Alina Petrescu

Alina Petrescu
University of Central Lancashire | UCLAN · Lancashire Business School

PhD in Labour Economics
Looking for co-authors. I do quantitative research on job satisfaction, employee well-being, Covid-19, HRM, business

About

30
Publications
8,081
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369
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
229 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. Alina Ileana Petrescu is Research Fellow in Labour Economics at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), UK. Alina's field of specialisation is Labour Economics, combined with an interdisciplinary approach on Human Resource Management (HRM) Her research interests include analysing the impact of HRM practices on job satisfaction, company performance and work effort, in Britain as well as in an international comparative context.
Education
September 2002 - December 2006
Lancaster University
Field of study
  • Labour Economics

Publications

Publications (30)
Chapter
Regulation has been identified as one area where Brexit may deliver economic benefits. Sections of business opinion have long criticised the EU for the negative impact of its regulations upon the business community, and therefore the chapter examines the potential for a shift towards national rather than supra-national regulation to deliver economi...
Chapter
The fiscal impact of Brexit is an area where even detractors concede that the UK will gain from withdrawal from the EU, as smaller (if any) contributions will be made to cover the UK’s share of EU programmes. The precise nature of this fiscal benefit is, however, uncertain. This is partly due to the way in which the EU budget is only finalised ex p...
Chapter
The book concludes by examining the alternative trading models that have been advanced for Brexit. These range from close forms of relationship with the EU, such as membership of the European Economic Area (EEA) or customs union, or more independent options, such as concluding a free trade agreement (FTA) with the EU or alternatively trading accord...
Chapter
The inflow of foreign direct investment (FDI) is typically associated with a range of economic benefits, ranging from enhanced technological and innovation spillovers, which may in turn have positive productivity and employment effects, to offsetting the immediate balance of payments effects caused by the UK’s large trade deficit. The chapter exami...
Chapter
This chapter examines the range of studies that have been produced to predict the likely economic impact of Brexit. It considers the suggestion that a broad consensus exists amongst economists, that Brexit would prove damaging to the UK economy, and notes that this claim was based primarily upon a small sub-set of studies rather than reflecting the...
Book
The Economics of Brexit – Revisited builds upon and extends the analysis contained within the authors' previous book, The Economics of Brexit: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the UK's Economic Relationship with the EU, which arguably represented the most comprehensive and systematic evaluation of the UK’s economic relationship with the EU. The Economics...
Chapter
The impact of Brexit upon trade has been the primary concern for most economists since the lowering of trade barriers and resulting reductions in trade costs are viewed as overwhelmingly positive. The economic theory relating to trade integration and growth is considered, before noting the results of those studies which have sought to estimate the...
Chapter
One area almost completely ignored by economic studies, and yet which has possibly the greatest potential to influence whether Brexit will ultimately be viewed as a policy success or failure, concerns the flexibility of UK policy formation. Depending upon the final form that Brexit takes, it has the potential to present policy makers with additiona...
Chapter
One of the key areas of concern for the UK has been its high net migration. Insights into understanding migration, its motivations and impact are assessed, alongside a brief presentation of UK immigration statistics, its poor image in the public eye and the persistent UK labour market inequality. Migration can have a positive or negative impact for...
Chapter
One of the more contested elements of economic analyses of Brexit impact concerns productivity and growth effects. This chapter examines the proposition that there is a link between openness and growth, alongside competition and productivity. It questions whether openness is acting as a proxy for other factors, such as economies of scale and the ra...
Chapter
One of the main areas where even detractors of Brexit concede that the UK will benefit from withdrawal from the EU concerns the saving of the annual contributions (sometimes described as the membership fee) paid to that organisation.
Chapter
One of the primary motivations for the UK joining the EU was to reverse what was widely perceived at the time to be the UK’s relative economic decline. Whilst UK growth rates were actually quite reasonable over the early post war period, certainly when compared to more recent achievements, they were dwarfed by rates of expansion recorded by the six...
Chapter
The economic impact upon trade was the primary concern expressed by the opponents of Brexit during the recent referendum campaign.
Chapter
The analysis contained in the rest of the book is, in part, predicated upon the successful outcome of withdrawal negotiations with the EU, and the formation of new trading relationships both with the EU but just as importantly with the rest of the world.
Chapter
One of the areas where EU membership has been criticised as impacting negatively upon the UK economy concerns EU imposed rules and directives.
Chapter
One of the most notable claims made during the recent referendum campaign was that there was a broad consensus amongst economists, that Brexit would prove damaging to the UK economy.
Chapter
One remarkable feature of most studies which have sought to forecast the economic impact of Bresit, is that they have consistently ignored the role of macroeconomic policy in affecting the outcome. Presumably, this was to simplify the analysis, yet it was always going to be unrealistic. Indeed, almost immediately after the referendum result was ann...
Chapter
The inflow of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is typically associated with a variety of economic benefits, ranging from increased productivity to enhanced innovation and technological development.
Chapter
Migration has proven to be a difficult issue for successive administrations (Streeck 2016; IMF 2016), at least partly because of the centrality of the EU’s four fundamental freedoms, which includes the freedom of movement of people.
Book
This book presents a comprehensive evaluation of the likely economic impact upon the UK economy arising from Brexit. It seeks to assess both the methods adopted, and conclusions reached, by the existing economic studies, and supplements this by providing additional evidence to assist the reader in forming their own assessment of the relative merits...
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper, with an organisational focus, is to offer a novel examination of the association between workforce nationality composition and workplace flexibility practices (WFPs), an under-researched topic with high potential benefits at microeconomic and macroeconomic level. Design/methodology/approach – British data are u...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the relationship between workplace flexibility practices (WFPs) and corporate performance using data from the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey 2004. Disaggregating WFPs into numerical, functional and cost aspects enables the analysis of their relationships to an objective measure of corporate performance, namely...
Article
This paper examines the potential for workplace partnership to produce mutual gains through the implementation of high-performance, flexible-working initiatives. Using a large manager–employee matched dataset, originating in the British Workplace Employment Relations Survey (WERS 2004), it focuses upon a range of related workplace practices reporte...
Article
This workplace flexibility study uses primary data on private sector small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Lancashire, United Kingdom, collected in 2009 during the recent “credit crunch” recession. Key features include: (1) objective measures of SME performance; (2) a focus on the previously relatively neglected relationship between workplac...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between human resource management (HRM) practices and workers' overall job satisfaction and their satisfaction with pay. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses British data from two different cross‐sectional datasets. It estimates probit models with overall job satisfaction a...
Article
Full-text available
There is no doubt that management practices are linked to the productivity and performance of a company. However, research findings are mixed. This paper provides a multi-disciplinary review of the current evidence of such a relationship and offers suggestions for further exploration. We provide an extensive review of the literature in terms of res...
Article
Full-text available
There is no doubt that management practices are linked to the productivity and performance of a company. However, research findings are mixed. This paper provides a multi-disciplinary review of the current evidence of such a relationship and offers suggestions for further exploration. We provide an extensive review of the literature in terms of res...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we investigate the relationship between Human Resource Management (HRM) practices and workers' overall job satisfaction and their satisfaction with pay. To investigate these issues we use British data from the 'Changing Employment Relationships, Employment Contracts and the Future of Work Survey' and the 'Workplace Employment Relation...

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