Amelia L. Russell

Amelia L. Russell
University of Georgia | UGA · Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources

Master of Science -- Wildlife Ecology

About

4
Publications
268
Reads
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3
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2021 - present
Common Ground Ecology
Position
  • Conservation ecologist
Education
January 2019 - August 2021
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Wildlife ecology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Mercury (Hg) and radiocesium (137 Cs) are well-known environmental contaminants with the potential to impact the health of humans and wildlife. Snakes have several characteristics conducive to studying environmental contamination but have rarely been included in the monitoring of polluted sites. We investigated the bioaccumulation of Hg and 137 Cs...
Article
Full-text available
In response to global amphibian decline the scientific community initiated the development of large-scale amphibian inventory and monitoring programs. One such program is the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program (NAAMP).Implementation and maintenance of a protocol that adequately characterizes amphibian calling activity across a continent is...
Article
Full-text available
The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 780-km2 United States Department of Energy (USDOE) property with a history of radiocesium (137Cs) contamination in reservoirs associated with the nuclear reactor cooling process. Radiocesium is a long-lived, gamma-emitting radionuclide that can bioaccumulate in biota. The Florida green watersnake (Nerodia floridan...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic activities have significantly increased the amount of mercury (Hg) cycling globally. Mercury can become bioavailable, accumulate in organisms, biomagnify in food webs, and can negatively impact wildlife health. Mercury contamination on the Savannah River Site (SRS) is a result of atmospheric deposition, coal combustion, and use of con...

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