Allan Moore

Allan Moore
University of Surrey · Department of Music and Sound Recording

PhD

About

103
Publications
25,885
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1,290
Citations
Citations since 2016
36 Research Items
762 Citations
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Introduction
Allan Moore is Emeritus Professor in the Department of Music and Sound Recording, University of Surrey, researching (mainly) questions of music and meaning, using music analysis and hermeneutics. List of publications can be found at http://www.allanfmoore.org.uk and some of my music at https://audiomack.com/musiquallan and on Bandcamp: musiquallan.bandcamp.com.

Publications

Publications (103)
Preprint
Full-text available
A practical attempt to make sense of the claim that (popular) music can be understood. Due for publication in an edited collection, probably 2022.
Preprint
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Work in progress, part of book project on English folk song
Article
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ABSTRACT While there are plenty of popular songs which address ‘the hero’ in various ways, there is nowhere any substantial argument as to the efficacy of such address. In this paper I discuss the form such an argument might take. I begin by noting three historical processes. The first maps a process of democratisation of the hero through some five...
Article
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ABSTRACT The chapter's principal purpose will be to propose ways of addressing congregational song from an analytical perspective. It will address key terminology (particularly hermeneutics, music analysis, and congregational music) and will then make some distinctions among the ways that congregations act musically. The bulk of the chapter will co...
Article
Full-text available
Folk Song in England. By Steve Roud with contributions by Julia Bishop. London: Faber and Faber, 2017. 764 pp. ISBN 0571309712 - Volume 37 Issue 3 - Allan F. Moore
Book
This thoroughly revised third edition of Allan F. Moore’s ground-breaking book, now co-authored with Remy Martin, incorporates new material on rock music theory, style change and the hermeneutic method developed in Moore’s Song Means (2012). An even larger array of musicians is discussed, bringing the book right into the 21st century. Rock’s ‘prima...
Conference Paper
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Conference keynote addresses are often either reflective pieces or calls to action. This paper is intended, mildly, as both. The topic I address, albeit somewhat obliquely, is the ‘so what?’ which has driven much of my recent research, but addressed to us as a community of scholars engaged in the analysis of popular music, rather than just to my ow...
Presentation
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Research seminar given at Durham University, March 2018
Presentation
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A discursive enquiry into what we might mean by the concept of understanding music, briefly addressing a host of conventional answers and positing an alternative approach.
Book
This thoroughly revised second edition of Allan Moore's ground-breaking book features new sections on melody, Britpop, authenticity, intertextuality, and an extended discussion of texture. Rock's 'primary text' - its sounds - is the focus of attention here. Allan Moore argues for the development of a musicology particular to rock within the context...
Article
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The soil–culture relationship has been investigated from various points of view. Surprisingly, however, there is a marked absence of papers investigating the way such a fragile resource has been represented in popular song. Many lyrics disclose how such a resource is lived, perceived, represented, and objectified in everyday human life by ordinary...
Chapter
The subjects of this chapter are a heterogeneous collection of individuals, distinguished by far more than they share, but ultimately owing their greatest debt, and generally their identity, to the Second (British) Folk Revival and its inheritors. The folk tradition, of course, is just that: marked by the encounter with traditional songs and dances...
Book
Ende der 1960er / Anfang der 1970er kam es zu einem nachhaltigen Wandel in der Rockmusik: Gruppen wie Yes, Genesis, King Crimson und Emerson Lake & Palmer interpretierten Rock nunmehr anders (virtuoser, ausgedehnter, ausgefallener, Klassik-beeinflusst) als dies noch einige Jahre zuvor im Rock ‘n‘ Roll und in der Beatmusik der Fall war. Der Kategori...
Book
Ende der 1960er / Anfang der 1970er kam es zu einem nachhaltigen Wandel in der Rockmusik: Gruppen wie Yes, Genesis, King Crimson und Emerson Lake & Palmer interpretierten Rock nunmehr anders (virtuoser, ausgedehnter, ausgefallener, Klassik-beeinflusst) als dies noch einige Jahre zuvor im Rock ‘n‘ Roll und in der Beatmusik der Fall war. Der Kategori...
Article
Full-text available
The Musicology of Record Production. By Simon Zagorski-Thomas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 269 pp. ISBN 978-1-107-07564-1 - Volume 35 Issue 1 - Allan Moore
Chapter
Stereo is everywhere. The whole culture and industry of music and sound became organized around the principle of stereophony during the twentieth century. But nothing about this-not the invention or acceptance or ubiquity of stereo-was inevitable. Nor did the aesthetic conventions, technological objects, and listening practices required to make sen...
Chapter
Wie analysiert man eigentlich populäre Musik? Nach zwei Jahrzehnten eines überwiegend kulturwissenschaftlichen Blicks auf den Gegenstand besinnt sich die Popularmusikforschung wieder auf ihre Kernkompetenz: auf die Beschreibung von Musik als akustisches Phänomen. Die etablierten Techniken der Untersuchung von Kunstmusik erweisen sich hier jedoch al...
Article
Full-text available
Book review prior to editing
Book
Allan F. Moore presents a study of recorded popular song, from the recordings of the 1920s through to the present day. Analysis and interpretation are treated as separable but interdependent approaches to song. Analytical theory is revisited, covering conventional domains such as harmony, melody and rhythm, but does not privilege these at the expen...
Article
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Book review prior to editing
Article
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Do ‘folk musicians’ (whatever they are) think about what they are trying to do when they perform in ways different to those of ‘pop musicians’, ‘rock musicians’ or ‘classical musicians’? In other words, is there such a thing as a ‘folk aesthetic’, and can it be identified through the musical performances they give? (Such an implicit identification...
Chapter
The impact on British popular music of the ‘events of 1968’ took essentially two forms. The first was immediate, but seems in retrospect as desperately superficial as the attitude to these events of most of the British public. I outline the results of this impact in the first section below, with particular reference to the contemporary British musi...
Article
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When a stereophonic track is heard through headphones or over loudspeakers, the image of a virtual performance is created in the mind. This virtual performance, which exists exclusively on the record, can be conceptualised in terms of the ‘sound-box’ (Moore 1993), a four-dimensional virtual space within which sounds can be located through: lateral...
Article
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This article develops a theoretic base for the hermeneutics of spatialization in recorded popular song, drawing from work in ecological perception, cognitive linguistics, proxemics and some music semiotics. It uses this base in order specifically to observe a range of uses of the deictic expression ‘here’ in the lyrics of popular songs, and from th...
Article
Full-text available
This article is one of a series exploring the spatialization of sound sources in recorded songs and how they may be understood (see also ‘The Virtual Performance Space in Rock’, twentieth-century music 5/2). Its theoretical basis is multi-faceted, utilizing notions of ecological perception, of the sound-box, of the singer's persona, and of interper...
Article
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American Popular Music; from Minstrelsy to MTV. By StarrLarry & WatermanChristopher. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. xii+498 pp - Volume 28 Issue 1 - Allan Moore Book review prior to editing
Article
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Analysis of the spatial elements of popular music recordings can be made by way of the ‘sound-box’, a concept that acknowledges the way sound sources are perceived to exist in four dimensions: laterality, register, prominence, and temporal continuity. By late 1972 producers working across a range of styles and in different geographical locations ha...
Article
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: The subject of Wendy Fonarow’s study is precisely stated: ‘This book is about how a group of people feel when they listen to a particular type of music and use their bodies to experience it’ (p. 242). As a topic this seems laudable, although difficult to assess, and I find it very wel...
Article
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Moorefield Virgil, The Producer as Composer: Shaping the Sounds of Popular Music (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005), ISBN 0 262 13457 8 (hb) - Volume 4 Issue 1 - Allan Moore Book review prior to editing
Article
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Histories of ‘popular music’ abound: stories of agents whose medium of public expression is music (i.e. accounts of the dealings and output of singers, writers, producers, label executives etc.). Because these stories take as their subjects the succession of individuals who produce work, rather than the work successive individuals produce, there is...
Article
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Music and Letters 87.3 (2006) 485-487 If the final contributor to this book, Laura Vroomen, is right, the sociological study of music audiences remains limited by its origins. Over the course of its history, the field has moved from the consideration of audiences as undifferentiated consumers of a culture industry, through an awareness of cultural...
Article
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Ten Little Title Tunes: Towards a Musicology of the Mass Media. By Philip Tagg and Bob Clarida. New York: Mass Media Music Scholars' Press, 2003. xvi+898 pp. ISBN 0-9701684-2-x (paperback). - - Volume 24 Issue 2 - Allan Moore
Article
Celtic Modern: Music at the Global Fringe. Edited by Martin Stokes and Philip V. Bohlman. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2003. 293 pp. ISBN 0-8108-4781-7 (paperback). - - Volume 24 Issue 2 - Allan Moore
Article
Full-text available
Popular Music Studies. Edited by David Hesmondhalgh and Keith Negus. Arnold, 2002. ISBN 0 340 76247 0. 272 pp. - - Volume 22 Issue 3 - Allan Moore
Article
“You can almost sing along to it [laughs]’ Introduction There seem to be two alternative ways to argue the presence of a modernist aesthetic in an art object. The first way would see it as a necessary response to the social conditions of modernity, as exemplified by David Harvey (Harvey 1989), such that to evade a modernistic response would be rece...
Book
From Robert Johnson to Aretha Franklin, Mahalia Jackson to John Lee Hooker, blues and gospel artists play significant roles in twentieth-century culture. This overview of these genres provides an expression of the twentieth-century black American experience. Histories are questioned; songs and lyrical imagery are analyzed; perspectives are presente...
Book
How do we know music? We perform it, we compose it, we sing it in the shower, we cook, sleep and dance to it. Eventually we think and write about it. This book represents the culmination of such shared processes. Each of these essays, written by leading writers on popular music, is analytical in some sense, but none of them treats analysis as an en...
Article
The Cambridge Companion to Pop and Rock edited by Simon Frith, Will Straw and John Street. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. 303 pp, £15.95, paperback. - - Volume 19 Issue 2 - Allan Moore
Article
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The Musical Work – Reality or Invention? Edited by Michael Talbot. Liverpool University Press, 2000. vii + 260 pp. - - Volume 21 Issue 2 - Allan Moore
Article
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This article argues for the prematurity of any dismissal of the notion of authenticity as meaningful within popular music discourse. It synthesises a range of views as to how authenticity is constructed, and offers a tri-partite typology dependent on asking who, rather than what, is being authenticated. It focuses on rock and folk genres, but also...
Article
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THE EXPERIENCE of apparent exclusion from a discourse can be both painful and instructive. The operative distinctions between the terms 'style' and 'genre"1 seemed largely transparent during both my undergraduate and my postgraduate studies, a transparency which seemed to be of no great concern to my peers. Recently, however, it has appeared to me...
Article
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Reading Pop: Approaches to textual analysis in popular music. Edited by Richard Middleton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. 388 pp, £40.00 hardback; £14.99 paperback. - - Volume 18 Issue 1 - Allan Moore
Article
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The widely held association between the music of Big Country and a sense of “wide open spaces” is explored. Key stylistic features of the band's first three albums (The Crossing, Steeltown, and The Seer) are isolated, under the headings texture, harmonic language and technique. These features are then combined to support an argument that the associ...
Book
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) represents the highpoint of the recording career of the Beatles. This is the first detailed study to be made of this or any other such album, and it demonstrates how serious discussion of popular music can be undertaken without failing either the approach or the music. Dr Moore considers each song indivi...
Article
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The music of Yes doesn't portray a specific, coherent spiritual philosophy; but particular musical features common to an output extending through twenty years can be interpreted as signifying “the spiritual”. These are largely tied to explicit references in the lyrics, and operate across different domains: texture, timbre, production techniques, ha...
Article
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This article proposes that the demise of serialism as a compositional language is due to contradictions inherent within it, relating to such matters as: the status of the serial "order"; the role of the "aggregate"; identity and ordinal permutation; serial durations; and "meaning". It addresses these contradictions principally through the writings...
Article
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This article began, quite simply, as the presentation of a stage in the mapping-out of those harmonic practices which serve to distinguish rock and closely cognate styles (hereafter simply ‘rock’) from those of common-practice tonality on one hand, and jazz on another. It soon became apparent, however, that such a task necessitated some detailed co...

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