Amy Wotherspoon

Amy Wotherspoon
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Forest Resources Management

PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow | UBC | Silva21

About

11
Publications
3,491
Reads
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88
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
84 Citations
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Introduction
Working to produce consistent, fine resolution and spatially-explicit climate layers of historic trends and future projections for key variables at 12 research forests across Canada. I assess likely changes in climate at each site, providing insights into how the drivers of tree growth are likely to evolve over time.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - May 2021
Université de Sherbrooke
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • The interactions between silvicultural treatment, geological deposit and climate in controlling black spruce growth in Québec (Canada)
September 2011 - February 2014
University of Guelph
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Quantification of carbon gains and losses for five tree species in a 25-year-old tree-based intercropping system in southern Ontario, Canada
September 2006 - December 2011
University of Guelph
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Major in Environmental Biology, minor in Forest Systems. Graduated with Honours.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Rising temperatures are likely to increase the risk of drought across the globe over the next century. Boreal forests are particularly vulnerable to drought because temperatures within these biomes are projected to warm the fastest. Warm and dry conditions can reduce tree growth, particularly in regions that are already moisture-limited, which may...
Article
Full-text available
Scarification is a mechanical site preparation technique designed to create microsites that will favor the growth of planted tree seedlings after clearcutting. However, the positive growth response of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) Britton, Sterns & Poggenb.) to scarification varies across different sites. We hypothesized that this was due to...
Article
Full-text available
In the province of Québec (Canada), pre-commercial thinning (PCT) is a common silvicultural practice applied to young black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) stands. PCT removes some of the competing vegetation and smaller black spruce stems, in order to improve growth rates and reduce forest rotation intervals. It is uncertain whether this positi...
Article
Boreal ericaceous shrubs, such as Kalmia angustifolia, have evolved various traits allowing them to interfere with the growth of conifer trees. These include the ability to spread through rhizomatous growth and to produce high amounts of tannins that interfere with soil N cycling. We examined how pre-commercial thinning (PCT) of young black spruce...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The objective of this report is to produce consistent, spatially explicit climate layers at a fine spatial resolution for the 12 Silva21 key managed forested areas across Canada. Generated layers intend to provide historical trends and future projections for Canadian climate. This report can be used to explore how regional changes in climate are li...
Article
Boreal forests are experiencing climate change more rapidly than other biomes, which is likely to impact their future management. Understanding how tree growth responds to regional and seasonal variation in climate is essential to anticipate future management of boreal forests. We compiled and summarized black spruce climate-growth relationships fr...
Article
Rising temperatures are likely to increase the risk of drought across the globe over the next century. Boreal forests are particularly vulnerable to drought because temperatures within these biomes are projected to warm the fastest. Warm and dry conditions can reduce tree growth, particularly in regions that are already moisture-limited, which may...
Article
Full-text available
Quantification of soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important element in the assessment of the carbon sequestration potential of soils in tree-based intercropping (TBI) systems. The organic carbon (OC) concentrations of soils in TBI systems often differ from those in conventional agricultural systems due to the additional C inputs from litter fall an...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon (C) sequestration potential was quantified for five tree species, commonly used in tree-based intercropping (TBI) and for conventional agricultural systems in southern Ontario, Canada. In the 25-year-old TBI system, hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra clone DN-177), Norway spruce (Picae abies), red oak (Quercus rubra), black wal...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Objective 1: interactions between scarification and ecophysiology of 16-year-old black spruce trees across two climate regions of Québec. Objective 2: interactions between pre-commercial thinning and geological deposit (till vs clay soil types) within the region of Abitibi, Québec. Objective 3: interactions between pre-commercial thinning and climate across two climate regions of Québec, particularly in years of climate anomalies.