Alif Silpachai

Alif Silpachai
Iowa State University | ISU · Department of English

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
6,190
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92
Citations
Introduction
For more information, please visit http://alifsilpachai.com/ . PS I know a few more languages, but ResearchGate does not list them.

Publications

Publications (18)
Thesis
Full-text available
This dissertation presents three studies that examined issues related to the production and the perception of pitch in a tone language. The first study examined linguistic contexts that may modulate consonant-induced pitch perturbations (CF0) in a tone language. Previous studies have produced mixed findings regarding the role of linguistic contexts...
Poster
Full-text available
Voice Onset Time (VOT) and consonant-induced fundamental frequency (CF0) may signal phonological laryngeal contrasts.This signaling may be modulated by prosodic structure and pitch context. However, such modulation in tonal languages is unclear. This study investigates the roles of prosodic structure and tonal context in the phonetic implementation...
Poster
Full-text available
Previous research suggests that repeated words in discourse are durationally shortened in comparison to the first mention, particularly when the words describe the same scene in a story. However, previous methods often relied on reading passages, which may be challenging to second language (L2) speakers or films, which require significant cultural...
Poster
This study investigates the relationship between fundamental frequency at the onset of voicing (onset f 0) and Voice Onset Time (VOT) in a tonal language with prevoiced, short-lag, and long-lag stops. Recent research on Thai and Vietnamese has suggested that higher f 0 in the following vowel is conditioned by long-lag stops, but this effect occurs...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we introduce L2-ARCTIC, a speech corpus of non-native English that is intended for research in voice conversion, accent conversion, and mispronunciation detection. This initial release includes recordings from ten non-native speakers of English whose first languages (L1s) are Hindi, Korean, Mandarin, Spanish, and Arabic, each L1 cont...
Poster
Previous research has not extensively investigated whether High Variability Phonetic Training (HVPT) is effective in training listeners with no musical background and no prior experience with a tone language in their identification of non-native lexical tones. In this study, it was investigated whether HVPT is applicable to the acquisition of non-n...
Thesis
Full-text available
Research on the organization between segments and tones allows for a better understanding of the syllable structure of a tone language. This paper investigates how onset consonants and tones are organized within a syllable in a tone language. The findings have implications for speech production models.
Poster
Full-text available
How do tones get adapted into languages with registers? This study examined loanword adaptation in which a language with registers borrows words from a language with lexical tones. In particular, this study presents an acoustic analysis of Thai loanwords in Mon, a language with two registers-one with tense voice and high f0 and the other with lax v...
Poster
This study presents an acoustic analysis of narrow focus (early focus) and broad focus, each in emphatic context (tune) in Thai, with the goal of providing a basic characterization of their prosody. To investigate prosodic realizations, target words from each of the 5 lexical tones in Thai were placed in subject positions of sentences with SVO stru...
Poster
This study presents an acoustic analysis of three sentence types in Thai (declarative, interrogative, and emphatic) with the goal of providing a basic characterization of their prosody. To investigate prosodic realizations of sentence final syllables, we placed, in a sentence-final position, a target word which varied in one of the 5 lexical tones...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal is to determine how a register language borrows words from a tone language. The findings have implications for tonogenesis and loanword phonology. This project investigates how Mon adapts Thai words but aims to examine other register-tonal language pairs (e.g., Mon-Burmese etc.). Collaborators are welcome.