Alvin Thomas

Alvin Thomas
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Human Development and Family Studies

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology

About

31
Publications
11,722
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
582
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
560 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - April 2016
Palo Alto University
Position
  • Assistant Professor; Co-Director Center for Excellence in Diversity
September 2015 - June 2017
Palo Alto University
Position
  • Managing Director
September 2013 - July 2015
University of Michigan
Position
  • Adolescent and Child Psychology Fellow

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
We took a risk and resilience approach to investigating how witnessing physical violence influences adolescent violent behaviors overtime. We proposed efficacy to avoid violence as a major path of influence in this negative trajectory of adolescent development. We also focus on the protective roles of parenting behaviors for African American boys l...
Article
This brief report examines whether the effects of direct and vicarious police stops on adolescents’ academic adjustment via their psychological and physical well‐being differ across ethnic–racial and gender groups. Using national and longitudinal survey data from Black, Latinx, and White adolescents (N = 3004; 49% girls), we found that the police s...
Article
Objective Ethnic-racial minority children in the United States are more likely to experience father loss to incarceration than White children, and limited research has examined the health implications of these ethnic-racial disparities. Telomere length is a biomarker of chronic stress that is predictive of adverse health outcomes. We examined wheth...
Article
Purpose The literature indicates that engaging fathers in family therapy improves children’s mental health outcomes; however, clinicians are generally ill prepared for this challenge. Method This qualitative study applies multiple case-study design to focus group data addressing social worker’s training experiences and attitudes toward involving f...
Article
Full-text available
Background aim: To examine racial/ethnic variations in the effect of parents' subjective neighborhood safety on children's cognitive performance. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 10,027 children from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. The exposure variable was parents' subjective neighborhood safety. The outcome...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Recent studies have shown that parental educational attainment is associated with a larger superior temporal cortical surface area associated with higher reading ability in children. Simultaneously, the marginalization-related diminished returns (MDRs) framework suggests that, due to structural racism and social stratification, returns...
Article
Full-text available
Our objective was to determine age differences in the effects of a family-based intervention with 278 African American nonresident fathers and their 8 to 12-year-old sons. We assessed fathers’ parenting, sons’ perception of fathers’ parenting, and sons’ intentions to avoid violence (outcome) before and after the intervention. We first studied the m...
Article
Background: Despite their positive intention to increase school safety, zero-tolerance policies may perpetuate racial disparities in health. Zero tolerance refers to school policies and practices that mandate predetermined punishment in response to student misbehavior regardless of the context or rationale for the behavior. Black children are subje...
Article
The current study examined the promotive and protective roles of hyperarousal and hypervigilance for community violence exposure over time in a sample of African American adolescent males. Participants were 135 African American male high school students (Mage = 15.18 years, SD = 0.98). Participants completed measures of exposure to community violen...
Article
Full-text available
The environmental affordances (EA) model posits that maladaptive self-regulatory strategies (e.g., emotional eating) directly and indirectly heighten African Americans’ risk for downstream medical morbidities while also potentially mitigating the psychological impact of stressors. We empirically tested the full EA model. In doing so, we investigate...
Article
To better understand the moderating effect of coping mechanisms (distraction and rumination) and internal assets (hope) on the relationship between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms, a sample of 363 African American students (65.3% female; mean age = 20.25 years; SD = 2.39) from two large Midwestern Universities were surveyed using s...
Article
This study investigated the implementation of a newly piloted Emotion Management Programme (EMP), with 14 boys (9-17 years old) housed in a juvenile center in Saint Lucia. The intervention is a skill-oriented cognitive-behavioural therapeutic (CBT) approach addressing behavioural problems among a high-risk group. Cultural and clinical factors were...
Article
Compared to other groups, African American men experience proportionately greater adverse social and economic circumstances, which have been linked to poor mental health. A growing body of literature has begun to examine depressive symptoms among African American men; however, limited literature has examined the concurrent contributions of risk and...
Article
Full-text available
The protective effect of family structure and socioeconomic status (SES) on physical and mental health is well established. There are reports, however, documenting a smaller return of SES among Blacks compared to Whites, also known as Blacks’ diminished return. Using a national sample, this study investigated race by gender differences in the effec...
Article
Full-text available
Youth who feel connected to people and institutions in their communities may be buffered from other risk factors in their lives. As a result, increasing connectedness has been recommended as a prevention strategy. In this study, we examined connectedness among 224 youth (ages 12–15), recruited from an urban medical emergency department, who were at...
Article
Youths’ perceptions of their neighborhood are shaped by continued exposure to neighborhood influences. African-American boys in poor, urban contexts are more directly affected by their neighborhoods and are more likely to develop related difficulties such as victimization experiences, and exposure to violence. This study examines African-American b...
Article
African American boys are more likely than same-aged counterparts to live in disadvantaged neighborhoods characterized by exposure to physical violence, lower socioeconomic status, poor parent education, and acts of violence. The current study used structural equation modeling to test the associations between witnessing violence, peer and parent ex...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging adulthood is a critical developmental period that bridges adolescence and adulthood and is distinguished by identity exploration through education, vocation, relationships, and culture. However, the transition to adulthood is disrupted for African Americans, because they experience interpersonal and institutional discrimination in everyday...
Article
Full-text available
Using a person-centered approach, we examine phenomenological variations in exposure to violence for Black males and describe risk and protective factors associated with patterns of violence exposure. We ran K-means iterative cluster analysis to determine patterns of violence exposure and conducted analysis of variance to test whether clusters diff...
Article
Full-text available
Aggression is an important correlate of violence, depression, coping, and suicide among emerging young African American males. Yet most researchers treat aggression deterministically, fail to address cultural factors, or consider the potential for individual characteristics to exert an intersectional influence on this psychosocial outcome. Addressi...
Article
This dissertation examined the influence of risk and protective factors in predicting violent behavior for in a sample of 552 African-American adolescent males. Boys perception of safety in their neighborhoods was also explored. The main risk factors in this project included exposure to violent experiences, affiliation with deviant peers, and perce...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: High levels of aggression between siblings have been associated with deleterious short- and long-term effects. The objective of the current study was to examine how different types of violence exposure may be related to this form of aggressive behavior in children. Methods: This study examined 213 mother–child dyads that were exposed to...
Article
Full-text available
A major historical shift is taking place in Tibetan Buddhism with the relocation of large numbers of monks from Tibet and the establishment of monasteries in Dharamsala, India and other parts of South Asia. This has created a shift in the way that young men are joining these monasteries and leading this age old religious tradition. Fifteen college...
Article
Full-text available
The aggressive African American male is a pervasive stereotype in America. This view of African American males has found support from those who claim a biological basis for this perceived propensity for aggression and violence. High arrest rates are used as an indicator for defining African American males as more aggressive and more violent than ma...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty St. Lucian men were interviewed using a constructivist approach aimed at better understanding participants’ genderrelated development. Emerging themes included a masculine identity intertwined with responsibility and independence, aversion to gay men, gender-related role tension, and the powerful influence of parents and teachers on gender r...

Network

Cited By