Amy Mcqueen

Amy Mcqueen
Washington University in St. Louis | WUSTL , Wash U · Division of Health Behavior

PhD

About

95
Publications
22,095
Reads
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3,531
Citations
Citations since 2016
41 Research Items
2019 Citations
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Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Washington University in St. Louis
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Survey Methods: Design and Evaluation
February 2008 - present
Washington University in St. Louis
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
October 2006 - January 2008
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 1996 - August 2002
University of Houston
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
October 1992 - December 1996
University of California, San Diego
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (95)
Article
Introduction Smoking rates differ by insurance type; rates are often double for Medicaid and uninsured compared with that for Medicare or privately insured. State-funded tobacco quitlines’ provision of free nicotine replacement therapy varies. In some states, Medicaid beneficiaries must obtain nicotine replacement therapy from a physician, whereas...
Article
Objective: Most emergency preparedness planning seeks to identify vulnerable population subgroups; however, focusing on chronic conditions alone may ignore other important characteristics such as location and poverty. Social needs were examined as correlates of anticipated needs and desire for assistance during an emergency. Methods: A retrospec...
Article
Full-text available
Home smoking bans reduce exposure to second-hand smoke. Understanding how psychosocial factors are related to having a home smoking ban may lead to better interventions for populations less likely to have home smoking bans, including low-income smokers. In this study, we used baseline data from 1,944 participants in a randomized trial of low-income...
Article
Objective The study sought to determine whether reporting a history of depression, anxiety, PTSD, bipolar disorder, drug or alcohol use disorder, ADHD, schizophrenia, or current depressive symptoms was associated with requesting help for any of 12 social needs. Methods A community-based sample of 1,944 low-income adult smokers in Missouri who had...
Article
Treatment trials increasingly include quality of life (QoL) measures to compliment clinical outcomes. Most QoL studies focus on clinical correlates. The growing appreciation for social determinants of health warrant examining how they impact QoL. This analysis of a preliminary baseline sample of 296 Medicaid beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes from...
Article
Evidence supports diabetes distress’ (distress hereafter) effect on diabetes self-management. Few studies have examined factors that influence distress. We used self-reported cross-sectional data from Medicaid beneficiaries in Louisiana to examine psychosocial and clinical factors and their associations with distress. The sample (n=345) was mostly...
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Smokers are at greater risk of multiple health conditions that are exacerbated by environmental hazards associated with low housing quality. However, little is known about the prevalence of low housing quality among low-income smokers. Using correlations and logistic regression, we examined associations among eight housing quality indicators – pest...
Article
COVID-19 vaccines have been granted emergency use authorization for children ages 5 years and older. To understand how racially and ethnically diverse parents of young children enrolled in Medicaid feel about a prospective COVID-19 vaccine for their children, we administered an online survey that included both close-ended and open-ended items to a...
Article
Introduction Unconventional smoking behaviors such as smoking used or discarded cigarettes may increase the risk of nicotine dependence and exposure to toxins. To better understand low-income smokers who smoke discarded cigarettes and to inform effective tobacco cessation strategies, the current study examined potential correlates not considered in...
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Background Low-income Americans smoke cigarettes at higher rates and quit less than other groups. Methods To increase their engagement in and success using evidence-based cessation methods, we tested two interventions using a 2x2 randomized factorial design: (1) telephone navigation to reduce financial strain and address social needs such as food,...
Article
Introduction A 2019 Cochrane review concluded telephone counseling is an effective intervention for smoking cessation. However, the review did not assess the role of socioeconomic status (SES) indicators on the effectiveness of telephone counseling. Methods We reviewed 65 U.S. studies from the Cochrane review. We abstracted data on education, inco...
Article
Objectives: To characterize the availability, content, and psychometric properties of self-reported measures that assess race/ethnicity-related discrimination or psychosocial stress and have potential relevance to studies of health disparities in children and adolescents. Design: Using PRISMA extension guidelines for scoping reviews, we searched Ov...
Preprint
In the current effort to vaccinate as many people as possible against COVID-19, it has been suggested that events such as the pause in the use of the Janssen vaccine would have a large effect on perceptions of vaccine safety. Further, as vaccination rates slow, there is concern that hesitancy may be stable and difficult to change among those still...
Article
Health care organizations are increasingly assessing patients' social needs (eg, food, utilities, transportation) using various measures and methods. Prior studies have assessed social needs at the point of care and many studies have focused on correlates of 1 specific need (eg, food). This comprehensive study examined multiple social needs and med...
Article
Introduction: Among individuals with low income, cost is a well-established barrier to medication adherence. Spending less on basic needs to pay for medication is a particularly concerning cost-coping strategy and may be associated with worse health outcomes. The aims of this study were (1) to describe the demographic and health status characteris...
Article
There has been an explosion of interest in addressing social needs in health care settings. Some efforts, such as screening patients for social needs and connecting them to needed social services, are already in widespread practice. These and other major investments from the health care sector hint at the potential for new multisector collaboration...
Article
The purpose of this study was to better understand the number and types of social needs experienced by Medicaid beneficiaries with type 2 diabetes, and how their social needs are associated with key health indicators. Also examined were factors that influence patients’ interest in navigation services for health and social needs to inform future int...
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Full-text available
Little is known about the acceptability and use of remote biochemical verification of self-reported cessation among low-income and racially diverse smokers. We compared responses to an in-person carbon monoxide breath test and in-home urine cotinine test among 270 adults who reported 7-day continuous abstinence at 6-month follow-up in a community-b...
Article
Background: Internet-based risk assessment tools offer a potential avenue for people to learn about their cancer risk and adopt risk-reducing behaviors. However, little is known about whether internet-based risk assessment tools adhere to scientific evidence for what constitutes good risk communication strategies. Furthermore, their quality may va...
Article
Many healthcare organisations are now routinely screening patients for social needs such as food and housing. It is largely unknown whether the needs they identify would have been expressed by the patient in the absence of screening. To better understand expressed and unexpressed social needs, we administered a social needs screener to 1,397 low‐in...
Article
Background In the United States more than half of cervical cancers occur in women who are inadequately screened. Interventions to improve access to cervical cancer preventive care is critical to reduce health inequities. Objective We aimed to evaluate need for cervical cancer screening among women seeking assistance with basic needs and to assess...
Article
p>Cancer risk prediction models such as those published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention are a cornerstone of precision medicine and public health efforts to improve population health outcomes by tailoring preventive strategies and therapeutic treatments to the people who are most likely to benefit. However, there are several barr...
Article
Social needs screening in health care settings reveals that many low-income individuals have multiple unmet social needs at the same time. Having multiple simultaneous social needs greatly increases the odds of experiencing adverse health outcomes. To better understand how and which social needs cluster in these cases, the authors examined data fro...
Article
Objective: In this paper, we examine client perspectives of health coaching programs and differences by insurance type. Methods: We used descriptive coding and directed content analysis to analyze semi-structured qualitative in-person interviews that assessed preferred health coach qualifications and experience, desirable attributes for coaches, an...
Article
Background: Internet-based risk assessment tools offer a potential avenue for people to learn about their cancer risk and adopt risk-reducing behaviors. However, little is known about whether internet-based risk assessment tools adhere to scientific evidence for what constitutes good risk communication strategies. Furthermore, their quality may var...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Internet-based risk assessment tools offer a potential avenue for people to learn about their cancer risk and adopt risk-reducing behaviors. However, little is known about whether internet-based risk assessment tools adhere to scientific evidence for what constitutes good risk communication strategies. Furthermore, their quality may vary...
Article
Diabetes self-management (i.e., glucose control, medication adherence, healthy behaviors) is important but challenging, especially among low-income populations. Competing priorities such as social needs (i.e., food, housing, safety, financial) and managing comorbidities adds further burden and may affect healthcare utilization. A large Medicaid man...
Article
Health care providers are increasingly screening low-income patients for social needs and making referrals to social services agencies to assist in resolving them. A major assumption of this approach is that local social services providers have the capacity and resources to help. To explore this assumption, we examined 711,613 requests related to f...
Article
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Self-affirmation interventions can reduce defensive responses to threats to the self, but have had limited reach to the general population. We sought to create an effective and feasible version of the Kindness Questionnaire self-affirmation intervention for use on a mobile device outside the traditional university laboratory setting and by non-stud...
Article
Interventions are needed to increase colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) uptake. Narratives may have advantages over didactic information. We tested different narratives for increasing CRCS intentions and behaviors, and examined their mechanisms of influence. We randomized 477 unscreened adults 50–75 years old to one of three groups: CRCS informatio...
Article
Smoking in the United States follows a clear socioeconomic gradient: low-income Americans smoke more and quit less than those with more education and income. Evidence-based interventions like tobacco quitlines are designed to make effective cessation services available on a population basis to all smokers. However, these interventions do not addres...
Article
Unmet social needs—including food, housing, and utilities—have been associated with negative health outcomes, but most prior research has examined the health associations with a single unmet need or analyzed samples that were homogeneous along one or more dimensions (e.g., older adults or patients with chronic health conditions). We examined the as...
Article
Use of health coaching to help individuals make and sustain changes in health behavior and disease management is increasing, and early evidence about its effects is promising. However, few studies assess participants’ preferences and expectations about health coaches, the use of the term health coach, and the coaching relationship. To help inform t...
Article
Purpose: Rural women are less likely to have regular Pap smears and often have less access to care than their urban peers, which may lead to more advanced stage at diagnosis of cervical cancer. We sought to evaluate the relationship of rural-urban status and access to care on cervical cancer stage at diagnosis. Methods: We extracted 2007 to 2013 Su...
Article
In the face of unmet basic needs, low SES adults are less likely to obtain needed preventive health services. The study objective was to understand how these hardships may cluster and how the effectiveness of different health-focused interventions might vary across vulnerable population sub-groups with different basic needs profiles. From June 2010...
Article
Few studies have examined how diverse populations interpret warning labels. This study examined interpretations of 9 graphic cigarette warning labels (image plus text) proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration among a convenience sample of youth (ages 13-17) and adults (18+) across the United States. Participants (N = 1,571) completed a cro...
Article
Full-text available
Background Telephone quitlines can help employees quit smoking. Quitlines typically use directive coaching, but nondirective, flexible coaching is an alternative. Call-2-Quit used a worksite-sponsored quitline to compare directive and nondirective coaching modes, and evaluated employee race and income as potential moderators. Methods An unblinded...
Article
The 2-1-1 information and referral helpline connects economically vulnerable Americans with needed health and social services in their communities. This longitudinal study followed a random sample of 2-1-1 callers in Missouri (n = 1,235) to determine the results of the referrals they received. One month after calling 2-1-1, most remembered receivin...
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Full-text available
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While mortality rates are in decline in most westernised countries, global estimates predict that CRC incidence rates and the overall number of CRC-related deaths are set to rise by 77% and 80%, respectively, by 2030. The development of CRC is multifactorial, a...
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Tobacco quitlines are critical components of comprehensive tobacco control programs. However, use of the US National Tobacco Quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW) is low. Promoting quitlines on cigarette warning labels may increase call volume and smoking cessation rates but only if smokers are aware of, and receptive to, quitline services. We conducted qualit...
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Full-text available
Dominant health care professional discourses on cancer take for granted high levels of individual responsibility in cancer prevention, especially in expectations about preventive screening. At the same time, adhering to screening guidelines can be difficult for lower income and under-insured individuals. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a prime example....
Article
Effective screening can reduce colorectal cancer mortality; however, screening uptake is suboptimal. Patients' stories about various health topics are widely available online and in behavioral interventions and are valued by patients. Although these narratives may be promising strategies for promoting cancer screening behavior, scant research has c...
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Full-text available
There are conflicting reports about the efficacy of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) as nicotine delivery devices and smoking cessation products. In addition, smokers' responses to some nicotine dependence questions often change as they transition to exclusive e-cig use. Nicotyrine may explain these observations. Nicotyrine forms by the gradual oxida...
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We examined the utility of January 2004 to April 2014 Google Trends data from information searches for cancer screenings and preparations as a complement to population screening data, which are traditionally estimated through costly population-level surveys. State-level data across the USA. Persons who searched for terms related to cancer screening...
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The expansion of mobile health technologies, particularly for diabetes-related applications (apps), grew exponentially in the past decade. This study sought to examine the extent to which current mobile apps for diabetes have health literate features recommended by participants in an Institute of Medicine Roundtable and compare the health literate...
Chapter
The goal of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is to reduce morbidity and mortality from CRC, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Regular screening with the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy can reduce incidence and mortality from CRC. Organizations such as the American Cancer Society recommend that perso...
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Full-text available
Graphic warning labels have been shown to be more effective than text-only labels in increasing attention and perceived health risks, but most U.S. studies have involved single exposures in laboratory or Internet settings. We recruited a convenience sample (N=202) of U.S. adult smokers from population subgroups with higher rates of smoking and smok...
Article
Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test us...
Article
Objective: African American (AA) cancer survivors report poorer self-rated health (SRH) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Spirituality is often linked to positive health outcomes, with AAs reporting greater levels of spirituality. This study examined the potential mediating role of cancer-related problems in the relationship between spiritua...
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Social media are now used by a majority of American internet users. Social media platforms encourage participants to share information with their online social connections and exchange user-generated content. Significant numbers of people are already using social media to share health-related information. As such, social media provide an opportunit...
Article
A 2009 petition opposing a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ban of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) garnered international attention from e-cig users (vapers). Petitioners' comments described the perceived benefits of vaping. We conducted a qualitative and quantitative analysis of petitioners' comments. A sample of 200 petitioner names was sought i...
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To examine beliefs, prior use, and interest in using pharmacotherapy among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Cross-sectional survey of smokers in a midwestern HIV clinic. The sample (N = 146) included 69% men, 82% African Americans, 45% were in precontemplation for quitting, and 46% were interested in using pharmacotherapy. Primary reasons for n...
Article
Background: Few studies have examined the psychometric properties and invariance of scales measuring constructs relevant to colorectal cancer screening (CRCS). We sought to: (i) evaluate the factorial validity of four core constructs associated with CRCS (benefits, barriers, self-efficacy, and optimism); and (ii) examine measurement invariance by...
Article
To reduce negative psychological affect from information or behavior that is inconsistent with one's positive self-concept, individuals use a variety of defensive strategies. It is unknown whether correlates differ across defenses. We examined correlates of four levels of defensive information processing about colorectal cancer screening. Cross-sec...
Article
Female breast cancer survivors, a large and growing population, experience impaired physical functioning after treatment. Survivors living in impoverished neighborhoods may suffer even greater impairment, but the mechanisms linking neighborhood poverty and individual outcomes are poorly understood. This study sought to identify mediators of the eff...
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There is a great deal of variation in the existing capacity of primary prevention programs and policies addressing chronic disease to deliver evidence-based interventions (EBIs). In order to develop and evaluate implementation strategies that are tailored to the appropriate level of capacity, there is a need for an easy-to-administer tool to stage...
Article
The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test preference and examine the association between test preference and test completed. Patients (n = 1224) were 50-70 years, at average CRC risk, and overdue for screening. Outcome variables were preference for fecal occult blood test (FOBT), colono...
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We examined the association between perceived discrimination and smoking status and whether psychological distress mediated this relationship in a large, multiethnic sample. We used 2004 through 2008 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Reactions to Race module to conduct multivariate logistic regression analyses and tests of me...
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Objective: Individuals have a large repertoire of defensive strategies for dealing with personally relevant negative feedback including health risk information. Defensive processes are covered in a diverse literature and in theoretical models such as the extended parallel process model, but outside the psychopathological domain, little attention h...
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Background. Despite the availability of multiple effective tests for colorectal cancer (CRC), screening rates are low. Greater understanding of barriers between screeners and nonscreeners may improve public health initiatives to increase CRC screening (CRCS). Methods. We conducted a content analysis of 625 responses to the question: "Was there anyt...
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Self-reported cancer screening behaviors are often overreported and may lead to biased estimates of prevalence and of subgroup differences in screening. We examined whether the tendency to give socially desirable responses was associated with concordance between self-reported colorectal cancer (CRC) screening behaviors and medical records. Primary...
Article
To examine the independent associations between multiple health status indicators and breast and colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) in a national US sample. Analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) involved 5115 men and 7100 women aged 50 years and older. Health status indicators included: self-reported...
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Examine the longitudinal effects of personal narratives about mammography and breast cancer compared with a traditional informational approach. African American women (n = 489) ages 40 and older were recruited from low-income neighborhoods in St. Louis, Missouri, and randomized to watch a narrative video comprised of stories from African American b...
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We examined the extent of changes in absolute and relative geographic disparities in six colorectal cancer (CRC) indicators using data about persons aged 50 and older from 195 counties in the 1988-2006 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database. County-level trends in six colorectal cancer indicators (overall CRC incidence, descen...
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There have been few studies of tailored interventions to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. We conducted a randomized trial of a tailored, interactive intervention to increase CRC screening. Patients 50-70 years completed a baseline survey, were randomized to one of three groups, and attended a wellness exam after being exposed to a tailore...
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Awareness and use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) has increased dramatically. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Devices deliver an aerosol comprised usually of water, propylene glycol and/or glycerin, nicotine, and flavorings. Scant research exists to evaluate the efficacy and safety of such devices, and only one quantitative survey of European users...
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Screening for colorectal cancer is considered cost effective, but is underutilized in the U.S. Information on the efficiency of "tailored interventions" to promote colorectal cancer screening in primary care settings is limited. The paper reports the results of a cost effectiveness analysis that compared a survey-only control group to a Centers for...
Article
Compare the immediate affective and cognitive reactions to cancer survivor stories about mammography and breast cancer vs. a didactic, informational approach. Participants (N=489) were African American women age 40 years and older (mean=61). Most had ≤high school education (67%), annual household income ≤$20,000 (77%), and a prior mammogram (89%)....
Article
Compare effects of narrative and informational videos on use of mammography, cancer-related beliefs, recall of core content and a range of reactions to the videos. African American women (n=489) ages 40 and older were recruited from low-income neighborhoods in St. Louis, MO and randomly assigned to watch a narrative video comprised of stories from...
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Full-text available
Although support exists for multiple psychosocial predictors of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, little is known about the relationships among these variables. Understanding the associations between such predictors could refine health behavior theories and inform the design of interventions. In addition to direct effects, we examined whether base...
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Full-text available
Various interventions to promote repeat use of mammography have been evaluated, but the efficacy of such interventions is not well understood. We searched electronic databases through August 15, 2009, and extracted data to calculate unadjusted effect estimates (odds ratios [ORs] and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). Eligible studies were those that...
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We examined whether self-affirmation would facilitate intentions to engage in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among individuals who were off-schedule for CRC screening and who were categorised as unrealistically optimistic, realistic or unrealistically pessimistic about their CRC risk. All participants received tailored risk feedback; in addition...
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The development and use of validated processes of change (POC) measures have received little attention in the literature despite their importance in the Transtheoretical Model. Using survey data (N = 2909), we examined the construct validity of a 22-item mammography POC scale by testing for factorial validity and factorial invariance across stage o...
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Despite a growing body of research from the United States and other industrialized countries on the inverse association between supportive social relationships in the school and youth risk behavior engagement, research on the measurement of supportive school social relationships in Central America is limited. We examined the psychometric properties...
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Full-text available
Despite the availability of multiple effective screening tests for colorectal cancer, screening rates remain suboptimal. The literature documents patient preferences for different test types and recommends a shared decision-making approach for physician-patient colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) discussions, but it is unknown whether such communica...