Alison Holm

Alison Holm
University of Tasmania · Speech Pathology; School of Health Sciences

BSpPath(Hons); PhD; LLB(Hons)

About

45
Publications
132,947
Reads
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2,085
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - December 2012
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
Consistency of word production contributes to carers' ability to understand children's speech. Reports of the proportion of words produced consistently by typically developing preschool children, however, vary widely from 17% to 87%. This paper examines the quantitative (consistency count) and qualitative (e.g. phonemic analysis) characteristics of...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Around 9% of children have difficulty acquiring intelligible speech despite typical sensory, neuro-motor and cognitive function. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) rely on descriptions of children’s speech errors to identify speech sound disorder (SSD) and determine intervention targets and goals. Existing normative data, however, need re...
Article
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41431-021-00855-4
Article
Communication difficulties are a core feature of Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS). However, a specific speech and language phenotype has not been delineated, preventing prognostic counselling and development of targeted therapies. We examined speech, language, social and functional communication abilities in 21 individuals with PMS (with SHANK3 invol...
Article
Full-text available
This study evaluated a bilingual intervention in the key learning area of mathematics. Nine typically developing Samoan–English students received math lessons in both Samoan and English. A control group of Samoan–English students received all lessons in English. The material covered and the amount of instruction was the same for each group. The onl...
Article
Full-text available
Speech-language pathologists are frequently required to assess culturally and linguistically diverse children. Achieving culturally sensitive, valid, and clinically feasible assessment of children in this population can be challenging. Several assessment options are available; however, the literature lacks discussion around clinical reasoning and d...
Article
Full-text available
The literature asserts that language impairment always manifests in both languages of a bilingual child. The case reported describes a boy, aged eight whose first language (L1, Vietnamese) is intact while his acquisition of English (L2, learned from four years) is significantly impaired. Culturally appropriate language assessments included dynamic...
Article
Full-text available
Book synopsis: Paediatric speech and language therapists are challenged by diminished resources and increasingly complex caseloads. The new edition addresses their concerns. Norms for speech development are given, differentiating between the emergence of the ability to produce speech sounds (articulation) and typical developmental error patterns (p...
Article
ABSTRACT This study investigated cross-linguistic influence in acquisition of a second lexicon, evaluating Samoan-English sequentially bilingual children (initial mean age 4 ; 9) during their first 18 months of school. Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary tasks evaluated acquisition of four word types: cognates, matched nouns, phrasal nouns and holo...
Article
Most children born preterm are considered neurologically normal and free of disability. However in follow-up studies at school age, preterm children, born without major impairment, have been shown to have lower cognitive abilities and associated academic, social and behavioural difficulties. This study investigated the literacy, phonological awaren...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the lexical development of nine Samoan-English bilingual children during their first year in English speaking preschools in Australia. Receptive and expressive lexicon in Samoan and English was assessed when the children had completed their first term of school (approximately 10 weeks) and then 6 months later. The bilingual chil...
Article
The majority of children born preterm are considered neurologically normal and free of disability. However, follow-up studies at school age report that preterm children born without major impairment have more subtle impairments, including language difficulties, which influence their ability to function. These findings indicate a need to examine spe...
Article
Full-text available
Developmental speech disorder is accounted for by theories derived from psychology, psycholinguistics, linguistics and medicine, with researchers developing assessment protocols that reflect their theoretical perspective. How theory and data analyses lead to different therapy approaches, however, is sometimes unclear. Here, we present a case manage...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the final paper in a special issue of Advances in Speech-Language Pathology. The paper presents an intervention case study of a 7 year old child with severe phonological difficulties described in Holm and Crosbie (8. Holm A., Crosbie S. Introducing Jarrod: A child with a phonological impairment. Advances in Speech-Language Pathology 2...
Article
In this paper, Jarrod, a 7 year old child with a severe phonological impairment is presented. The paper outlines the process of recruitment and selection of the child. The assessment battery and process is described in detail. The child's case history, family background and context, medical and developmental history, audiological history, education...
Article
Full-text available
Most children's speech difficulties are `functional' (i.e. no known sensory, motor or intellectual deficits). Speech disorder may, however, be associated with cognitive deficits considered core abilities in executive function: rule abstraction and cognitive flexibility. The study compares the rule abstraction and cognitive flexibility of children w...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research indicates that the extent of progress made by children with phonological disorders depends upon the nature of the word pairs contrasted in therapy. For example, phonemes that differ maximally in terms of place, manner, voicing and sound class (e.g., fan - man) in comparison to therapy where the word pairs presented differ minimall...
Article
Full-text available
The research reported investigated the efficacy of intervention, developed by a speech-language therapist and implemented by a teacher, for the language and phonological awareness (PA) abilities of pre-school, socially disadvantaged children. One study established that children from low socio-economic (SES) backgrounds had poorer skills on both mea...
Article
Full-text available
Although children with speech disorder are at increased risk of literacy impairments, many learn to read and spell without difficulty. They are also a heterogeneous population in terms of the number and type of speech errors and their identified speech processing deficits. One problem lies in determining which preschool children with speech disorde...
Article
Full-text available
In young, typically developing children, some word production variability is expected, but highly inconsistent speech is considered a clinical marker for disorder. Speech-language pathologists need to identify variability versus inconsistency, yet these terms are not clearly differentiated. Not only is it important to identify inconsistency, but al...
Article
This study investigated the literacy skills of all children in Year 6 of a Queensland school in a socially disadvantaged area who were exposed to a “whole language” approach to the learning of written language. Standardized tests of non-word spelling and reading comprehension (including written sentence responses) revealed a large group of children...
Article
Full-text available
Most investigations of bilingual language development focus on children acquiring two European languages. Little research has investigated diverse language pairs or compared the influence of the first language on second language development. The study reported here compared the lexical skills of three groups of 11-year-old students from different l...
Chapter
Book synopsis: This book critically examines the effects of language specificity on phonological acquisition and disorder through a collection of empirical studies of children learning typologically very different languages. The studies address many theoretical, clinical and methodological issues, such as: What role do developmental universals and...
Article
Full-text available
The Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology, (DEAP) is a comprehensive, individually administered, norm-referenced battery designed to provide differential diagnoses of speech disorders in children ages 3.0-8.11 years. Five tests (two screens and three assessments) comprise the DEAP assessment process. Although you are not required to a...
Article
Full-text available
Children with speech disorder are a heterogeneous group (e.g. in terms of severity, types of errors and underlying causal factors). Much research has ignored this heterogeneity, giving rise to contradictory intervention study findings. This situation provides clinical motivation to identify the deficits in the speech-processing chain that underlie...
Article
Full-text available
Book summary: Paediatric speech and language therapists are challenged by diminished resources and increasingly complex caseloads. The new edition addresses their concerns. Norms for speech development are given, differentiating between the emergence of the ability to produce speech sounds (articulation) and typical developmental error patterns (ph...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports a normative study on the phonological development of British English-speaking children. Speech samples of 684 children, aged between 3;0 and 6;11 years, randomly selected from nurseries and schools in eight different areas throughout the UK, were collected and analysed to obtain normative data. This paper reports on two aspects o...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 1998. Includes bibliographical references. Photocopy.
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the phonological development of children who acquire two languages sequentially in the preschool years. Some of these children will be referred for assessment of speech disorder. Distinguishing between delayed development due to the language learning environment and disorder is problematic in the absence of normative data on t...
Article
Longitudinal case studies of the successive phonological acquisition of two Cantonese-English bilingual children, aged 2;3 to 3;1 years and 2;9 to 3;5 years, are presented. The children were assessed at 4-week intervals. The first assessment of their phonology occurred when they had been exposed to English for three months. Phoneme acquisition and...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports developmental data for the phonological awareness and processing skills of 57 normally developing Tyneside preschool children, aged between 46 and 58 months. The children were assessed on eight tasks: consistency of word production, phonological variability according to speech production task, non-word imitation, syllable segment...
Article
Full-text available
Diagnosis of speech disorder in children acquiring two languages is problematic. There are few norms for bilingual language acquisition, and speech-language path-ologists are unlikely to speak both languages of the bilingual populations they serve. Further, knowledge concerning the phonological structure of many languages is limited. This article d...
Article
Full-text available
A bilingual Punjabi-English-speaking child, whose speech was characterized by inconsistent errors in both languages, participated in an intervention programme. A core vocabulary therapy approach was used targeting consistency of production. The accuracy and intelligibility of the child’s speech improved in both languages, even though therapy had on...
Article
Full-text available
The need to differentially diagnose children with speech disorder is widely accepted, although how to do this remains controversial. One differential diagnostic framework proposes four subgroups of speech disorder. Investigating the error patterns of bilingual children will validate the existence of subgroups. The subgroups are differentiated in te...
Article
The phonological awareness of 36 Cantonese-English bilingual children, aged between 3 & 10 years, was compared with matched monolingual English-speaking children. A battery of phonological awareness tasks was used that assessed syllable awareness, onset-rime awareness, phoneme awareness, reading & spelling. The only task differentiating monolingual...
Article
Speech disorder in monolingual Cantonese- or English-speaking children has been well described in the literature. There appear to be no reports, however, that describe speech-disordered children who have been exposed to both languages. Here we report on the error patterns of two preschool speech-disordered children who were learning two languages....
Article
Full-text available
This treatment case study presents a five-year-old bilingual Cantonese/English speaking boy with articulation and phonological errors. It reports two treatment phases: articulation therapy and phonological therapy. The articulation therapy was given in English and targeted the distorted production of /s/. The result was a perceptually acceptable pr...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between first and second language literacy was examined by identifying the skills and processes developed in the first language that were transferred to the second language. The performance of 40 university students from The People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, Vietnam and Australia were compared on a series of tasks that assesse...
Article
Book summary: Paediatric speech and language therapists are challenged by diminished resources and increasingly complex caseloads. The new edition addresses their concerns. Norms for speech development are given, differentiating between the emergence of the ability to produce speech sounds (articulation) and typical developmental error patterns (ph...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
On-going research projects aimed to (1) generate knowledge about typical rates and patterns of speech and language development in Korean-English bilingual children and (2) generate knowledge to facilitate clinical assessment procedures to identify Korean-English bilingual children with speech and language disorders