Amélie Truchy

Amélie Truchy
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE) | INRAE · Department of Waters

PhD
Post-doc, INRAE

About

21
Publications
9,324
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
196
Citations
Introduction
Understanding how global change can affect communities, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem service delivery in freshwater ecosystems, bringing in concepts from spatial ecology and resilience theory. Interests: identifying the environmental factors that are into play, getting a mechanistical understanding of the factors regulating ecosystem functioning and assessing the risks on the provision of ecosystem services.
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2018 - August 2021
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2011 - February 2018
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
In these times of strong pressure on aquatic ecosystems and water resources due to climate change and water abstraction, intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) (rivers that periodically cease to flow and/or dry) have become valuable assets. Indeed, not only do they supply water but they also offer services for humanity. Despite a growing...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem functioning and community structure are recognized as key components of ecosystem integrity, but comprehensive, standardized studies of the responses of both structural and functional indicators to different types of anthropogenic pressures remain rare. Consequently, we lack an empirical basis for (i) identifying when monitoring ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
River networks are among Earth’s most threatened hot-spots of biodiversity and provide key ecosystem services (e.g., supply drinking water and food, climate regulation) essential to sustaining human well-being. Climate change and increased human water use are causing more rivers and streams to dry, with devastating impacts on biodiversity and ecosy...
Article
Full-text available
Riparian zones form the interface between stream and terrestrial ecosystems and play a key role through their vegetation structure in determining stream biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and regulating human impacts, such as warming, nutrient enrichment and sedimentation. We assessed how differing riparian vegetation types influence the structura...
Article
Community responses to and recovery from disturbances depend on local (e.g. presence of refuges) and regional (connectivity to recolonization sources) factors. Droughts are becoming more frequent in boreal regions, and are likely to constitute a severe disturbance for boreal stream communities where organisms largely lack adaptations to such hydrol...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Chapter 5 from the Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams: what water managers need to know. Technical report – Cost ACTION CA 15113
Chapter
Full-text available
In a nutshell: ▪ There is a variety of benefits that IRES provide to our societies, from the provision of materials such as water and timber, to iconic species, the regulation of biogeochemical cycles, and space for cultural manifestation and as a corridor for both wild and herded animals. ▪ Drying and rewetting processes, timing and duration of...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing climate change is increasing the occurrence and intensity of drought episodes worldwide, including in boreal regions not previously regarded as drought prone, and where the impacts of drought remain poorly understood. Ecological connectivity is one factor that might influence community structure and ecosystem functioning post drought, by fa...
Article
Full-text available
Context Community composition, environmental variation, and spatial structuring can influence ecosystem functioning, and ecosystem service delivery. While the role of space in regulating ecosystem functioning is well recognised in theory, it is rarely considered explicitly in empirical studies. Objectives We evaluated the role of spatial structuri...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem services (ES), as an interconnection of the landscape mosaic pieces, along with temporal rivers (IRES) are an object of research for environmental planners and ecological economists, among other specialists. This study presents (i) a review on the importance of IRES and the services they can provide to agricultural landscapes; (ii) a clas...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, artificial river impoundment, nutrient enrichment and biodiversity loss impair freshwater ecosystem integrity. Concurrently, beavers, ecosystem engineers recognized for their ability to construct dams and create ponds, are colonizing sites across the Holarctic after widespread extirpation in the 19th century, including areas outside their...
Presentation
Full-text available
Stream habitat is typically patchy but movements of organisms and materials at both local and larger scales connect habitat patches one another. These fluxes may promote faster recovery of biotic assemblages and hence the processes they are associated with after disturbances. We conducted an artificial stream channel experiment in which we investig...
Technical Report
Full-text available
WATERS is a five-year research programme that started in spring 2011. The programme’s objective is to develop and improve the assessment criteria used to classify the status of Swedish coastal and inland waters in accordance with the EC Water Framework Directive (WFD). WATERS research focuses on the biological quality elements used in WFD water qua...
Presentation
Full-text available
Hydropower accounts for 60% of Sweden’s electrical supply, with hundreds of rivers dammed across the country. However, the impacts of these dams on stream biodiversity and ecosystem processes, such as litter decomposition or algal growth, have been poorly researched. Such processes underpin key ecosystem services delivered from freshwater environme...
Article
Full-text available
Final ecosystem services (i.e. services that directly benefit humanity) depend fundamentally upon the various processes, regulated by organisms, which underpin ecosystem functioning and maintain ecosystem structures. Such processes include inter alia primary productivity, detritus decomposition, pollination, soil formation, and nutrient uptake and...
Presentation
Full-text available
Direct measurement of ecosystem process rates, such as litter decomposition, can provide an additional dimension in the bioassessment of human impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Such processes underpin key ecosystem services delivered from freshwater environments, including provision of food and clean water, and the mitigation of pollutants and toxins....
Poster
Full-text available
Quantification of ecosystem process rates provides an additional dimension in the bioassessment of human impacts on aquatic ecosystems. However, the responses of ecosystem processes to the linked changes in abiotic parameters, biodiversity, and community structure caused by human disturbances are poorly understood for most classes of impact. We inv...
Poster
Full-text available
The last decade has been one of growing research on ecosystem functioning which can be defined as the efficiency with which an ecosystem process transforms energy and nutrients and maintains ecosystem structures. Healthy ecosystem can support ecosystem services of importance for humanity, such as the provision of clean water, food and the mitigatio...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Vegetation is a central component of riparian landscapes, and provides multiple ecosystem services. The scientific community is aware of the importance of riparian vegetation and its role in both biological and physical processes. In recent decades such importance stimulated a steadily growing number of investigations focussing on riparian vegetation. However scientific investigations in this field are proceeding as isolated initiatives that translate to common practices at a very slow rate and with limited input from the practitioners. Evidence of poor knowledge conversion at societal levels includes the marginality of riparian vegetation in EU normative assets (e.g. the Water Framework Directive) and the complete neglection of vegetation-mediated processes in water policy debates. The limited consideration of riparian vegetation is also demonstrated by the widespread degradation of riparian forest resulting from centuries of water use and environmental pressures exerted by society on rivers. Such degradation motivated many restoration and mitigation projects aiming at the improvement of riparian status. Alas, many have failed because of scarce consideration of vegetation-mediated processes, so that public resources have been ineffectively allocated. In order to address the above-mentioned issues, this action aims to establish a baseline in the state of knowledge regarding riparian vegetation, coordinate research efforts, contribute to knowledge conversion from science to practitioners and to COST Inclusiveness Target Countries and to promote practitioners research interests in the scientific community.
Project
SMIRES is a COST Action addressing the Science and Management of Intermittent Rivers & Ephemeral Streams More than half of the global river network is composed of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES), which are expanding in response to climate change and increasing water demands. After years of obscurity, the science of IRES has bloomed recently and it is being recognised IRES support a unique high-diversity, provide essential ecosystems services and are functionally part of river networks and groundwater systems. However, they still lack protective and adequate management, jeopardizing hereby the water resource at the global scale. SMIRES brings together hydrologists, biogeochemists, ecologists, modellers, environmental economists, social researchers and stakeholders from 27 different countries to develop a research network for synthesising the fragmented, recent knowledge on IRES, improving our understanding of IRES and translating this into a science-based, sustainable management of river networks.
Project
The project focusses on three key topics in ecosystem functioning research: 1) Interactions between abiotic and abiotic drivers of functioning, and effects of anthropogenic activities on those drivers. 2) The development of a “multifunctional perspective”, involving the quantification of multiple ecosystem processes to gain a more complete picture of functioning 3) The development of an explicit metacommunity framework for research on functioning, to address fundamental deficiencies in our understanding of how diversity influences functioning when biota are mobile and resources are patchily distributed.