Allura F. Lothary

Allura F. Lothary
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · College of Applied Health Sciences

PhD

About

18
Publications
1,615
Reads
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24
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
24 Citations
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Introduction
My research interests focus on understanding what factors might help older adults maintain a high quality of life with particular emphasis on motivational and cognitive factors. I am transitioning into applied intervention research focused on technology-based health interventions to improve wellbeing for older adults. I am particularly interested in the roles of aging attitudes and motivation on long-term outcomes in older adulthood.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - September 2021
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2016 - September 2020
North Carolina State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2016 - September 2020
North Carolina State University
Field of study
  • Lifespan Developmental Psychology
August 2012 - May 2016
Luther College
Field of study
  • Psychology and Anthropology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Concerns about loneliness and social isolation for older adults were already evident but have been exacerbated during the pandemic. Home and Community Based Organizations (HCBOs) provide support for their older clients in the community and need to support their staff, who may be working remotely. We are exploring the potential of video chat technol...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Video technology has the potential to provide older adults with socially and cognitively engaging activities for in-home participation. We are exploring use of OneClick.chat, a video technology platform, to present older adults with and without mild cognitive impairment opportunities for engagement. In collaboration with iN2L we have developed even...
Article
Full-text available
Aging attitudes have important consequences on functioning in later-life. A critical question concerns whether such attitudes may bias perceptions of one’s own aging, with potentially negative effects on important outcomes. Using data from adults aged 30 – 85 in the US (n=315), Hong Kong (n=317), and Germany (n=623), we examined the impact of age a...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the physical activity, social connections, and psychological well-being of seniors who participate in the sport of pickleball. A total of 36 pickleball players who were over the age of 65 completed an online survey that assessed pickleball participation, social connections, physical/mental h...
Article
Full-text available
Research has shown the amount of effort we expend towards our goals depends on a sense of self-efficacy, perception of task difficulty, and likelihood of achieving our goal. All of these processes are susceptible to the influence of affect. For example, negative moods may impede goal achievement by increasing perceptions of difficulty (Silvestrini...
Article
Full-text available
Activity that places demands on cognitive resources has positive effects on cognitive health in old age. To further understand determinants of age-group differences in participation, we examined how negative aging stereotypes and responses associated with a cognitively challenging activity influenced future willingness to engage in that activity. S...
Article
Full-text available
Subjective age has been extensively researched as a predictor of physical and mental health outcomes in older adulthood. However, the mechanisms behind subjective age have not yet been established and reasons for longitudinal changes are unclear. Selective engagement theory (SET; Hess, 2014) proposes a connection between increases in objective and...
Article
Full-text available
Past research has demonstrated an association between health and cognitive resources, intrinsic motivation, and activity participation in older adulthood, both cross-sectionally and from a daily perspective (e.g., Queen & Hess, 2018; Hess et al., 2018). This highlights the potential importance of motivation as a mediator of the impact of changing p...
Poster
Full-text available
Selective Engagement Theory (SET; Hess, 2014) proposes increases in the costs associated with engaging in cognitive activities as we age. These costs have been studied as effort expended and measured through cardiovascular responsivity. The effort required to maintain a certain level of performance may be higher for some than others, and is thought...
Preprint
Full-text available
The impact of aging stereotypes on task engagement was examined. Older adults (N = 144, ages 65 - 85) were exposed to primes designed to activate positive or negative stereotypes about aging, with half of the individuals in each stereotype group also assigned to a high accountability condition in order to enhance motivation. Participants performed...
Poster
Full-text available
According to Erikson (1968), the central challenge of the middle adult years is to develop generativity—a concern and sense of responsibility for the next generation and for society. In early middle adulthood, generativity is usually expressed through parenting and mentoring the young. Later, generativity broadens to include a commitment to communi...

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