Amy E. Hutchinson

Amy E. Hutchinson
Boston University | BU

Ph.D. in Linguistics

About

11
Publications
743
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Introduction
Amy Hutchinson is an upcoming Visiting Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Boston University. Amy's research interests lie broadly in the fields of phonetics and second language acquisition and her dissertation researched focuses on the effect of foreign language film on second language speech production and perception. For a full list of recent research activity, please visit https://amyehutchinson.weebly.com/.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
The present study examines whether personality traits are predictive of success in non-native speech shadowing. Seventy-four monolingual native speakers of English shadowed French words containing high rounded vowels /y/ and /u/ produced by a native French model talker and provided information about their personality through a Big Five Inventory qu...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous laboratory-based research has found phonological memory to significantly affect the perception of non-native speech sounds (Inceoglu, 2019). The present study aims to bolster findings reported in Inceoglu (2019) and provide support for the efficacy of online research by replicating the study’s laboratory-based research in an online setting...
Poster
Full-text available
While access to authentic input from native speakers is critical when learning to produce speech in another language (Flege et al., 1997; Flege etal., 1995; MacKay et al., 2001; inter alia), this option is not always accessible to all learners. With that in mind, this study explores how another type of naturalistic exposure, foreign film, can contr...
Poster
Full-text available
It is well established that some individual factors (i.e., age, amount of input, motivation, etc.) play a considerable role in second language (L2) speech perceptual learning (Akahane-Yamada, 1995; Flege et al., 1997; Flege & Liu, 2001; inter alia). However, other factors, like personality type, have received less attention. This study therefore in...
Article
The present study examines the production of voicing by English-speaking learners of French in a traditional classroom environment, focusing on the juxtaposition between group patterns and individual tendencies. Thirty-one intermediate-level learners completed word-reading production tasks in French and English, and voice onset time was measured in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examines individual patterns in the production of French voicing categories by learners whose first language (L1) is American English. The focus of the study is on stability of individual production patterns across the first and second language (L2). Twenty-three intermediate-level learners of French were recorded reading an English and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previous research [7], showed that Mandarin speakers of English modified acoustic properties of their English speech as a factor of both the interlocutor (native vs. non-native speakers of English) and their own attitudes towards Mandarin and English. The present study investigates whether these acoustic modifications are perceptible to native spea...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous research (Dmitrieva et al., 2015) showed that Mandarin speakers of English modified acoustic properties of their English speech as a factor of both the interlocutor (native vs. non-native speakers of English) and their own attitudes towards Mandarin and English. The present study investigates whether these acoustic modifications are percep...
Thesis
Full-text available
Voice Onset Time (VOT) and onset f0 are known correlates of voicing distinctions in stops and both contribute to the production and perception of voicing (House & Fairbanks, 1953; Abramson & Lisker, 1965; Ohde, 1984). As the values of VOT and onset f0, which correspond to voicing categories, vary cross-linguistically, a second language (L2) learner...
Poster
Full-text available
Voice Onset Time (VOT) and onset f0 are known correlates of voicing distinctions in stops and both contribute to the production and perception of voicing (House & Fairbanks, 1953; Abramson & Lisker, 1965). The values of VOT and onset f0 which correspond to voicing categories vary cross-linguistically. Second language (L2) learner often have to acqu...

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