Alison C Cleary

Alison C Cleary
British Antarctic Survey | BAS · Ecosystems Programme

PhD

About

19
Publications
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224
Citations

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Copepods of the genera Calanus and Pseudocalanus are important components of Arctic marine ecosystems. Despite the key roles of these zooplankters, little is known about the organisms they interact with most intimately, their parasites and symbionts. We applied metabarcode sequencing to uncover eukaryotic parasites present within these two copepod...
Article
Full-text available
Ice is one of the most important drivers of population dynamics in polar organisms, influencing the locations, sizes, and connectivity of populations. Antarctic fur seals, Arctocephalus gazella, are particularly interesting in this regard, as they are concomitantly reliant on both ice-associated prey and ice-free coastal breeding areas. We reconstr...
Article
There is a large diversity of eukaryotic symbionts of copepods, dominated by epizootic protists such as ciliates, and metazoan parasites. Eukaryotic endoparasites, copepod-associated bacteria, and viruses are less well known, partly due to technical limitations. However, new molecular techniques, combined with a range of other approaches, provide a...
Article
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An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of human exploitation on the genetic composition of wild populations is important for predicting species persistence and adaptive potential. We therefore investigated the genetic legacy of large-scale commercial harvesting by reconstructing, on a global scale, the recent demographic history of the Antarctic fur seal (Arcto...
Article
Full-text available
The keystone role of Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba Dana, in Southern Ocean ecosystems, means it is essential to understand the factors controlling their abundance and secondary production. One such factor that remains poorly known is the role of parasites. A recent study of krill diet using DNA analysis of gut contents provided a snapshot of t...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating how populations are connected by migration is important for understanding species resilience because gene flow can facilitate recovery from demographic declines. We therefore investigated the extent to which migration may have contributed to the global recovery of the Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella), a circumpolar distributed...
Data
R-code for “A global cline in a colour polymorphism suggests a limited contribution of gene flow towards the recovery of a heavily exploited marine mammal.”
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill Euphausia superba are key components of Antarctic ecosystems, serving as the major prey item for most of the megafauna in the region. Coastal fjords along the West Antarctic Peninsula have been identified as biological hotspots, areas in which high biomasses of both E. superba and their megafauna predators are consistently observed....
Article
The copepod species Calanus glacialis is an important component of arctic marine food webs, where it is the numerically dominant zooplankton grazer and serves as a major prey item for fish, seabirds, and other predators. These copepods are typically considered to be phytoplanktivorous, although they are also known to feed on microzooplankton, and l...
Poster
Hunting and other human pressures have reduced many wild animal populations. Understanding how populations respond to these (and other) pressures is a central question in conservation biology. The Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella), a marine mammal that breeds on islands all around Antarctica, provides an interesting case study. This specie...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic krill Euphausia superba are a key component of food webs in the maritime West Antarctic Peninsula, and their life history is tied to the seasonal cycles of sea ice and primary production in the region. Previous work has shown a general in-shore migration of krill in winter in this region; however, the very near-shore has not often been sa...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites are not typically considered to be important components of polar marine ecosystems. It was therefore surprising when 18S rDNA surveys of protists in the West Antarctic Peninsula in winter revealed high abundances of parasite sequences. Parasite sequences made up, on average, over half (52%) of sequence reads in samples from deep water in...
Article
Full-text available
Krill are key members of many marine ecosystems, serving as a critical trophic link between microscopic organisms and large predators such as whales, fish, and seabirds. Krill feeding is thus important to ecosystem carbon cycling. Traditional approaches to determining in-situ krill feeding require a priori assumptions, and may have prey-type detect...

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