Alison Attrill

Alison Attrill
University of Wolverhampton · Department of Psychology

PhD Psychology

About

38
Publications
12,936
Reads
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147
Citations
Introduction
Senior Lecturer and Postgraduate online programme lead for Psychology at the University of Wolverhampton. Research expert with over 20 years experience, mainly in cyberpsychology (specialism cybercrime) and social cognitive psychology. Former co-ordinator of the Cyberpsychology Research at the University of Wolverhampton. Lead editor of three text books (including the Oxford Handbook of Cyberpsychology) and one single-authored book. Extensive research and lecturing experience, working on ex
Additional affiliations
August 2006 - April 2014
De Montfort University
Position
  • Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Publications

Publications (38)
Book
Full-text available
The self online runs as a unifying theme throughout the book Technology is constantly changing, and with this change and advancement comes changes in human behaviour. Our physical being is becoming increasingly replicated through video-chat and virtual worlds. At the same time it is being carefully crafted and manipulated through the use of photo...
Article
Full-text available
Using video recounts from revenge porn victims, this study explores whether levels of victim blaming differs for the sharing of self- and stealth-taken sexually explicit images and videos. Building on previous work which has demonstrated victim blame for both self- and stealth generated images in occurrences of revenge porn (Zvi & Schechory-Bitton,...
Chapter
Criminological and forensic psychology has had a long history of offering us unique insights into criminal behavior in the offline world. Yet the advent of the Internet has meant that we have had to think about the psychology of criminal behavior from a different perspective. The Internet brings with it new crimes, new ways to commit old crimes, an...
Book
Cover The Oxford Handbook of Cyberpsychology Edited by Alison Attrill-Smith, Chris Fullwood, Melanie Keep, and Daria J. Kuss Oxford Library of Psychology Description The internet is so central to everyday life, that it is impossible to contemplate life without it. From finding romance, to conducting business, receiving health advice, shopping, bank...
Article
Full-text available
Online health support groups (OHSGs) offer opportunities for people with various health conditions to gain support and associated physical and mental health benefits, however evidence suggests that those who choose to lurk in OHSGs may be less likely to accrue benefits (e.g. empowering outcomes) than those who actively contribute. Most research to...
Poster
Full-text available
This study was one of the first to discover motivations for photo sharing on social media, with a focus on defining the influence of Narcissism and Big Five personality traits to determine each motivation. • Users with specific personality traits are more likely to upload and share photos for certain motivations/ goals, even after controlling for o...
Book
Full-text available
ARCTT is a peer-reviewed all-purpose journal covering a wide variety of topics of interest to the mental health, neuroscience, and rehabilitation communities. This mission of ARCTT is to provide systematic, periodic examinations of scholarly advances in the field of Cybertherapy and Telemedicine through original investigations in the telemedicine a...
Article
Online self-presentation assumes that individuals intentionally control how others perceive them based on their online behaviors. Existing tools are limited in their ability to measure this notion of perception control and there is little understanding around factors which may affect the desire for perception control. This article reports on the de...
Article
The primary aims of this study were to test whether perceived dating success would differ between offline and online zero-acquaintance dating contexts and to investigate the role that self-esteem might play in these evaluations. Participants were presented with the same photos of targets in either an offline or online dating scenario and rated thei...
Chapter
In westernised cultures, there is an advancing shift from offline to online activities for many routine behaviours, including shopping and banking (Statista, 2015). Additionally, it was reported in 2014 that 28.3% of all UK fashion purchases and 28.8% of general goods purchases were made online. With online retail equalling big money, it is no wond...
Chapter
When reading the title of this chapter, the question that springs to mind is why think about the role of culture in the applied aspects of online behaviour? In order to answer this question, take a look around you. What do you see? You may be in your own living room, in an office, on a train or a bus. Take a moment to think about these surroundings...
Conference Paper
Catfish: The Detection of Red Flags, Dangers and Suspicious Behaviours in the Pursuit of Love Online.
Article
Full-text available
Research that has considered how individuals share their personal information in online compared to offline disclosures has often demonstrated heightened and accelerated disclosures in online interactions. Recent work has shown that this acceleration may be more likely to occur for the sharing of superficial self-information in initial general onli...
Chapter
Self-disclosure (SD) refers to revealing personal information about the self to others (Cozby, 1973). SD occurs in cyberspace via synchronous Internet arenas such as instant messaging and asynchronous communication such as email. It has mainly been considered to be a reciprocal tit-for-tat type exchange of personal facts, thoughts, and emotions (Al...
Article
Despite previous research demonstrating that online self-disclosure occurs in an accelerated manner compared to offline interactions, little is known about the content of online disclosures. This study highlights a number of issues that arise when exploring the self-disclosure of different types of personal information in initial general online com...

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