously distributed in a widespread area is challenging, but very important for conservation purposes. Recently, stable isotope analyses (SIA) have been used to differentiate between dolphin populations. Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotope ratios in the bone tissue of stranded com...
Conference Paper
The common dolphin (genus Delphinus) has a wide range of distribution which led to the differentiation of a number of morphotypes which, until today, have an unclear taxonomic adscription. In many areas, two morphotypes were distinguished and later separated into two species: the long-beaked common dolphin, or Delphinus capensis, and the short-beak...
Conference Paper
O golfinho comum tem uma distribuição bastante cosmopolita estando presente em todos os oceanos do mundo, desde águas frias a temperadas e sub-tropicais. Esta enorme distribuição levou a que se diferenciassem inumeros morfotipos. Contudo, há muito pouca informação disponível no que diz respeito às águas tropicais e sub-tropicais do Noroeste African...
Conference Paper
The common dolphin has a widespread distribution and is present in all oceans of the world, where it occupies from cold to temperate and subtropical waters. This wide distribution has led to the differentiation of a number of morphotypes. Little information is available on this regard from the tropical and subtropical waters of the northeastearn At...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The common dolphin has a widespread distribution and is present in all oceans of the world, where it occupies from cold to temperate and subtropical waters. This wide distribution range has led to the differentiation of a number of morphotypes. Little information is available on this regard from the tropical and subtropical waters of the northeaste...
Conference Paper
Until the mid-1990s, research conducted on marine mammals in Mauritania was limited mostly to collection of stranding and sighting records. In 1992, the Marine Vertebrates Research Group of the University of Barcelona started research in the area, focusing on the ecology and population biology of the more common species. Initially, the marine mamma...
Conference Paper
Isotopic relative abundance of nitrogen and carbon in bone of twelve species of marine mammals from Mauritania were investigated to assess the position of each species in the trophic web and its preferred habitat. Sable isotopes were analysed in 165 individuals, together with samples from 10 Sardinella aurita and 23 marine seagrass and algae specie...
Poster
Full-text available
Sperm whales present a highly complex social structure. Photo-identification studies revealed their social organization extend from temporary aggregations to stable groups of individuals sharing more complex social bonds and possibly relatedness. Genetics were used as a tool to study relatedness and relationships between individuals or groups. Gene...
Poster
Full-text available
On a global scale, sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) populations show limited mitochondrial and no nuclear genetic differentiation between ocean basins. At the intra-oceanic scale, genetic variation seems to depend more on social organization than on geography. We investigated population structure and social organization of the sperm whale in th...
Poster
Full-text available
Sperm whale social structure is based on matrilineal groups of related females and immatures, which often form temporary associations with other female groups at lower latitudes, whereas mature males disperse to higher latitudes, visiting females in breeding areas. Although male and female sperm whales can be found in the Azores, there is no inform...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
In the study several genetic sex determination methodologies were investigated, compared, and discussed.
Thank you so much!

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
The main goals of the project are: 1) to examine the population structure, ecology and social organization of bottlenose dolphins and sperm whales inhabiting the waters around Faial and Pico islands; and 2) to describe and examine the influence of the environmental characteristics on the ecology of both species. Within these main goals the specific objectives are: 1) to examine the population structure of both species and to assess the relationship and extent of interactions between different population units; 2) to determine spatial and temporal distribution, relative abundance and habitat use for different population units in the study area; 3) to describe the social organization of different population units, based on group size and composition, association patterns and relatedness among individuals; 4) to assess the relation between environmental characteristics and distribution/abundance and habitat use patterns of the two species, and to analyse temporal changes in this relation; 5) to understand the key ecological factors acting on the social organization of bottlenose dolphins, by comparing group size and composition in areas with different ecological characteristics.