Allison Bailey

Allison Bailey
Norwegian Polar Institute · Scientific Research Department

PhD

About

20
Publications
5,958
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
474
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
Norwegian Polar Institute
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The impact of the rapidly changing Arctic on zooplankton community structure and seasonal behaviour is not yet understood. Here we examine 6 months of under-ice zooplankton observations from the N-ICE2015 expedition (January to June 2015) in the Nansen Basin and on the Yermak Plateau north of Svalbard. Stratified sampling in the water column was do...
Chapter
Full-text available
Coastal waters are among the most productive regions in the Arctic (Leu et al. 2015; Smola et al. 2017; Ardyna et al. 2020). In these areas, a strong coupling exists between the sea and the land, and the shallow depths create a tight pelagic-benthic coupling (McGovern et al. 2020). These regions are also critical breeding and foraging grounds for m...
Article
Climate change is leading to alterations in salinity and carbonate chemistry in arctic/sub-arctic marine ecosystems. We examined three nominal populations of the circumpolar arctic/subarctic amphipod, Gammarus setosus, along a salinity gradient in the Kongsfjorden-Krossfjorden area of Svalbard. Field and laboratory experiments assessed physiologica...
Article
Full-text available
Widespread ocean acidification (OA) is modifying the chemistry of the global ocean, and the Arctic is recognised as the region where the changes will progress at the fastest rate. Moreover, Arctic species show lower capacity for cellular homeostasis and acid-base regulation rendering them particularly vulnerable to OA. In the present study, we foun...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is the increase in seawater pCO2 due to the uptake of atmospheric anthropogenic CO2, with the largest changes predicted to occur in the Arctic seas. For some marine organisms, this change in pCO2, and associated decrease in pH, represents a climate change-related stressor. In this study, we investigated the gene expression patte...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms b...
Data
Raw data from all three experiments. Metabolic rates (μgC μgC-1 d-1) and RNA/DNA ratios of CII-IIIs and CVs and gut DNA content (μgDNA ind-1) of CVs at the 4 treatments high pH/No food, high pH/Food, low pH/No food, and low pH/Food. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Widespread ocean acidification (OA) is transforming the chemistry of the global ocean, and the Arctic is recognised as a region where the earliest and strongest impacts of OA are expected. In the present study, metabolic effects of OA and its interaction with food availability was investigated in Calanus glacialis from the Kongsfjord, West Spitsber...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Animals’ ability to counter effects of ocean acidification (OA) will be enhanced by any present day adaptations to local environments in different geographic regions. Such differences in local adaptation may enable separated populations to complement each other if affected populations are re-populated from neighbouring populations. pH reaction norm...
Article
Full-text available
As the world's oceans continue to absorb anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, the carbonate chemistry of seawater will change. This process, termed ocean acidification, may affect the physiology of marine organisms. Arctic seas are expected to experience the greatest decreases in pH in the future, as changing sea ice dynamics and naturally cold,...
Data
As the world's oceans continue to absorb anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, the carbonate chemistry of seawater will change. This process, termed ocean acidification, may affect the physiology of marine organisms. Arctic seas are expected to experience the greatest decreases in pH in the future, as changing sea ice dynamics and naturally cold,...
Article
Full-text available
Research to date has suggested that both individual marine species and ecological processes are expected to exhibit diverse responses to the environmental effects of climate change. Evolutionary responses can occur on rapid (ecological) timescales, and yet studies typically do not consider the role that adaptive evolution will play in modulating bi...
Article
Full-text available
Calanoid copepods of the genus Calanus represent an important, nutrient-rich food source for a multitude of Arctic marine organisms. Although morphologically very similar, their life histories and ecological roles differ. Because the distribution of Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus corresponds to Arctic and Atlantic water masses, respectively,...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic is undergoing widespread warming. In order to understand the impact of climate change on Arctic marine food webs, we studied the at-sea distribution of foraging little auks in contrasting conditions of the Greenland Sea. While the eastern side of the Greenland Sea has experienced recent warming, the western side is still dominated by col...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We study the potential for evolutionary adaptation to rescue zooplankton populations from severe effects of future ocean acidification
Project
Experiment designed to understand the effects of the shift to a younger and thinner sea ice regime in the Arctic on energy flux, ice dynamics and the ice associated ecosystem, and local and global climate. And to improve our capacity to model the future more direct observations in the Arctic are needed. Objectives: Understand how ocean heat is mixed upwards towards the sea ice and to what extent it influences the sea ice energy budget. Understand the fate of solar radiation incident how its fate is affected by properties of the atmosphere, snow, ice, and ocean. Quantify the changing mass balance of Arctic sea ice and its snow cover. Improve modeling of the dynamics of the drifting ice Understand the ice associated ecosystem and model future changes. Effects on local and global weather systems