Amy E. Mayer

Amy E. Mayer
University of Rhode Island | URI · Department of Natural Resources Science

M.Sc. Environmental Science

About

6
Publications
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19
Citations

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Human developments have detrimental effects on wildlife populations globally with carnivores being particularly sensitive. The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is often considered an adaptable mesocarnivore that occurs throughout varied landcover types within its wide distribution and may be less susceptible to the negative effects of development. Our objective...
Article
Lynx rufus (Bobcat) is a wide-ranging and highly adaptable predator whose populations are increasing throughout much of its natural range including in the New England states, yet there are only limited empirical ecological studies there. How Bobcats are responding to the unique modern landscape of southern New England with its highly forested lands...
Article
Full-text available
The New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis) is the focus of extensive efforts to conserve the species. A major component of their conservation program is the collection of faecal samples to determine their distribution and abundance throughout their range. In parts of their range, New England cottontail is sympatric with a non-native eas...
Article
Full-text available
Changing landscapes in the Northeastern United States over the past century have had a profound effect on the abundance and distribution of native wildlife species that prefer early successional habitat, including New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis). Populations of New England cottontail have been in decline for several decades, wher...
Article
Full-text available
The New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis) is a high conservation priority in the Northeastern United States and has been listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. Loss of early successional habitat is the most common explanation for the decline of the species, which is considered to require habitat with dense low...

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