Amy Kuenzi

Amy Kuenzi
Montana Tech of the University of Montana | Montana Tech · Biological Sciences

Ph.D, University of Arizona

About

61
Publications
8,806
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1,329
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
457 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
January 2009 - present
Montana State University
January 2007 - December 2009
Colorado State University

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
Ecological and environmental factors can influence the transmission of infectious diseases. They can accomplish this via effects on host susceptibility and exposure to infection, which are governed by host physiology and behavior, respectively. To better inform disease control, more information is needed about how extrinsic factors affect physiolog...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to examine costs associated with workers’ compensation claims from firefighters in Montana. Workers’ compensation claims data were obtained from the Montana Department of Labor and Industry. The highest proportion of total benefit amount dollars was paid to male firefighters (93.7%), public employees (84.8%), and tho...
Article
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Significance There has been an impassioned debate in recent years about whether biodiversity is negatively or positively correlated to wildlife and zoonotic disease transmission and risk, suggesting a “dilution” or “amplification” effect, respectively. Here, we demonstrate for an important zoonotic disease (hantavirus pulmonary syndrome) that speci...
Article
Full-text available
Comparatively little is known about hantavirus prevalence within rodent populations from the Midwestern US, where two species of native mice, the prairie deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii) and the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis), are dominant members of rodent communities. We sampled both species in central Indiana...
Article
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Parasites and pathogens are increasingly recognized as signi cant drivers of ecological and evolutionary change in natural ecosystems. Concurrently, transmission of infectious agents among hu- man, livestock, and wildlife populations represents a growing threat to veterinary and human health. In light of these trends and the scarcity of long-term t...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites and pathogens are increasingly recognized as significant drivers of ecological and evolutionary change in natural ecosystems. Concurrently, transmission of infectious agents among human, livestock, and wildlife populations represents a growing threat to veterinary and human health. In light of these trends and the scarcity of long-term ti...
Article
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Understanding the environmental drivers of zoonotic reservoir and human interactions is crucial to understanding disease risk, but these drivers are poorly predicted. We propose a mechanistic understanding of human–reservoir interactions, using hantavirus pulmonary syndrome as a case study. Crucial processes underpinning the disease's incidence rem...
Article
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Hantaviruses are widespread emergent zoonotic agents that cause unapparent or limited disease in their rodent hosts, yet cause acute, often fatal pulmonary or renal infections in humans. Previous laboratory experiments with rodent reservoir hosts indicate that hantaviruses can be cleared from host blood early in the infection cycle, while sequester...
Article
Full-text available
The most common mechanism for human exposure to hantaviruses throughout North America is inhalation of virally contaminated particulates. However, risk factors associated with exposure to particulates potentially contaminated with hantaviruses are generally not well understood. In North America, Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is the most common hantavirus...
Article
Full-text available
Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV), hosted by the North American deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North America. Most transmission studies in the host were conducted under artificial conditions, or extrapolated information from mark-recapture data. Previous studies using experimentally infected deermice wer...
Data
Information on primers and reference sequences used to sequence small (S) and medium (M) segments of SNV-MH strains 1, 2, and 3. Includes amplification regions of each primer set and reference strains used to design primers. ACCN#: Genbank Accession number. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Surveys of wildlife host-pathogen systems often document clear seasonal variation in transmission; conclusions concerning the relationship between host population density and transmission vary. In the field, effects of seasonality and population density on natural disease cycles are challenging to measure independently, but laboratory experiments m...
Data
Interior corner of one enclosure showing Sherman trap. (JPG)
Data
Sheet metal enclosure array used for containing deermice in Montana. (JPG)
Data
Supplementary methods for Population Density and Seasonality Effects on Sin Nombre Virus Transmission in North American Deermice ( Peromyscus maniculatus ) in outdoor enclosures. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the main reservoir host for Sin Nombre virus, the primary etiologic agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in North America. Sequential changes in weather and plant productivity (trophic cascades) have been noted as likely catalysts of deer mouse population irruptions, and monitoring and modeling of these phen...
Article
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We examined the influence of rock cover, as an indicator of presumable retreat site availability on the abundance of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and prevalence of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) using long-term live trapping and habitat data from three live trapping grids and a short-term (three month), spatially replicated study across three slopes...
Article
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We examined the effects of grazing on deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) movements into buildings using passive integrated transponder (PIT) technology and small simulated buildings located on 0.6-ha treatment (grazing) and control (no grazing) plots. Twelve experimental 9-day trials were conducted over the course of the study. During these trials...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of intermittently occurring, non-reservoir host species on pathogen transmission and prevalence in a reservoir population is poorly understood. We investigated whether voles, Microtus spp., which occur intermittently, influenced estimated standing antibody prevalence (ESAP) to Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus) among d...
Article
Full-text available
aBStract Published information on bat species presence in many parts of Montana is limited. Our study was initiated to gather data on the distribution of bat species found in the southwestern part of the state. We captured 106 individuals of eight bat species in mist-nets at 15 water sources in southwestern Montana during July through August 2003-2...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how transmission of zoonoses takes place within reservoir populations, such as Sin Nombre virus (SNV) among deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), is important in determining the risk of exposure to other hosts, including humans. In this study, we examined the relationship between deer mouse populations and the prevalence of antibodies t...
Article
Full-text available
In a world of emerging and resurging infectious diseases, dominated by zoonoses, environmental monitoring plays a vital role in our understanding their dynamics and their spillover to humans. Here, we critically review the ecology, epidemiology and need for monitoring of a variety of directly transmitted (Sin Nombre virus, Avian Influenza) and vect...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Comprehension of environmental factors which drive interactions between humans and reservoirs of zoonotic diseases are critical to understand disease risk and predict incidence. An appreciation of these relationships is particularly important in light of anticipated changes in climatic. Sin Nombre virus (SNV) is a dire...
Article
Full-text available
Reports of novel emerging and resurging wildlife and zoonotic diseases have increased. Consequently, integration of pathogen sampling into wildlife monitoring programs has grown. Sampling frequency influences interpretations of coupled host-pathogen dynamics, with direct implication to human exposure risk, but has received little empirical attentio...
Article
Full-text available
We developed a compartmental model for hantavirus infection in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) with the goal of comparing relative importance of direct and indirect transmission in sylvan and peridomestic environments. A direct transmission occurs when the infection is mediated by the contact of an infected and an uninfected mouse, while an indi...
Article
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We examined seasonal dispersal patterns and timing of new infections of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), as determined by recent acquisition of antibodies (seroconversion), in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) at two Montana rangeland study sites over three years, 2004-2007. One study site was located in grassland habitat, and the other was located in shru...
Article
Full-text available
Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the principal reservoir host of Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Deer mice use a wide variety of habitats including peridomestic settings in and around human dwellings, their presence in and around homes has been implicated as a risk factor for acquiring Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome. Deer mice are believed to enter bu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods The effect of non-reservoir host species, which occur intermittently over time, on pathogen prevalence among a reservoir species is poorly understood. We investigated whether voles, Microtus spp., which occur intermittently, influenced infection prevalence of Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV, Bunyaviridae: Hantavirus) in deer...
Article
Full-text available
Virus–host interactions vary widely, depending on the hostspecies and the virus, and depend on age, dose and route ofexposure in determining whether the outcome will be achronic host infection with viral nucleic acid (genome) intarget organs such as brain, lung, liver or kidney, whetherinfectious virus will be excreted over time, and what theroute...
Article
Full-text available
Through dispersal, deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) enter peridomestic settings (e.g., outbuildings, barns, cabins) and expose humans and other deer mouse populations to Sin Nombre virus (SNV). In June 2004, research on deer mouse dispersal was initiated at 2 locations in Montana. During the course of the study, over 6000 deer mouse movements wer...
Article
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We monitored Limestone Canyon hantavirus (LSCV) antibody prevalence, host (brush mouse, Peromyscus boylii) abundance, and environmental variables (temperature and rainfall) in brush mice captured on three trapping webs in southern Arizona for 5 yr. Although seasonal patterns were subtle, we observed large multiyear variation in population abundance...
Article
Full-text available
We used long-term data collected for up to 10 yr (1994-2004) at 23 trapping arrays (i.e., webs and grids) in Arizona, Colorado, Montana, and New Mexico to examine demographic factors known or suspected to be associated with risk of infection with Sin Nombre virus (SNV) in its natural host, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Gender, age (mass)...
Article
Full-text available
Prevalence of antibody to Sin Nombre virus (SNV) has been found to be nearly twice as high in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) in peridomestic settings as in sylvan settings in two studies in Montana and one in New Mexico. We investigated whether this difference may be related to a difference in deer mouse movements in the two settings. We used r...
Article
Full-text available
Infections with hantaviruses in the natural host rodent may result in persistent, asymptomatic infections involving shedding of virus into the environment. Laboratory studies have partially characterized the acute and persistent infection by Sin Nombre virus (SNV) in its natural host, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). However, these studies...
Article
We applied a rigorous, quantitative methodology to the analysis of local- scale spatial clustering of multiple murid mice (brush mice, Peromyscus boylii; deer mice, P. maniculatus; pinon mice,P. truei; western harvest mice, Reithrodontomys megalotis ) infected or uninfected with hantaviruses. Rodents were sampled longitudinally from 1994 to 2001 on...
Article
Full-text available
We examined whether passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags were a more effective marking technique for a long-term population study of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus marking technique for a long-term population study of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus marking technique for a long-term population study of deer mice () than ear tags. We compa...
Article
Little is known about stopover habitat use by neotropical migratory birds in the deserts of North America. We determined distribution, abundance, and habitat associations of neotropical migrants during spring migration in the Sonoran Desert of southwestern Arizona along large washes that supported xeroriparian scrub vegetation. We detected 91 bird...
Article
Full-text available
Trapping and removing deer mice from ranch buildings resulted in an increased number of mice, including Sin Nombre virus antibody-positive mice, entering ranch buildings. Mouse removal without mouse proofing will not reduce and may even increase human exposure to Sin Nombre hantavirus.
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of temporal variation in bat activity within an area is an essential component in designing bat surveys. Yet few studies have thoroughly examined this aspect of bat biology. We measured bat activity at 3 temporal scales in the southern Arizona Sonoran Desert to develop recommendations for designing bat inventory programs and to provide ba...
Article
Full-text available
We evaluated habitat use, abundance trends, and potential relationships between biotic and abiotic conditions and characteristics of rodent assemblages in southeastern Arizona. In May 1995 we established 3 sampling webs in the semidesert grassland at the Santa Rita Experimental Range, Pima County, Arizona. Mark-release trapping was conducted for 3...
Article
Full-text available
Most human cases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome are acquired in the peridomestic environment, yet studies of the ecology and infection dynamics in the reservoir host, the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), have focused on sylvan populations. We describe a 2.5-year study of hantavirus infection in rodents associated with peridomestic habitats in...
Article
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Handling mortality and recapture rates of wild rodents that were bled from the retroorbital capillary plexus without anesthesia were assessed. In 9,670 captures of seven species of rodents from 1994 through 1998, we found no difference in handling mortality in bled mice compared to those from trapping grids where mice were not bled. Recapture rates...
Article
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From 1996 through 1999, 35 deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were captured in 25 urban and suburban homes in southwestern Montana. Mice were captured throughout the year except for January; seven mice (20%) from seven (28%) of the homes were seropositive for Sin Nombre virus. The infected mice were mostly adult males captured in the spring and fal...
Article
Full-text available
We captured 299 individuals of 11 bat species in mist-nets at 18 water sources in west-central Nevada from June through August 1994. Myotis ciliolabrum, Pipistrellus hesperus, M. californicus, and Corynorhinus townsendii were the most common species captured. These species are apparently broadly distributed throughout west-central Nevada, occurring...
Article
Full-text available
We determined the prevalence of Sin Nombre virus antibodies in small mammals in southeastern Arizona. Of 1,234 rodents (from 13 species) captured each month from May through December 1995, only mice in the genus Peromyscus were seropositive. Antibody prevalence was 14.3% in 21 white-footed mice (P. leucopus), 13.3% in 98 brush mice (P. boylii), 0.8...
Article
Full-text available
The Truckee River in California and Nevada is subject to diverse water regimes and a corresponding variety of flow rates. Original riparian vegetation has been altered by these variable flow rates and by a variety of human uses resulting in loss of native riparian vegetation from its historic extent. We conducted bird surveys along the Truckee Rive...
Article
Diets of Canis latrans, Urocyon cinereoargenteus, and Buteo jamaicensis at Concord Naval Weapons Station, California, were determined from scats and pellets collected from March 1992 to March 1993. All 3 predators were opportunistic feeders whose diets consisted of a variety of food items. Microtus californicus was the most frequent animal prey fou...
Article
We conducted short-term bat surveys as part of an inventory program at 23 sites in 12 mountain ranges of west-central Nevada during the summer of 1994. With this information, we compared the number of bat species identified through direct capture in mistnets with the number detected ultrasonically by their echolocation calls. The average number of...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted short-term bat surveys as part of an inventory program at 23 sites in 12 mountain ranges of west-central Nevada during the summer of 1994. With this information, we compared the number of bat species identified through direct capture in mist-nets with the number detected ultrasonically by their echolocation calls. The average number of...
Article
We studied the diets of desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki Mearns) at 3 sites in Arizona and collated this information with that of previous diet studies of desert mule deer across their range in the United States, We documented 96 browse, 69 forb, 14 succulent, and 6 grass species that each constituted greater than or equal to 1% of the...
Article
Full-text available
We assessed mortality due to handling and survival of small mammals that had been anesthetized and then bled through the orbital sinus during a 1-year study in southeastern Arizona. Rates of return and mortality due to handling were not significantly different between treatment and control for any species. Estimates of survival based on Cormackloll...
Article
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To evaluate the efficacy of translocation as a nonlethal management alternative, we determined trapability, post-release survival, site fidelity, and homing ability of experimentally translocated California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi). Trapability of squirrels was low (0.04 captures/trap-day). Most squirrels (71-79%) survived until ≥18...
Article
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A case study of the Fresno kangaroo rat may provide a model for management of other small, isolated, and at-risk populations.
Article
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This paper presents a methodological approach that was recently developed to determine alternatives for control of California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) and the resulting ecological consequences at the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS). The U.S. Navy initiated this study upon determining a need to control ground squirrels for safet...
Article
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This paper quantifies the distribution and abundance of birds in the White Mountains, Inyo and Mono counties, California, during spring-summer 1989-91, to establish a baseline for monitoring the area's avifauna. Overall, 58 species were encountered in the single-leaf pinyon-Utah juniper (Pinus monophylla-Juniperus osteosperma) zone, and 61 species...
Article
Full-text available
The ecophysiology of Neotropical landbird migrants was studied in relation to energetic condition following trans-Gulf migration in 1987, 1988, and 1989. Most birds captured on East Ship Island, a barrier island off the Mississippi coast, had exhausted fat reserves crossing the Gulf of Mexico and were near fat-free mass. Few birds were recaptured a...

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