Amanda A Cardoso

Amanda A Cardoso
North Carolina State University | NCSU · Department of Crop and Soil Sciences

PhD in Plant Physiology

About

40
Publications
18,616
Reads
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625
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
623 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Plant Physiology Professor | Researcher (30+ Published Papers) | Guest Editor of Frontiers in Plant Sciences | AF Editor of Plant Physiology | Currently Advising Grad and Undergrad Students | My studies target the functioning of plants during and after challenging conditions, with major implications for the improvement of cultivated plant productivity and the prediction of ecosystem responses to climate change | https://amandaavilacardoso.wixsite.com/ecophyslab
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - January 2019
Purdue University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2014 - December 2017
Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV)
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
Studies on co-occurring stresses have substantially increased in past decades as researchers have acknowledged that plants are rarely challenged by a single stress in natural settings. High salinity occurs in over one-third of agricultural lands across the globe, resulting in major yield losses (Abbas et al., 2013). Simultaneously, soil droughts ar...
Article
Full-text available
Maintaining water transport in the xylem is critical for vascular plants to grow and survive. The drought-induced accumulation of embolism, when gas enters xylem conduits, causes declines in hydraulic conductance (K) and is ultimately lethal. Several methods can be used to estimate the degree of embolism in xylem, from measuring K in tissues to dir...
Article
Full-text available
Long-distance transport of water is essential for plant function, and this process is largely facilitated by the xylem. Water is transported under negative pressure within xylem conduits (i.e., unicellular tracheids and multicellular vessels) and between adjacent conduits through the pit membranes of interconduit pits (Fig. 1). In some species, pit...
Article
Ongoing changes in climate, and the consequent mortality of natural and cultivated forests across the globe, highlight the urgent need to understand the plant traits associated with greater tolerance to drought. Here, we aimed at assessing key foliar traits, with a focus on the hydraulic component, that could confer a differential ability to tolera...
Article
Auxins are known to regulate xylem development in plants, however, their effects on water transport efficiency are poorly known. Here we used tomato plants of the diageotropica mutant (dgt), which has impaired function of a Cyclophilin 1 cis/trans isomerase involved in auxin signaling, and its corresponding wild type (WT) to explore its effects on...
Article
Forest mortality during drought has been attributed to hydraulic failure, which can be challenging to measure. A limited number of alternative proxies for incipient leaf death exist. Here we investigate whether a terminal increase in abscisic acid (ABA) levels in leaves occurs across vascular land plants and is an indicator of imminent leaf death....
Article
Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth is a tree species native to the Brazilian Cerrado that has been listed as an endangered species due to its overexploitation in the last decades. Given its slow and difficult propagation in natural environments, propagation in plant nurseries appears as an interesting strategy to preserve this endangered species. Therefo...
Article
Xylem embolism resistance varies across species influencing drought tolerance, yet little is known about the determinants of the embolism resistance of an individual conduit. Here we conducted an experiment using the optical vulnerability method to test whether individual conduits have a specific water potential threshold for embolism formation and...
Preprint
Full-text available
Xylem embolism resistance varies across species influencing drought tolerance, yet little is known about the determinants of the embolism resistance of an individual conduit. Here we conducted an experiment using the optical vulnerability method to test whether individual conduits have a specific water potential threshold for embolism formation and...
Article
Leaves are key photosynthetic organs impaired by soil waterlogging. Here, we evaluated the role of nitrate nutrition in alleviating waterlogging-induced stress in leaves of soybean (Glycine max). Plants were cultivated with or without nitrate nutrition over short- (three days) or long-term (40 days) treatments prior to waterlogging exposure. Very s...
Article
Full-text available
Garcinia brasiliensis is a tropical tree species of economic importance to local populations in the Amazon and Atlantic forests. The plant propagation of this species occurs mostly through seeds and despite that very little information about seedling emergence and growth is currently available. Here we assessed basic information on the seed and see...
Article
Xylem resistance to embolism is a key metric determining plant survival during drought. Yet, we have a limited understanding of the degree of plasticity in vulnerability to embolism. Here, we tested whether light availability influences embolism resistance in leaves and stems. The optical vulnerability method was used to assess stem and leaf resist...
Article
Soil waterlogging negatively impacts plants due to reduced oxygen availability in the rhizosphere. Here we selected two Coffea canephora clones with contrasting tolerance to drought and oxidative stress to test whether they would also exhibit contrasting tolerance to waterlogging and post-waterlogging reoxygenation. Plants were exposed to six days...
Article
The overall coordination between gas exchanges and plant hydraulics may be affected by soil water availability and source-to-sink relationships. Here we evaluated how branch growth and mortality, leaf gas exchange, and metabolism are affected in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) trees by drought and fruiting. Field-grown plants were irrigated or not, and...
Article
Full-text available
The observation of a much-improved fitness of wild-type plants over abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutants during drought has led researchers from all over to world to perform experiments aiming at a better understanding of how this hormone modulates the physiology of plants under water-limited conditions. More recently, several promising approaches...
Article
Full-text available
The Fourth Xylem International Meeting (XIM4) brought together over 100 plant scientists to discuss a wide range of topics related to embolism resistance and efficiency of long-distance water transport through plants, and their implications for cultivated and natural systems. The diversity of methods, plant species, and physiological processes disc...
Article
Full-text available
Dynamic variation of the stomatal pore in response to changes in leaf-air vapour pressure difference (VPD) constitutes a critical regulation of daytime gas exchange. The stomatal response to VPD has been associated with both foliage abscisic acid (ABA) and leaf water potential (Ψ l ); however, causation remains a matter of debate. Here, we seek to...
Article
Rising air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) is believed to mitigate the negative impacts of global climate changes such as increased air temperatures and drought events on plant growth and survival. Nonetheless, how elevated [CO2] affects the way coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plants sense and respond to drought remains a critical unknown. In this study, pott...
Article
Changes in leaf size have been demonstrated to considerably affect leaf hydraulic properties, which in turn impact plant photosynthesis and productivity. In this study, we selected five genotypes from four coffee species (Coffea spp.) with highly contrasting individual leaf areas (from 25 to 280 cm 2) to test whether changes in foliar area result i...
Article
Full-text available
Lycophytes are the earliest diverging extant lineage of vascular plants, sister to all other vascular plants. Given that most species are adapted to ever-wet environments, it has been hypothesized that lycophytes, and by extension the common ancestor of all vascular plants, have few adaptations to drought. We investigated the responses to drought...
Article
Full-text available
Key message Leaves were forced to accumulate starch as much as possible but maintained relatively low soluble sugar levels with no evidence of photosynthetic feedback downregulation. Abstract Here, we examined whether the regulation of photosynthesis in coffee depends on sink activity or carbohydrate build-up in source leaves and how the coffee tre...
Article
Full-text available
The driver of leaf mortality during drought stress is a critical unknown. We utilized the commercially important tree Persea americana, in which there is large variation in the degree of drought-induced leaf death across the canopy, to test whether embolism formation in the xylem during drought drives this leaf mortality. A large range in the numbe...
Article
Full-text available
Key message We analysed field-grown coffee trees that faced the most severe drought event in the last 28 years in Brazil. Vulnerability curves indicated that water potentials were low enough to decrease leaf hydraulic conductance and carbohydrate content under drought. However, individual tree mortality was not observed indicating a great resilienc...
Chapter
Heavy metals are among the main pollutants affecting plant photosynthesis. A broad literature screening reveals that heavy metals impair, in a type‐ and dose‐dependent manner, many aspects related to the photosynthetic apparatus. This chapter explores how stomatal and mesophyll conductances, chloroplasts, photosynthetic pigments, photosystems I and...
Article
Stomatal responses to changes in leaf water status are critical for minimizing excessive water loss during soil drought. A major debate has surrounded the evolution of stomatal responses to water status and this debate has particularly focused on the evolution of the regulatory role of the drought hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Studies relying on the...
Article
Full-text available
(Key message) Highly resistant xylem has evolved multiple times over the past 400 million years. (Context) Water is transported under tension in xylem and consequently is vulnerable to invasion by air and the formation of embolism. A debate has raged over whether embolism formation is non-reversible occurring at low water potentials or a regular di...
Article
Full-text available
Stomatal responses to changes in leaf water status are important for the diurnal regulation of gas exchange and the survival of plants during drought. These stomatal responses in angiosperm species are well characterized, yet an ongoing debate surrounds the role of metabolism, particularly the role of the hormone abscisic acid (ABA), in functionall...
Article
Full-text available
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The densities of veins and stomata govern leaf water supply and gas exchange. They are coordinated to avoid overproduction of either veins or stomata. In many species, where leaf area is greater at low light, this coordination is primarily achieved through differential cell expansion, resulting in lower stomatal and vein densi...
Article
Investment in leaf veins (supplying xylem water) is balanced by stomatal abundance, such that sufficient water transport is provided for stomata to remain open when soil water is abundant. This coordination is mediated by a common dependence of vein and stomatal densities on cell size. Flowers may not conform to this same developmental pattern if t...
Article
Coffee is one of the most important global crops and provides a livelihood to millions of people living in developing countries. Coffee species have been described as being highly sensitive to climate change, as largely deduced from modelling studies based on predictions of rising temperatures and changing rainfall patterns. Here, we discuss the ph...
Article
Nitric oxide (NO) plays important role in alleviating abiotic stresses in plants, including those caused by arsenic (As). Here, we examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous NO in Spirodela intermedia W. Koch (Lemnaceae) under As exposure. For this purpose, we evaluated the As content, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, membrane damage and...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA) in the leaf, triggered by a decrease in cell volume, is essential for a functional stomatal response to vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in angiosperms. However, it is not known whether rapid biosynthesis of ABA is triggered in other plant tissues as well. Through the application of external pressure to flower...
Article
Phytoremediation is a promising and efficient alternative for removing arsenic (As) from contaminated soil and water. Plants used in phytoremediation should be able to remove the pollutant and tolerate the damage caused by it. Here, we investigated the potential of an aquatic macrophyte, Spirodela intermedia W. Koch (Lemnaceae), to accumulate As wi...
Article
Full-text available
The seeds of Schinus molle are referred to as displaying physical dormancy because of their water-impermeable endocarp. Therefore, this work aimed to evaluate the germination of S. molle seeds as related to environmental conditions, scarification, storage time and seed anatomy. Various experiments were conducted to test the alleviation of dormancy...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this paper was to evaluate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) as a protecting agent of sesame seeds submitted to different concentrations of cadmium. The treatments were: water (control), water increased by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and other treatments regarding the concentrations of cadmium increased by SNP. The following determina...
Article
Full-text available
Studies that evaluate the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of germination within forest species are needed in order to improve our understanding of such processes. Mercury and dithiothreitol are indicated as important tools in studies that assess the activity of aquaporins during imbibition and germination of seeds. To investigate the alter...
Article
Full-text available
Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) is an Amazon species of elevated agro-industrial potential due the high content of omega-3 and omega-6 in its seeds. Despite of it, little information about its propagation by seeds is currently available. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess seed germination, seedling survival and growth of this species u...
Article
Full-text available
Studies concerning the structure of plant embryos are very important in different areas of study such as plant systematics and evolution or the handling of native species. This work aims at evaluating the anatomy of the embryo and vegetative organs of Garcinia brasiliensis in order contribute to taxonomical, ecological, handling studies of this spe...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Usually as part of seminars, researches provide plots showing a trend of papers using specific key words to track the interest in a field or a set of words, where the size is proportional to how many times they have been cited. Is there a simple way to obtain these figures?

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Project (1)
Project
In this call for papers we wish to attract contributions on the mechanisms underlying woody species responses to multiple abiotic stressors ranging from the global scale to biochemical responses. As we seek for general patterns of adaptation to multiple abiotic stressors, multi-species studies, both under fully controlled or field conditions, will be prioritized. Studies including one or few species will be also considered, but only if they deal with adaptation to complex abiotic conditions where simultaneous stressors determine plants performance (e.g. bogs, alpine tree line, Mediterranean maquis). Temporal and spatial patterns of abiotic stress tolerance are also considered of great importance. We encourage contributions using plant functional traits (morpho-anatomical, physiological, biochemical, developmental/phenological traits) to disentangle adaptive syndromes underlying species adaptations to multiple abiotic stressors. Studies dealing with intraspecific variability without sound adaptive perspective will not be considered. Guest editors: Giacomo Puglielli, Estonian University of Life Sciences Lauri Laanisto, Estonian University of Life Sciences Antonella Gori, University of Florence Amanda Cardoso, Universidade Federal de Viçosa For sumbission and more information please visit: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/flora/call-for-papers/special-issue-for-the-journal-flora-woody-species-adaptation