Ana Pellicer‐Sánchez

Ana Pellicer‐Sánchez
University College London | UCL · Institute of Education

Doctor of Philosophy University of Nottingham (UK)

About

45
Publications
16,966
Reads
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776
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on the teaching and learning of vocabulary in a second or foreign language. More specifically, I am interested in examining the effectiveness of different teaching and learning methodologies for improving both declarative and procedural vocabulary knowledge. My main research interests include the use of psycholinguistic measures of reaction times (RTs) and eye-tracking to explore learners' vocabulary acquisition, with a particular focus on the process of reading.
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
University College London
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2012 - December 2016
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2012 - September 2012
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Teaching Associate in Global Language Learning and Bilingualism
Education
September 2008 - March 2012
University of Nottingham
Field of study
  • Applied Linguistics
September 2006 - September 2007
University of Nottingham
Field of study
  • Applied Linguistics
September 2001 - June 2006
University of Murcia
Field of study
  • English language and literature

Publications

Publications (45)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We are organising a 1-day colloquium where London Second Language Acquisition Research Forum (L-SLARF) members will share ongoing research projects with students, researchers & the general public. The event will take place face-to-face & online. The event is free and open to all. Saturday May 21st 10:00-17:00 Room B35, Birkbeck, University London...
Article
This study examined the processing and acquisition of novel words and their collocates (i.e., words that frequently co-occur with other words) from reading and the effect of frequency of exposure on this process. First and second language speakers of English read a story with 1) eight exposures of adjective-pseudoword collocations, 2) four exposure...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effectiveness of bilingual subtitles relative to captions, subtitles, and no subtitles for incidental vocabulary learning. Learners’ processing of novel words in the subtitles and its relationship to learning gains were also explored. While their eye movements were recorded, 112 intermediate to advanced Chinese learners of E...
Article
Most of the texts that second language learners engage with include both text (written and/or spoken) and images. The use of images accompanying texts is believed to support reading comprehension and facilitate learning. Despite their widespread use, very little is known about how the presentation of multiple input sources affects the attentional d...
Article
Comprehension of many types of texts involves constructing meaning from text and pictures. However, research examining how second language (L2) learners process text and pictures and the relationship with comprehension is scarce. Thus, while verbal input is often presented in written and auditory modes simultaneously (i.e., audio of text with simul...
Article
Despite the importance of mastering different types of formulaic sequences in a second language, little is known about the relative effect of different input modes on their acquisition. This study explores the learning of a particular type of formulaic language (binomials) in three input modes (reading-only, listening-only, and reading-while-listen...
Article
Research has shown that several intralexical factors affect the learning burden of foreign language vocabulary (e.g., Laufer, 1997 ) and that some accrued lexical knowledge is forgotten. It is often assumed that the lexical items most difficult to acquire are those easiest to forget. However, few studies have provided empirical evidence to support...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effect of pre‐reading vocabulary instruction on learners’ attention and vocabulary learning. We randomly assigned participants (L1 = 92; L2 = 88) to one of four conditions: pre‐reading instruction, where participants’ received explicit instruction on six novel items and read a text with the items repeated eight times; readin...
Article
Full-text available
YOUNG LEARNERS’ PROCESSING OF MULTIMODAL INPUT AND ITS IMPACT ON READING COMPREHENSION: AN EYE-TRACKING STUDY – CORRIGENDUM - Volume 42 Special Issue - Ana Pellicer-Sánchez, Elsa Tragant, Kathy Conklin, Michael Rodgers, Raquel Serrano, Àngels Llanes
Article
Full-text available
The present study employed a mixed methods quasi-experimental design to investigate the effectiveness of applying motivational strategies and mental imagery (i.e. visionary techniques) to facilitate second language (L2) vocabulary learning. Four treatment sessions were integrated into a six-week language course offered to 150 intermediate students...
Article
Full-text available
Reading-while-listening has been shown to be advantageous in second language learning. However, research to date has not addressed how the addition of auditory input changes reading itself. Identifying how reading differs in reading-while-listening and reading-only might help explain the advantages associated with the former. The aim of the present...
Article
Full-text available
Theories of multimedia learning suggest that learners can form better referential connections when verbal and visual materials are presented simultaneously. Furthermore, the addition of auditory input in reading-while-listening conditions benefits performance on a variety of linguistic tasks. However, little research has been conducted on the proce...
Article
Full-text available
Students in academic contexts are expected to engage with large amounts of reading and they frequently meet unknown words and phrases in those reading materials. Previous research has shown that second and foreign language learners can acquire some of the unknown vocabulary that they encounter during reading. However, these previous findings were m...
Article
Full-text available
Combining reading with auditory input has been shown to be an effective way of supporting reading fluency and reading comprehension in a second language. Previous research has also shown that reading comprehension can be further supported by pictorial information. However, the studies conducted so far have mainly included adults or adolescents and...
Article
Full-text available
The use of materials combining verbal and nonverbal input in the EFL/ESL classroom is supported by theories of information processing and is a feature of most instructional practices designed for children. Previous research has shown that the combination of input modes leads to improved learning experiences. However, little is known about how learn...
Article
Full-text available
There has been extensive research in the last 20 years on the effectiveness of different instructional interventions and learning conditions on the acquisition of vocabulary. However, very few attempts have been made to explore how vocabulary knowledge develops over time. This paper argues for the need to conduct more longitudinal studies on vocabu...
Book
Understanding Formulaic Language: A Second Language Acquisition Perspective brings together leading scholars to provide a state-of-the-art, interdisciplinary account of the acquisition, processing, and use of formulaic language. Contributors present three distinct but complementary perspectives on the study of formulaic language – cognitive/psychol...
Chapter
In the last few decades, the study of formulaic language has become a major focus in second language acquisition research. The volume introduced here provides a state-of-the-art review of what is currently known about the processing, acquisition, and use of formulaic sequences, with a particular focus on a second language. The chapter sets the scen...
Article
The field of vocabulary research is witnessing a growing interest in the use of eye-tracking to investigate topics that have traditionally been examined using offline measures, providing new insights into the processing and learning of vocabulary. During an eye-tracking experiment, participants’ eye movements are recorded while they attend to writt...
Book
Eye-tracking is quickly becoming a valuable tool in applied linguistics research as it provides a 'real-time', direct measure of cognitive processing effort. This book provides a straightforward introduction to the technology and how it might be used in language research. With a strong focus on the practicalities of designing eye-tracking studies t...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the relative effectiveness of different teaching approaches on the learning of formulaic sequences. Three comparisons were made in this study: the effects of explicit teaching of formulaic sequences versus teaching embedded in traditional coursebook instruction, the effects of the degree of salience of the sequences in the c...
Article
Full-text available
With eye-tracking technology the eye is thought to give researchers a window into the mind. Importantly, eye-tracking has significant advantages over traditional online processing measures: chiefly that it allows for more ‘natural’ processing as it does not require a secondary task, and that it provides a very rich moment-to-moment data source. In...
Article
Full-text available
There is general agreement that speed of lexical access is an essential component for successful communication and fluent language use. In vocabulary acquisition research the majority of studies have focused on the acquisition of the form and meaning of new words but research into the teaching conditions leading to the improvement of speed of lexic...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that intentional learning through explicit instruction is effective for the acquisition of collocations in a second language (L2) (e.g. Peters, 2014, 2015), but relatively little is known about the effectiveness of incidental approaches for the acquisition of L2 collocations. The present study examined the incidental acq...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that reading is an important source of incidental second language (L2) vocabulary acquisition. However, we still do not have a clear picture of what happens when readers encounter unknown words. Combining offl ine (vocabulary tests) and online (eye-tracking) measures, the incidental acquisition of vocabulary knowledge fr...
Chapter
Full-text available
Vocabulary and reading are characterized by a reciprocal and mutually supportive relationship. A common way of looking at this relationship has been to focus on the dual direction of its effect (Hu & Nation, 2000).Keywords:second language acquisition;reading;vocabulary
Article
Full-text available
Despite a number of research studies investigating the Yes No vocabulary test format, one main question remains unanswered: What is the best scoring procedure to adjust for testee overestimation of vocabulary knowledge? Different scoring methodologies have been proposed based on the inclusion and selection of nonwords in the test. However, there is...
Article
Full-text available
Nation (2006) has calculated that second language (L2) learners require much more vocabulary than previously thought to be functional with language (e.g., 8,000–9,000 word families to read independently). This level is far beyond the highest graded reader, and would be difficult to explicitly teach. One way for learners to be exposed to mid-frequen...