Alicja Małgorzata Olszewska

Alicja Małgorzata Olszewska
Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology | NENCKI · Laboratory of Brain Imaging (LOBI)

Master of Science
Studying brain plasticity during musical training with neuroimaging.

About

10
Publications
1,455
Reads
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56
Citations
Introduction
Studying brain plasticity during musical training with neuroimaging.
Additional affiliations
November 2013 - April 2017
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Optimisation of Breast Cancer Screening for Women with Dense Breasts using Digital Breast Tomosynthesis
November 2013 - April 2017
Universitair Medisch Centrum Groninigen
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Optimisation of Breast Cancer Screening for Women with Dense Breasts using Digital Breast Tomosynthesis
November 2013 - June 2016
University of Groningen
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Lectures in Physics of Mammography and Fluoroscopy
Education
September 2011 - July 2013
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering
September 2010 - July 2011
Hanzehogeschool Groningen
Field of study
  • International Biomedical Engineering
February 2004 - June 2009
Warsaw University of Technology
Field of study
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Learning to play a musical instrument is a complex task that integrates multiple sensory modalities and higher-order cognitive functions. Therefore, musical training is considered a useful framework for the research on training-induced neuroplasticity. However, the classical nature-or-nurture question remains, whether the differences observed betwe...
Article
Full-text available
In order to gain an insight into scholars’ concerns emerging from the COVID-19 crisis, we asked scientists from all over the world about their attitudes and predictions regarding the repercussions of this current crisis on academia. Our data showed that the academic world was placed in an unprecedented situation. Results further showed that everybo...
Poster
Full-text available
The piano is a popular instrument in musical practice, but only a few MRI studies investigate the neuronal mechanisms underlying playing it. MRI-compatible piano requires adaptations for size and materials used. Moreover, study designs often sacrifice ecological validity for experimental controllabillity. We present open-source, proof-of-concept ex...
Poster
Full-text available
Musicians use auditory feedback, e.g. sound pitch, to monitor their performance for errors and facilitate learning. The aim of this project is to investigate the processing of errors, understood as a mismatch between the expected and perceived auditory feedback, in musicians. For this purpose, we developed a highly ecological, MRI-compatible keyboa...
Poster
Full-text available
Learning to play a musical instrument is a complex task that integrates multiple sensory modalities and higher-order cognitive functions. Therefore, musical training is considered a useful framework for the research of training-induced plasticity. Cross-sectional studies identified structural and functional differences between the brains of musicia...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: To evaluate at which sensitivity digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) would become cost-effective compared to digital mammography (DM) in a population breast cancer screening program, given a constant estimate of specificity. Methods: In a microsimulation model, the cost-effectiveness of biennial screening for women aged 50-75 was simu...
Article
Background: Because the incidence of breast cancer increases between 45 and 50years of age, a reconsideration is required of the current starting age (typically 50years) for routine mammography. Our aim was to evaluate the quantitative benefits, harms, and cost-effectiveness of lowering the starting age of breast cancer screening in the Dutch gene...
Article
Here, we developed a cell-based biosensor that can assess meat freshness using the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis as a chassis. Using transcriptome analysis, we identified promoters that are specifically activated by volatiles released from spoiled meat. The most strongly activated promoter was PsboA, which drives expression of the...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Would anyone recommend relevant literature on how to make a good power analysis for fMRI? Especially explaining why using pilot data is not advised, and what to use instead. Any recommendations for tools and literature would be appreciated.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Learning new skills is essential for being able to meet the challenges of everyday life. We learn to use of new hardware, software, playing musical instruments or speaking a second language. Without learning new skills we would not be able to stay up to date in an ever-changing world. However the learning process might be different depending on the type of skill we want to acquire. At the same time all changes in human behavior are reflected in the brain. These changes on the brain level are called neuroplasticity, that is the ability of the brain to undergo reorganization. In the last two decades the predominant view that neuroplasticity takes place early in life and becomes largely reduced in adulthood has been challenged. Contemporary research provided evidence for experience and practice-dependent neuroplasticity also in the adult human brain. Yet a lot remains to be discovered about how the adult brain changes in response to learning. When can we observe changes in brain function and structure while acquiring new skills? Are they irreversible or do they fade away when we do not use these skills? Is the time course of neuroplasticity similar for learning different skills? For complex skill learning do changes first occur at the level of sensorimotor cortex and later in more advanced higher order brain regions? What are the neuronal predispositions for learning a specific skill? The main aim of the current research project is uncovering the dynamics of adult human brain neuroplasticity in response to learning new skills. We have recently shown that the first 3 months of second language or script learning are critical for functional neuroplasticity. On the other hand, studies on instrumental musical training suggest neuroplastic changes after only few weeks of training. To reveal detailed time-course of brain reorganization we will examine two groups of subjects, where one will learn tactile Braille reading and the other to play piano/keyboard. These two types of skills require multisensory training, involving the components of sensorimotor systems together with higher-order cognitive processes. The trainings will last for 6 months with 90-minutes classes twice a week. During this time using non-invasive neuroimaging methods we will capture with unprecedented detail the functional and structural neuroplastic changes in the brain in response to learning. Subjects will participate in 6 neuroimaging sessions: before training, after 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 moths, 6 months and 12 months (i.e. 6 months after finishing the training). During functional brain imaging participants will perform tasks related to different aspects of tactile Braille reading or keyboard playing. We will also invite skilled Braille readers and professional piano players to perform these tasks in the MR scanner. This will allow us to directly compare if brain activation to new skill in late learners is becoming more similar to the one of experts in the course of learning. The current project will shed light on the understanding of the dynamics of functional and structural training induced neuroplasticity. Due to the longitudinal design of the project we will also have the opportunity to reveal what are the neuronal predispositions for learning new multisensory skills. National Science Center Poland -2018/30/E/HS6/00206