Alyson Stobo-Wilson

Alyson Stobo-Wilson
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation | CSIRO · Division of Land and Water

PhD

About

19
Publications
4,717
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187
Citations
Citations since 2017
18 Research Items
185 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Introduction of the domestic cat and red fox has devastated Australian native fauna. We synthesized Australian diet analyses to identify traits of prey species in cat, fox and dingo diets, which prey were more frequent or distinctive to the diet of each predator, and quantified dietary overlap. Nearly half (45%) of all Australian terrestrial mammal...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Introduced predators negatively impact biodiversity globally, with insular fauna often most severely affected. Here, we assess spatial variation in the number of terrestrial vertebrates (excluding amphibians) killed by two mammalian mesopredators introduced to Australia, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cat (Felis catus). We aim to identif...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding variation in the diet of widely distributed species can help us to predict how they respond to future environmental and anthropogenic changes. We studied the diet of the red fox Vulpes vulpes, one of the world's most widely distributed carnivores. We compiled dietary data from 217 studies at 276 locations in five continents to assess...
Article
Full-text available
Two introduced carnivores, the European red fox Vulpes vulpes and domestic cat Felis catus , have had extensive impacts on Australian biodiversity. In this study, we collate information on consumption of Australian birds by the fox, paralleling a recent study reporting on birds consumed by cats. We found records of consumption by foxes on 128 nativ...
Article
Two introduced carnivores, the European red fox Vulpes vulpes and domestic cat Felis catus, have had, and continue to have, major impacts on wildlife, particularly mammals, across Australia. Based mainly on the contents of almost 50,000 fox dietary samples, we provide the first comprehensive inventory of Australian mammal species known to be consum...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Invasive species are a major cause of biodiversity loss across much of the world, and a key threat to Australia's diverse reptile fauna. There has been no previous comprehensive analysis of the potential impact of the introduced European red fox, Vulpes vulpes, on Australian reptiles. Aims. We seek to provide an inventory of all Australia...
Article
Numerous studies have detailed the home‐range size of a variety of species. However, few have been able to determine the underlying contribution of species' traits (e.g. body mass and diet) versus the external environment (e.g. resource availability) on variation in home‐range size. We investigated the importance of body mass and resource availabil...
Article
Full-text available
The red fox Vulpes vulpes is one of the world’s most widespread carnivores. A key to its success has been its broad, opportunistic diet. The fox was introduced to Australia about 150 years ago, and within 30 years of its introduction was already recognised as a threat to livestock and native wildlife. We reviewed 85 fox diet studies (totalling 3169...
Chapter
Australia, a continent recognized globally for its unique, endemic fauna, has a lamentable record of historic mammal extinctions. In the past 250 years, Australia has lost at least 34 mammal species, with many more species now threatened, or with greatly diminished geographic distributions. Due to its productive environment and limited land-clearin...
Article
Context. Significant resources have been devoted to the control of introduced mesopredators in Australia. However, the control or removal of one pest species, such as, for example, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), may inadvertently benefit other invasive species, namely feral cats (Felis catus) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), potentially jeopardis...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a significant decline in arboreal mammals in northern Australia, especially in the lower rainfall region of the tropical savannas. Currently, we lack a fundamental understanding of the habitat requirements of these species to prevent further declines. We investigated how variation in habitat structure influences den‐tree selection by...
Article
The Australian sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps s.l., is widely distributed across eastern and northern Australia. Examination of historical and contemporary collections of Petaurus specimens and phylogenetic analyses have revealed considerable taxonomic diversity within the genus. We aimed to utilize an integrative taxonomic approach, combining ge...
Article
Full-text available
The Australian sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps s.l., is widely distributed across eastern and northern Australia. Examination of historical and contemporary collections of Petaurus specimens and phylogenetic analyses have revealed considerable taxonomic diversity within the genus. We aimed to utilize an integrative taxonomic approach, combining ge...
Article
Full-text available
Aim An interaction between reduced habitat structural complexity and predation by feral cats (Felis catus) has been hypothesized as the primary driver of mammal decline in northern Australia. However, we have a limited understanding of the drivers of the distribution and abundance of feral cats at a landscape scale, including whether the occurrence...
Article
In recent decades severe mammal declines have occurred in the vast and uncleared tropical savannas of northern Australia. Mounting evidence suggests that feral cats (Felis catus), large feral herbivores and increased frequency of high-severity fires, are all contributing to declines; however, the respective influence of each threat remains unclear....
Article
Despite a large body of research, little agreement has been reached on the ultimate driver(s) of geographic variation in body size (mass and/or length). Here we use skull length measurements (as a surrogate for body mass) from five Australian marsupial species to test the primary hypotheses of geographic variation in body size (relating to ambient...
Article
Full-text available
Widespread declines of small- to medium-sized, semi-arboreal mammals in the drier regions of Northern Australia are of global concern. These declines have been variously attributed to either disruption of available resources or increased predation pressure. We aimed to clarify causes of mammal decline in Northern Australia using a comparative metho...
Article
Full-text available
The potential spread of any invasive plant is a central concern in weed risk assessment. Calotropis procera is wind dispersed and forms extensive monospecific stands that reduce the productivity of pastoral land, but its potential distribution and drivers of its spread are not well known. Using maximum entropy methodology, we modelled current and f...

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