Amy E. Kendig

Amy E. Kendig
University of Florida | UF · Department of Agronomy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

26
Publications
2,108
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181
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Early detection and eradication of invasive plants are more cost-effective than managing well-established invasive plant populations and their impacts. However, there is high uncertainty around which taxa are likely to become invasive in a given area. Horizon scanning that combines a data-driven approach with rapid risk assessment and consensus bui...
Article
This publication describes why invasive species are an important issue in Florida and how nonnative species become invasive by moving through five stages of human-aided biological invasion. Written by Deah Lieurance, Amy Kendig, and Christina Romagosa, and published by the UF/IFAS Agronomy Department, July 2022.
Preprint
Invasive species impact ecosystems through their large abundances and strong per capita effects. Enemies can regulate abundances and per capita effects, but are notably absent for many new invaders. However, invaders acquire enemies over time and as they spread; processes hypothesized to mitigate negative invader impacts by reducing abundance or pe...
Article
Full-text available
Host nutrient supply can mediate host–pathogen and pathogen–pathogen interactions. In terrestrial systems, plant nutrient supply is mediated by soil microbes, suggesting a potential role of soil microbes in plant diseases beyond soil-borne pathogens and induced plant defenses. Long-term nitrogen (N) enrichment can shift pathogenic and nonpathogenic...
Article
Abstract Plant litter can alter ecosystems and promote plant invasions by altering resource availability, depositing phytotoxins, and transmitting microorganisms to living plants. Transmission of microorganisms from invasive plant litter to live plants may gain importance as invasive plants, which often escape pathogens upon introduction to a new r...
Preprint
Early detection and eradication of invasive plants are more cost-effective than managing well-established invasive plant populations and their impacts. However, there is high uncertainty around which taxa are likely to become invasive in a given area. Horizon scanning, which pairs rapid risk assessment with consensus building among experts, can hel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Nutrient supply rates to hosts can mediate host–pathogen interactions. In terrestrial systems, nutrient supply to plants is mediated by soil microbes, suggesting a potential indirect effect of soil microbes on plant–pathogen interactions. Soil microbes also may affect plant pathogens by inducing plant defenses. We tested the role of soil microbes,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant litter can alter ecosystems and promote plant invasions by changing resource acquisition, depositing toxins, and transmitting microorganisms to living plants. Transmission of microorganisms from invasive litter to live plants may gain importance as invasive plants accumulate pathogens over time since introduction. It is unclear, however, if i...
Article
Diversity and nitrogen addition have positive relationships with plant productivity, yet climate‐induced changes in water availability threaten to upend these established relationships. Using long‐term data from three experiments in a mesic grassland (ranging from 17‐34 years of data), we tested how the effects of species richness and nitrogen addi...
Article
Infectious diseases and invasive species can be strong drivers of biological systems that may interact to shift plant community composition. For example, disease can modify resource competition between invasive and native species. Invasive species tend to interact with a diversity of native species, and it is unclear how native species differ in re...
Chapter
This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to...
Article
The densities of highly competent plant hosts (i.e. those that are susceptible to and successfully transmit a pathogen) may shape pathogen community composition and disease severity, altering disease risk and impacts. Life history and evolutionary history can influence host competence; longer lived species tend to be better defended than shorter li...
Article
Non-native invasive plants can establish in natural areas, where they can be ecologically damaging and costly to manage. Like cultivated plants, invasive plants can experience a relatively disease-free period upon introduction and accumulate pathogens over time. Diseases of invasive plant populations are infrequently studied compared to diseases of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Infectious diseases and invasive species are strong drivers of biological systems that may interact to shift plant community composition. Disease and invasion can each directly suppress native populations, but variation in responses among native species to disease, invasion, and their combined effects are not well characterized. Here, we quantified...
Article
Interactions among co‐infecting pathogens are common across host taxa and can affect infectious disease dynamics. Host nutrition can mediate these among‐pathogen interactions, altering the establishment and growth of pathogens within hosts. It is unclear, however, how nutrition‐mediated among‐pathogen interactions affect transmission and the spread...
Preprint
Full-text available
The densities of highly competent plant hosts may shape pathogen community composition and disease severity, altering disease risk and impacts. Life history and evolutionary history influence host competence: longer-lived species tend to be better defended than shorter-lived species and pathogens adapt to infect species with which they have longer...
Chapter
This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to...
Preprint
Full-text available
Interactions among co-infecting pathogens are common across host taxa and can affect infectious disease dynamics. Host nutrition can mediate these among-pathogen interactions, altering the establishment and growth of pathogens within hosts. It is unclear, however, how nutrition-mediated among-pathogen interactions affect transmission and the spread...
Article
Human activities alter elemental nutrient cycling, which can have profound impacts on agriculture, grasslands, lakes, and other systems. It is becoming increasingly clear that enhanced nitrogen and phosphorus levels can affect disease dynamics across a range of taxa. However, there are few mathematical models that explicitly incorporate nutrients i...
Article
Disease and community ecology share conceptual and theoretical lineages, and there has been a resurgence of interest in strengthening links between these fields. Building on recent syntheses focused on the effects of host community composition on single pathogen systems, we examine pathogen (microparasite) communities using a stochastic metacommuni...
Article
Evidence linking the accumulation of exotic species to the suppression of native diversity is equivocal, often relying on data from studies that have used different methods. Plot-level studies often attribute inverse relationships between native and exotic diversity to competition, but regional abiotic filters, including anthropogenic influences, c...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Like communities of free-living organisms, the distribution, abundance, and composition of pathogen communities are determined by interactions among ecological and evolutionary processes that occur at multiple spatial scales. Large scale processes, such as climate variation and seasonality, determine the potential over...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Much of the maple-basswood forest type, endemic to south-central Minnesota USA, has been fragmented and degraded due to recent human activity such as logging, agriculture, and development. Data on growth and survival patterns have been collected on over 1,000 trees in a maple-basswood forest restoration project started...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Most of the North American tallgrass prairie ecosystem was lost to farming and development during European settlement of the Midwest. Restoration of previously agricultural fields to native prairies is a current method implemented to increase nutrient retention, create habitat for native species, and re-establish ecosy...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This research aims to understand how soil nutrients affect interactions between plant viruses within their hosts, and how these interactions affect disease symptoms and transmission.