Alicia Forsberg

Alicia Forsberg
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Psychology (Faculty of Science)

PhD in Human Cognitive Neuroscience

About

24
Publications
4,490
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114
Citations
Introduction
Lecturer at the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom. Research Interests: Cognitive Neuroscience: Working Memory and how it develops across the lifespan.
Education
September 2015 - December 2019
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Human Cognitive Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
There has been considerable controversy in recent years as to whether information held in working memory (WM) is rapidly forgotten or automatically transferred to long-term memory (LTM). Although visual WM capacity is very limited, we appear able to store a virtually infinite amount of information in visual LTM. Still, LTM retrieval often fails. So...
Chapter
In this chapter, we discuss the crucial role of working memory limitations in long-term learning. Convincing correlational evidence suggests that working memory ability is related to various measures of educational attainment. Here, we focus on how and why reduced working memory ability may restrict long-term learning. Specifically, we consider the...
Article
We explored the causal role of individual and age-related differences in working memory (WM) capacity in long-term memory (LTM) retrieval. Our sample of 160 participants included 120 children (6 – 13-years old) and 40 young adults (18 – 24 years). Participants performed a WM task with images of unique everyday items, presented at varying set sizes....
Article
Growth in working memory capacity, the number of items kept active in mind, is thought to be an important aspect of childhood cognitive development. Here, we focused on participants' awareness of the contents of their working memory, or meta-working memory, which seems important because people can put cognitive abilities to best use only if they ar...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this chapter, we review and discuss the often paradoxical-seeming nature of children's visual memory development. Typically, as adults, we tend to be skeptical of young children's memory reports, and adults and older children generally outperform younger children in lab-based memory tasks. However, paradoxically, some studies suggest that infant...
Article
We explored whether long-term memory (LTM) retrieval is constrained by working memory (WM) limitations, in 80 younger and 80 older adults. Participants performed a WM task with images of unique everyday items, presented at varying set sizes. Subsequently, we tested participants’ LTM for items from the WM task and examined the ratio of LTM/WM retent...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated how visual working memory (WM) develops with age across the early elementary school period (6‐7 years), early adolescence (11‐13 years), and early adulthood (18‐25 years). The work focuses on changes in two parameters: the number of objects retained at least in part, and the amount of feature‐detail remembered for such objects. Some...
Preprint
Full-text available
We view working memory as a general resource in which attention can be allocated to any type of information and stimulus input. One vital skill that requires the use of working memory is the comprehension and production of language. In this chapter, we outline the basis of the embedded-processes model of working memory. We then discuss how the diff...
Article
We investigated the role of working memory in symbolic and spatial algebra and related tasks across five experiments. Each experiment combined a processing task (expression evaluation, arithmetic, coordinate plane, geometry, or mental rotation) with verbal and spatial memory loads in a dual-task design. Spatial memory was compromised in the presenc...
Article
Working memory is defined by many as the system that allows us to simultaneously store information over brief time periods while engaging in other information processing activities. In a previous study (Rhodes, Jaroslawska et al. (2019) Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 148, 1204–1227.) we found that retention of serially presented lette...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of research illustrates that working memory capacity is a crucial limiting factor in our ability to follow spoken instructions. Despite the ubiquitous nature of instruction following throughout the lifespan, how the natural ageing process affects the ability to do so is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the con...
Research
Full-text available
Supplementary Materials for Why does Visual Working Memory Ability Improve with Age: More Objects, More Feature Detail, or Both? A Registered Report (Stage 1 Protocol) Alicia Forsberg, Eryn J. Adams, and Nelson Cowan University of Missouri
Research
Full-text available
Abstract We will investigate how visual working memory (WM) develops with age across the early elementary school period (6-7 years), early adolescence (11-13 years), and early adulthood (18-25 years). The work focuses on changes in two parameters: the number of objects retained at least in part, and the amount of feature-detail remembered for such...
Article
There are few examples of an extended adversarial collaboration, in which investigators committed to different theoretical views collaborate to test opposing predictions. Whereas previous adversarial collaborations have produced single research articles, here, we share our experience in programmatic, extended adversarial collaboration involving thr...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of working memory (WM) is a common feature of general cognitive decline, and visual and verbal WM capacity appear to decline at different rates with age. Visual material may be remembered via verbal codes or visual traces, or both. Souza and Skóra, Cognition, 166, 277–297 (2017) found that labeling boosted memory in younger adults by ac...
Preprint
Working memory is defined by many as the system that allows us to simultaneously store information over brief time periods while engaging in other information processing activities. In a previous study (Rhodes et al., 2019) we found that retention of serially presented letters was disrupted by the introduction of an arithmetic processing task durin...
Article
Full-text available
Working Memory (WM) training with the N-Back task has been argued to improve cognitive capacity and general cognitive abilities (the Capacity Hypothesis of training), although several studies have shown little or no evidence for such improvements beyond tasks that are very similar to the trained task. Laine et al. (2018) demonstrated that instructi...
Thesis
Full-text available
Working Memory (WM) refers to cognitive functions that support the ready availability of a small amount of information temporarily, while we undertake ongoing actions and mental activities (e.g., Logie & Cowan, 2015), and is viewed as a core mechanism underpinning higher-order cognitive abilities. Moreover, the functioning of WM abilities is import...
Article
Age-related decline in ability to bind and remember conjunctions of features has been proposed as an explanation for the pronounced decline of visual working memory (WM) in healthy aging. However, evidence that older adults exhibit greater visual feature-binding deficits than younger adults has been mixed. Binding deficits in older adults are often...
Article
The neural representation of multisensory space near the body is modulated by the active use of long tools in non-human primates. Here, we investigated whether the electrophysiological correlates of visuo-tactile integration in near and far space were modulated by active tool use in healthy humans. Participants responded to a tactile target deliver...

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