Amanda Sinclair

Amanda Sinclair
University of Melbourne | MSD · Melbourne Business School

About

55
Publications
58,016
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,168
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
1293 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
How can bodies, embodied experiences and feelings, be recognized as central elements of becoming and being feminist? This article – a mixture of memoir and research reflection – aims to reveal the emergent and embodied nature of feminist paths using myself as case in point. Recounting five personal ‘movements’ over three decades, I show how my mate...
Article
The identities of women leaders can fall under intense scrutiny; they are often confronted with other's perceptions of them—perceptions that may not be wholly accurate. Through in-depth qualitative interviews of senior women leaders working in male-dominated industries, we explore how they experience and respond to feeling misidentified (internal i...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose This paper focuses on visual representation of women leaders and how women leaders’ bodies and sexualities are rendered visible in particular ways. Design/methodology/approach The arguments are based on a reading of the Danish television drama series, Borgen. The authors interpret the meaning of this text and consider what audiences might...
Book
Incorporating summaries of the latest neuro-scientific and leadership research, Amanda Sinclair shows how practices of mindfulness are helpful for all of us involved in the day-to-day of leadership, in those interactions in organisations, communities, schools and families where we seek to influence others towards positive outcomes.
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on the experiences of 29 Australian Indigenous artists and arts leaders, this article explores the way these individuals provide leadership by expressing and resisting cultural identities of Aboriginality. Scholars have shown how a key activity in leadership is ‘identity work’, or negotiating a sustainable leadership identity, yet much of t...
Book
Full-text available
The authors, an international team of experts, guide students on an entertaining journey through key concepts, contemporary issues and debates in leadership studies. Students can: Understand how theory comes to life through a fascinating selection of case studies, ranging from political leaders such as Tony Blair to business leaders such as Steve...
Article
Full-text available
This article originated in a leadership program for Indigenous1 Australian researchers, where a participant who had worked with traditional midwives in South Sudan reflected on her experiences. While there is increasing interest in how leadership studies can learn from Indigenous leadership experiences, much of this work has focused on men’s experi...
Article
Full-text available
While mindfulness has been part of Buddhism and other religious and philosophical traditions for millennia, the last decades have seen adoption of mindfulness in clinical settings and more recently, in organisations and leadership. This article reports experiences introducing practices and concepts of mindfulness to managers and leaders across a wi...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the leadership of Australian Indigenous artists and arts leaders. We advance the idea of ‘territories’ to convey the overlapping contexts in which Indigenous artistic leaders work, and through this framework seek to highlight the embodied ways individuals enact leadership across country and community. Thematic, narrative and d...
Article
Identity asymmetry, the experience of being misidentified by others, has been theorized to have important implications for individuals at work. While the concept has been introduced and explored theoretically, it has yet to be examined empirically. Through qualitative research, we investigate if and how women leaders in male dominated organizations...
Chapter
The main idea of this chapter is that leadership and diversity are usually combined in ways that collapse the multiplicity of differences. However, these ideas need to be unpacked from a critical perspective that calls attention to the power dynamics behind the construction of difference.
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
In this article we address the question 'what are we to do with ourselves?' by arguing for the reclamation of the erotic in higher education. By defining the erotic in a way which encompasses the pursuit of pleasure and love, we seek to re-differentiate the collapsed categories of sex and eros. Universities have always been environments where a lov...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
In this contribution to ‘Leading Questions’, I explore ‘place’ in leadership studies experimenting with a bifurcated textual presentation. I suggest that our writing about leadership comes from a mixture of internal and external, personal and geographic, places: ‘real’ and current as well as remembered and reconstructed. Making these places more ex...
Article
This article argues that leadership development is a process of seduction.Drawing on some stories of leadership development from my experience as participant, observer and teacher I show the ways in which certain sorts of highly valued leadership teaching contain seductive elements, including sweeping audiences off their feet and, in some contexts,...
Article
Full-text available
Organisational culture is recognised as a critical ingredient of organisational effectiveness. However, the popular “excellence” model of managing organisational culture is unsuited to the contingencies and character of many public sector organisations. Termed here the cultural control model, it is the only widely shared understanding of good cultu...
Article
Full-text available
Despite dramatic change in the Australian public sector, little attention has been paid to organisational culture. With the importation of private sector strategies and structures the traditional values of public administration have been eroded. Public organisations and their members have experienced consequences of “culture shock”, even “cultural...
Article
This study explores the views of Victorian Chief Administrators (CAs) about their jobs. CAs report that the environment of administration has changed in three broad areas: greater public expectations, a breakdown of the politics-administration dichotomy and difficulties reconciling managerial accountability with limited managerial autonomy. In resp...
Article
Full-text available
In 2004, after a year's leave, I started teaching a new Masters of Business Administration (MBA) subject called `Leadership and Change' in what I hoped was a more critical way. In this article I explore my experiences of launching two versions of this subject— one in a full-time MBA and one in an Executive MBA programme. I describe what I did and w...
Article
Amanda Sinclair and Jill Ewing report on a detailed study of women managers in a large retailing organisation to discuss why women are a poorly utilised and misunderstood reserve of managerial talent. They identify three main groups- ‘family first job occupants’, ‘mature career traditionalists’ and ‘career-family committeds’- and show how each has...
Article
Full-text available
Deaths in the workplace are traumatic events from which most organizations involved recoil rather than scrutinise. This paper explores workplace fatalities in multiple employer worksites over a year in Victoria, Australia. Individuals and organizations involved demonstrate conscious and unconscious defences in order to distance themselves from the...
Article
Full-text available
Here are some stories about writing critically. We have written them to beguile you and make you laugh. But we also want to provoke you to think about how and why you write. Interspersed are short, unashamedly idiosyncratic statements about what we think is wrong with much of the writing that goes on in the field, and why we think writing matters....
Article
Full-text available
Bodies and bodily performances – including physical stature, features, stance, gestures and voice – are central, yet ignored, elements in the accomplishment of leadership. In this article I offer some reasons for this neglect and attempt to redress it. My focus here is the bodily practices of two Australian leaders – the Victorian Chief Commissione...
Article
In this article I explore the impact of bodies in management education — why they have been ignored and what possibilities may be created when we understand them better. Bodies — including gestures, stature, posture and voice — shape and constrain how teachers and students act, what they think and what is taken away. The bodies of male and female t...
Article
Full-text available
Ideas about leadership in education, as in other areas of professional practice, increasingly borrow from management and business thinking. In this article I provide a commentary and critique of contemporary leadership in the form of a narrative of my own experience as an educator in a business school. My experience as a woman teacher of largely ma...
Article
Full-text available
Mining companies in Australia are increasingly required to interact with Indigenous groups as stakeholders following Native Title legislation in the early 1990s. A study of five mining companies in Australia reveals that they now undertake a range of programs involving Indigenous communities, to assist with access to land, and to enhance their publ...
Article
Full-text available
In Australia, interest in women in organisations has been overtaken by a focus on “managing diversity”. The first part of this paper describes this trend and the accompanying diversity discourse before reviewing the arguments for and against subsuming women as one category within a diversity framework. The second part draws on three examples to exp...
Article
The way forward in the understanding of gender relations in organizations is to turn from a focus on women to a broader focus on men and the construction of masculinities in management. Research on this task has made a substantial and growing contribution, yet management education and teaching poses additional challenges. This article reports the a...
Article
This is a transcript of a presentation made by Mary E Black and Amanda Sinclair at the "Winds of Change" conference in Sydney on July 12, 1998. This was an international conference looking at issues around women in universities. It is reprinted here as many of the issues are of relevance to the readers of this journal. Both Mary and Amanda are expe...
Article
Disquiet about the fitness and future of management education prompts this exploratory study of the MBA experience from women's points of view. Interviews with 16 women MBAs yield findings that are broadly consistent with research suggesting that women prefer to learn and be taught in ways which depart from traditional MBA approaches. In particular...
Article
Full-text available
Disenchantment with the Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is widespread and the proportion of women undertaking an MBA has plateaued. This paper argues one explanation for both phenomena—that the MBA is constructed on gendered understandings of who a manager is, what they should do and how they should learn. Women's experience of the dominan...
Article
Full-text available
Accountability is a cherished concept, sought after but elusive. New models of administrative reform promise to provide heightened accountability through managerial controls. Interviews with 15 Chief Executives of Australian public sector organisations reveal the chameleon quality of accountability. Accountability is subjectively constructed and ch...
Article
Full-text available
This paper assesses the potential of organisational culture as a means for improving ethics in organisations. Organisational culture is recognised as one determinant of how people behave, more or less ethically, in organisations. It is also incresingly understood as an attribute that management can and should influence to improve organisational per...
Article
Full-text available
People at work have been tyrannized by a team ideology based on the use of work groups as a key to effective organizational performance. The hegemony of this ideology has created an obsession with teams in workplaces governed by oppressive stereotypes of what teams should be like and how they should behave. This paper examines four elements of the...
Article
A survey of MBA graduates of the University of Melbourne suggests the need to re-examine myths about MBAs - who they are, why they undertake an MBA, what sort of careers they pursue and what capabilities they need. In improving the quality of management education, effort needs to be directed to matching programmes to a better understanding of the m...
Article
This paper is about management, primarily—where it's heading and where it needs to be heading—and secondly, the place of women managers in those two scenarios. Our perspective is that of two women currently engaged in research and teaching in the management, rather than women's issues or Equal Employment Opportunity area. We have filled out and tes...

Network

Cited By