Amy Rose Coghlan

Amy Rose Coghlan
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

Bachelor of Science

About

5
Publications
806
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
27
Citations

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
We report new records of the fisheries-harvested subtropical greater amberjack Seriola dumerili for the south-east Pacific Ocean. Previously, only one species of Seriola (the yellowtail amberjack Seriola lalandi) was scientifically recorded for Rapa Nui (also known as Easter Island) despite local fishers’ asserting that three Seriola morphotypes ar...
Article
Full-text available
Recording plastic ingestion across various species and spatial scales is key to elucidating the impact of plastic pollution on coastal and marine ecosystems. The effect of plastic ingestion on the diets, physiologies, and behaviors of selected fish species are well documented under laboratory settings. However, prevalence of plastic ingestion in wi...
Article
Full-text available
Pyrosomes are efficient grazers that can form dense aggregations. Their clearance rates are among the highest of any zooplankton grazer, and they can rapidly repackage what they consume into thousands of fecal pellets per hour. In recent years, pyrosome swarms have been found outside of their natural geographical range; however, environmental drive...
Article
Full-text available
On 20 December, 2017, a mature Triaenodon obesus was observed at Hanga Roa Bay, Rapa Nui (Easter Island) at c.18 m depth. This observation increases both the range of T. obesus in the Pacific Ocean and the number of elasmobranch species at Rapa Nui. In combination with other recent sightings further extending the southern range of this species duri...
Article
Full-text available
Tokelau is among the most vulnerable countries to climate change from both an environmental and economic perspective, whilst being highly dependent on marine resources for dietary nutrition. Industrial as well as small-scale fisheries are present in Tokelau’s waters, with Tokelau itself only participating in small-scale fisheries. Industrial fisher...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The productivity, species composition and growth rates of coastal reef fish assemblages are changing in response to habitat degradation and climate change. However, to predict the ecological consequences of these changes we must better clarify the role of benthic/pelagic food sources. Whilst often assumed that coastal reef systems rely primarily upon benthic food sources, a recent study in a coastal upwelling region demonstrated that coastal reef fish assemblages may depend almost entirely on pelagic productivity. At present it is unclear to what extent this applies to alternative coastal ecosystems. If coastal reef fish assemblages depend largely upon planktonic food sources, incorporating plankton transport and distribution into coastal ecosystem models is a key priority. As planktonic food sources are usually ‘imported’ rather than locally produced, coastal fish assemblages may be strongly affected by processes impacting plankton production elsewhere. To compare the relative contribution of benthic and pelagic food sources to the biomass of coastal reef fish assemblages we will use bulk stable isotope analyses (lipid-extracted), along with gut content analysis, for ~1000 fish from broad functional groups (herbivores, planktivores, omnivores, corallivores and predators). Fish will be collected along a temperate-tropical temperature gradient from southern Tasmania to Far North Queensland along the East Australian coast, encompassing one of the world’s fastest warming marine regions. These findings will then be incorporated into size spectrum benthic pelagic ecosystem models to explore a range of climate change and species redistribution scenarios and their consequences for ecosystem function.