Amy Cartwright

Amy Cartwright
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Marine and Biological Sciences

BSc (Hons) Marine Biology and Coastal Ecology, Plymouth

About

6
Publications
1,872
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Introduction
Currently working as part Dr Emma Sheehan's team in the University of Plymouth's Marine Conservation Research Group (MCRG) focusing on the impacts of anthropogenic pressures such as marine renewable energy installations and fisheries on benthic ecosystems, including impacts on biodiversity and composition of community assemblages and mitigation measures such as MPAs and their long term management.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
This is an open access article under the terms of the Creat ive Commo ns Attri bution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract 1. Designated using a Statutory Instrument in 2008, Lyme Bay marine-protected area (MPA) is the UK's first and largest example of an amb...
Article
Full-text available
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are employed as tools to manage human impacts, especially fishing pressure. By excluding the most destructive activities MPAs can rewild degraded areas of seabed habitat. The potential for MPAs to increase ecosystem resilience from storms is, however, not understood, nor how such events impact seabed habitats. Extreme...
Article
Full-text available
To increase awareness of the current challenges facing the marine environment, the Future of Our Seas (FOOS) project brought together the expertise of scientists, public engagement experts and creatives to train and support a group of marine scientists in effective science communication and innovative public engagement. This case study aims to insp...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the opportunities and challenges of collaborative and participatory working across a range of stakeholders groups – scientists, fishers, and the local community – to address issues of social, environmental and economic sustainability within coastal fishing communities. Using key concepts in ‘social learning for sustainability...
Article
Full-text available
Offshore marine renewable energy installations (MREI) introduce structure into the marine environment and can locally exclude destructive, bottom trawl fishing. These effects have the potential to aid restoration of degraded seabed habitats but may be constrained by timescales of ecological succession following MREI construction, and the removal of...

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