Amelia DeFalco

Amelia DeFalco
University of Leeds · School of English

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20
Publications
1,088
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68
Citations

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
This essay interrogates the common assumption that good care is necessarily human care. It looks to disruptive fictional representations of robot care to assist its development of a theory of posthuman care that jettisons the implied anthropocentrism of ethics of care philosophy but retains care’s foregrounding of entanglement, embodiment and oblig...
Chapter
This chapter discusses how Munro’s stories evoke and complicate the “tricky,” to use Munrovian terminology, ethics and affects of writing, reading, and listening to stories. Her stories alert readers to the risks of affectivity, providing us with surrogates for embodied affects that titillate us with their proximity, at once intimate and removed. R...
Article
This essay examines recent European art films that reinterpret the revenge plot and radically challenge the possibility of legitimized violence. I argue that what I term “anti-revenge” films, in particular Andrea Arnold’s Red Road (2006), and Götz Spielmann’s Revanche (2008), frustrate the desire for vengeance (both the protagonist’s and the specta...
Book
Ethics and Affects in the Fiction of Alice Munro explores the representation of embodied ethics and affects in Alice Munro’s writing. The collection illustrates how Munro’s short stories powerfully intersect with important theoretical trends in literary studies, including affect studies, ethical criticism, age studies, disability studies, animal st...
Article
This essay considers the ethical dimensions of Atwood’s recent speculative fiction, the MaddAddam trilogy alongside a framework Nikolas Rose, Sunder Rajan, and others term biocapitalism. The trilogy imagines the social, cultural, affective, and ecological implications of the convergence of capitalism and biotechnology. In the MaddAddam trilogy, the...
Book
Imagining Care brings literature and philosophy into dialogue by examining caregiving in literature by contemporary Canadian writers alongside ethics of care philosophy. Through close readings of fiction and memoirs by Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Michael Ignatieff, Ian Brown, and David Chariandy, Amelia DeFalco argues that these narratives expose...
Article
Full-text available
This essay considers the ways in which graphic caregiving memoirs complicate the idealizing tendencies of ethics of care philosophy. The medium's "capacious" layering of words, images, temporalities, and perspectives produces "productive tensions. . . The words and images entwine, but never synthesize" (Chute 2010, 5). In graphic memoirs about care...
Article
This essay explores the cultural meanings and implications of “activity” and “idleness” in order to interrogate the repercussions of the persistent stigmatization of inactive bodies that cannot or will not be properly activated, according to medical, political, economic, and gerontological discourses. Older bodies are especially at risk of censure...
Chapter
The linking of age and ill-health is part of a cultural narrative of decline as age is often defined as the absence of good health. Research has shown that we are aged by culture, but we are also culturally made ill when we age. The cultural ambiguity of aging can thus deconstruct negative images of old age as physical decrepitude. This volume inve...
Article
This article analyzes Benjamin Britten's late works through the lenses of late style discourse and theories of aging, showing how these final compositions can be read as a reflection of the ways in which Britten's illness and physical disability in the last years of his life prematurely ushered the composer into 'old age' and its attendant physical...
Article
One of the central concerns of ethics is what to do with, or about, another person's suffering. What is one's obligation to other people, friends, family, strangers? And what is one's obligation to oneself? Ethical commitment can prove to be a high-wire act, a struggle to balance distance and presence, evaluation and interaction, abstraction and ac...
Article
The numerous and often contradictory accounts of Richard Strauss's final years and final works speak to the difficulty biographers have had producing a convincing narrative of the German composer's life. By examining how a sampling of German and English-language biographies tackle the controversies, political and musical, that colored Strauss's las...
Article
‘Out of the gravel there are peonies growing. They come up through the loose grey pebbles, their buds testing the air like snails’ eyes, then swelling and opening, huge dark-red flowers all shining and glossy like satin. Then they burst and fall to the ground’ (Atwood, 5). Margaret Atwood’s novel Alias Grace opens with this image of organic infiltr...
Article
This essay examines the repercussions of modernist primitivism on black subjectivity in Nella Larsen's Quicksand. The essay forges intertextual connections between Larsen's novel and contemporary cultural forms in order to untangle the cultural web of primitive fetishization that ensnares the protagonist.

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