Amy Hondsmerk

Amy Hondsmerk
Nottingham Trent University | NTU · Centre for Museum and Heritage Management

PhD Researcher

About

2
Publications
43
Reads
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1
Citation
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
1 Citation
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
Introduction
My research looks at how video games are suited for use as an interpretative tool in museums. I’m focusing on game mechanics, narrative, emotion/affect, and how game structures can create and unpack arguments. I also dabble in coding.

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
As museums moved their work online in response to the pandemic, one question that arose was that of interpretation. The sector faced the challenge of interpreting their collections in difficult times and under unusual restrictions, requiring museums to rapidly adapt and evolve practices to engage visitors in a digital environment. During this peri...
Article
The Present and Future of History and Games symposium took place at the University of Warwick on the 28th February 2020. This article provides some critical reflections on the symposium and its open theme of the study of history and games, which invited papers from a broad selection of scholars and professionals working in an interdisciplinary fash...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
This thesis is an interdisciplinary study which will critically explore the intersection of museum interpretation and videogames, focussing on the potential of the videogame medium to respond to innovations in contemporary museum interpretative practice through an examination of videogame affordances. The intentional of this study is to identify how videogames could be meaningfully employed by museums as interpretative tools. As such, this thesis focuses on relevant topics including; how museum interpretation is current undertaken in both theory and practice, the crossover between museum interpretation and recent research in the field of game studies, and identifying the barriers that might prevent museums from using videogames. First, this thesis establishes the ongoing convergence of the museum sector and the videogame industry and the current theoretic understanding and trajectory of museum interpretation, considering the impact of both the move to the digital and the museum as a creator of interpretative media. Following this, a comparative literature review of the two fields examines key areas of intersection. These areas are as follows: narrative and storytelling, which is one of the key underlying themes of museum interpretation and an area of considerable possibility in videogames; emotion and affect, a research field which has gained considerable traction in both museum practice and academic research and game studies in recent years; and finally the idea of rhetoric and its role in the museum sector, where the concept of procedural rhetoric from game studies is considered in light of questions surrounding neutrality and authorship in museum interpretation. Finally, this thesis documents a six-month period of research through design through a placement with a museum partner. This placement explored the possible affordances and barriers influencing the application of this research in a live project, with the aim of enabling more informed reflection upon the outcomes of the research.