Amy S Kennedy

Amy S Kennedy
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Cooperative Institute for Climate Ocean and Ecosystem Studies (CICOES)

PhD

About

41
Publications
15,222
Reads
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613
Citations
Introduction
My overarching research interests focus on biologging research and development, with emphasis on describing fine-scale marine mammal behavior within protected areas and regions of high human impact. In addition to behavior and movement studies, I collaborate on projects that examine the long-term physiological impacts of bio-logger deployment on large whales and the overall performance of various bio-logger designs. For more information about me, please visit amyskennedy.com
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - July 2019
University of Washington Seattle
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Professor, FSH475, Marine Mammalogy
November 2010 - November 2013
Université Paris-Sud 11
Position
  • PhD Student
February 2008 - November 2015
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Position
  • Research Biologist

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are showing strong recovery from commercial whaling in the western South Atlantic. In this region, humpback whales migrate annually from their winter breeding grounds off the coast of Brazil to their summer feeding grounds near to the Polar Front, an area that includes the waters of South Georgia and the Sou...
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are a cosmopolitan species and perform long annual migrations between low-latitude breeding areas and high-latitude feeding areas. Their breeding populations appear to be spatially and genetically segregated due to long-term, maternally inherited fidelity to natal breeding areas. In the Southern Hemisphere,...
Article
Full-text available
Southern right whale vocalizations were recorded concurrently with visual observations off the sub-Antarctic Island of South Georgia, and the characteristics of these calls were described. Calls were also compared to those of humpback whales at South Georgia, to determine how the two species might reliably be distinguished acoustically. The souther...
Article
Around 176500 whales were killed in the sub-Antarctic waters off South Georgia (South Atlantic) between 1904 and 1965. In recent decades, whales have once again become summer visitors, with the southern right whale (SRW) the most commonly reported species until 2011. Here, we assess the distribution, temporal pattern, health status and likely prey...
Article
The ever-increasing human demand for fossil fuels has resulted in the expansion of oil exploration efforts to waters over the continental shelf. These waters are largely utilized by a complex biological community. Large baleen whales, in particular, utilize continental shelf waters as breeding and calving grounds, foraging grounds, and also as migr...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Over 170,000 whales were killed in the sub-Antarctic waters of South Georgia (Islas Georgias del Sur, SG, South Atlantic) from 1904 to 1965. In recent decades, whales are regular summer visitors, with the southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliea) most commonly reported. A 23-day cetacean survey was condu...
Article
Full-text available
As species recover from exploitation, continued assessments of connectivity and population structure are warranted to provide information for conservation and management. This is particularly true in species with high dispersal capacity, such as migratory whales, where patterns of connectivity could change rapidly. Here we build on a previous long-...
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales wintering in the entire West Indies chain are widely treated as comprising a single breeding population. However, most areas outside of Silver Bank and Samana Bay, Dominican Republic, are poorly and sporadically studied. Data is presented on the timing and movement patterns of 262 whales from the southeastern Caribbean, extending fr...
Article
Full-text available
Manned aerial surveys are routinely used to assess cetacean distribution and density, often over large geographic areas. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have been identified as a technology that could augment or replace manned aerial surveys for cetaceans. To understand what research questions involving cetacean distribution and density can be addr...
Article
Full-text available
Manned aerial surveys have been used successfully for decades to collect data to infer cetacean distribution, density (number of whales/km2), and abundance. Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have potential to augment or replace some manned aerial surveys for cetaceans. We conducted a three-way comparison among visual observations made by marine mamma...
Article
Full-text available
North Atlantic humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, migrate from summer feeding grounds across the temperate and high latitudes to breeding grounds in the West Indies each winter. Humpbacks over-wintering near the Antillean islands comprise one of the most intensely studied populations of large whales in the world. Since scientific research beg...
Article
We collated available satellite telemetry data for six species of ice-associated marine mammals in the Pacific Arctic: ringed seals (Pusa hispida; n=118), bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus, n=51), spotted seals (Phoca largha, n=72), Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens, n=389); bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus, n=46), and five Arctic an...
Article
Full-text available
Southern Hemisphere humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) generally undertake annual migrations from polar summer feeding grounds to winter calving and nursery grounds in subtropical and tropical coastal waters. Evidence for such migrations arises from seasonality of historic whaling catches by latitude, Discovery and natural mark returns, and r...
Data
Dedicated and incidental sightings of “super-groups” of humpback whales reported in this study. (DOCX)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
An essential component of risk assessment is identification whether individuals will be exposed to a risk. This requires information on the proportion of the population exposed, for how long, and during what activity (i.e., feeding, migrating, and breeding). Using satellite telemetry data for humpback and blue whales feeding and migratory regions i...
Article
Full-text available
We analyzed data from line-transect aerial surveys for marine mammals conducted in the eastern Chukchi Sea (67˚–72˚ N, 157˚–169˚ W) in July to October of 2009–15 to investigate bowhead and gray whale distributions, behaviors, sighting rates, and habitat selection preferences, the last of which allowed direct comparison with results from data collec...
Article
Full-text available
In species that aggregate for reproduction, the social and fitness costs of movement between groups frequently lead to restricted exchange between breeding areas. We report on four individual humpback whales identified in both the Cape Verde Islands and Guadeloupe; locations separated by an ocean basin and >4000 km. This rate of exchange is rarely...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Humpback whales wintering throughout the West Indies chain are widely treated as comprising a single breeding population. However, most areas outside of the Dominican Republic are poorly and sporadically studied. We present data on the timing and movement patterns of 269 whales from the southeast Caribbean, extending from Antigua in the north to Tr...
Article
Full-text available
The humpback whale population of New Caledonia appears to display a novel migratory pattern characterized by multiple directions, long migratory paths and frequent pauses over seamounts and other shallow geographical features. Using satellite-monitored radio tags, we tracked 34 whales for between 5 and 110 days, travelling between 270 and 8540 km o...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding habitat use of critically endangered North Pacific right whales (NPRWs, Eubalaena japonica) is important to better evaluate the potential effects of anthropogenic activities and climate change on this species. Satellite transmitters were deployed on individual right whales in 2004, 2008 and 2009 to investigate whether their space-use...
Article
Full-text available
Abundance of harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) was estimated from data collected during vessel surveys conducted throughout the inland waters of Southeast Alaska. Line-transect methods were used during 18 seasonal surveys spanning 22 years (1991–2012). Estimates were derived from summer surveys only because of the broader spatial coverage and gre...
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales utilize waters off the Aleutian Islands and Bering Sea as foraging grounds during summer months. Currently, the fine-scale movements of humpback whales within these feeding grounds are poorly understood. In the summers of 2007 to 2011, 8 humpback whales were tracked with satellite tags deployed near Unalaska Bay. Individuals were tr...
Article
Full-text available
This dissertation has been prepared in manuscript format and contains four individual papers. Each paper/chapter is formatted for the journal to which it has been, or will be, submitted. In the first manuscript, "From Whaling to Tagging: The evolution of knowledge regarding humpback whales in their North Atlantic breeding grounds", I describe the e...
Article
Full-text available
North Atlantic humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski, 1781)) migrate from high-latitude summer feeding grounds to low-latitude winter breeding grounds along the Antillean Island chain. In the winters and springs of 2008 through 2012, satellite tags were deployed on humpback whales on Silver Bank (Dominican Republic) and in Guadeloupe (F...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Satellite telemetry has greatly improved understanding of large whale ecology and conservation. However, long-term attachments are typically invasive and systematic studies of their impacts have been limited. Additionally, satellite tag duration has been highly variable and shorter than battery capacity. The exact causes of tag failure are poorly u...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic analysis of 49 biopsy samples from North Pacific right whales Eubalaena japonica in the eastern (48) and western (1) North Pacific revealed 24 individual whales with 7 mitochondrial haplotypes. Three pairs of large and small individuals were identified in the field; genotype analysis indicated that 2 of these could represent mother-offsprin...
Article
Full-text available
The North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica) was heavily exploited by both nineteenth century whaling and recent (1960s) illegal Soviet catches. Today, the species remains extremely rare especially in the eastern North Pacific. Here, we use photographic and genotype data to calculate the first mark-recapture estimates of abundance for right w...
Article
Full-text available
The North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica was heavily exploited throughout the Gulf of Alaska by both historical whaling and 1960s illegal Soviet catches. It is now extremely rare in this region (2 sightings between 1966 and 2003 and passive acoustic detections on 6 days out of 80 months of recordings at 7 locations). From 2004 to 2006, 4 si...
Article
Through an Inter-Agency agreement (IA) between the National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) and the Minerals Management Service (MMS), NMML is conducting a dedicated multi-year study of the distribution, abundance and habitat use of North Pacific right whales in the North Aleutian Basin and southeastern Bering Sea. This report covers activities con...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
The South Georgia marine ecosystem is globally recognised as a biodiversity hotspot, and its waters are one target of a growing krill fishery. Today, right whales are the most commonly seen whale in South Georgia waters, slowly returning after four centuries of exploitation. A growing body of evidence hypothesises that South Georgia environmental conditions directly influence the low latitude, wintering ground population dynamics of these whales, suggesting foraging success is a primary factor influencing reproductive rates. Our project will conduct surveys to South Georgia that are designed to investigate right whale prey sources, habitat use in relation to the krill fishing within the sustainable-use South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands Marine Protected Area (MPA), genetic diversity, population connectivity with wintering grounds and health status.