Alicia Luque

Alicia Luque
UiT The Arctic University of Norway · Department of Language and Culture

Ph.D.

About

9
Publications
1,168
Reads
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24
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2019 - August 2020
Texas Tech University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
May 2016 - July 2016
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2014 - May 2019
University of Illinois at Chicago
Field of study
  • Hispanic Linguistics
September 2012 - June 2014
University of Oregon
Field of study
  • Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT)
September 2012 - June 2014
University of Oregon
Field of study
  • Spanish

Publications

Publications (9)
Chapter
Full-text available
A critical question about bilingualism is how two or more languages are processed in the bilingual mind (e.g., Kroll, Bobb, & Hoshino, 2014). Previous research shows that bilinguals’ languages interact, at least at the lexical and phonological levels. Relatively little research has addressed whether this occurs at the syntactic level during sentenc...
Article
Full-text available
In the past 20 years, the field of bilingualism has made a substantial effort to better understand the set of cognitive mechanisms that allow bilinguals to functionally manage and use their lan- guages. Among the mechanisms that have been identified, cognitive control has been posited to be key for proficient bilingual language processing and use....
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we discuss the perceptions of researchers who work on heritage language bilingualism (HLB), educators who teach heritage speakers (HSs), and, crucially, HSs themselves regarding the nature of bilingualism in general as well as HLB specifically. Despite the fact that all groups are invested in HLB and that researchers and educators...
Article
Objective: Bilingual experiences are diverse, vibrant, and multidimensional. Yet, prior research has often homogenized bilingualism and based outcomes upon monolingual norms. Framing monolinguals as the norm distorts the reality of bilingual experiences. To promote a more diverse and inclusive study of bilingualism, we propose a theoretical and me...
Article
In this exploratory study, we considered the method of combining event‐related potentials (ERPs) and source attributions as a means for examining the explicit or implicit nature of second language (L2) knowledge and processing. We recorded electroencephalograms while L2 Spanish participants judged phrase structure and subject‐verb agreement sentenc...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding what traits facilitate second language (L2) learning has been the focus of many psycholinguistic studies for the last thirty years. One source of insight comes from quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG), i.e., electrical brain activity recorded from the scalp. Using qEEG, Prat et al. [1] found that functional brain connectivity i...
Poster
Full-text available
The study of individual differences (IDs) in language processing using event-related potentials (ERPs) has become more prominent in recent years. However, we have not yet reached a full understanding of variability in ERP correlates of first (L1) or second (L2) language processing; and methodologically, how we capture those IDs is still a matter of...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines potential changes to L1 (Brazilian Portuguese, BP) perception of phonotactic structure as a function of L2 (English) experience. Syllables with a coda stop violate syllable structure constraints in BP, but are licit in English. As a result, BP monolinguals perceive an illusory /i/ after an illicit coda (e.g., ob/i/ter ‘to obtain...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines potential changes to L1 (Brazilian Portuguese, BP) perception of phonotactic structure as a function of L2 (English) experience. Syllables with a coda stop violate syllable structure constraints in BP, but are licit in English. As a result, BP monolinguals perceive an illusory /i/ after an illicit coda (e.g., ob/i/ter 'to obtain...

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